Category: Uncategorized

MATCH CUTS PRESENTS: KENT MONKMAN


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21
ONE NIGHT ONLY – 7:30 PM

Join Match Cuts and Spectacle Theater for an evening of film and video works by artist Kent Monkman.

KENT MONKMAN is a Canadian artist of Cree ancestry who works with a variety of mediums, including painting, film/video, performance, and installation. He has had solo exhibitions at numerous Canadian museums including the Montreal Museum of Fine Art, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art in Toronto, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, and the Art Gallery of Hamilton. He has participated in various international group exhibitions including: The American West, at Compton Verney, in Warwickshire, England, Remember Humanity at Witte de With, Rotterdam, the 2010 Sydney Biennale, My Winnipeg at Maison Rouge, Paris, and Oh Canada!, MASS MOCA. Monkman has created site specific performances at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, The Royal Ontario Museum, and at Compton Verney, he has also made Super 8 versions of these performances which he calls “Colonial Art Space Interventions.” His award-winning short film and video works have been screened at various national and international festivals, including the 2007 and 2008 Berlinale, and the 2007 and 2015 Toronto International Film Festival. Many of his media works are made with his long-time collaborator, Gisèle Gordon. His work is represented in numerous public and private collections including the National Gallery of Canada, the Denver Art Museum, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Museum London, the Glenbow Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art, the Mackenzie Art Gallery, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian and the Vancouver Art Gallery. He is represented by Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain in Montreal and Toronto, Trepanier Baer Gallery in Calgary and Peters Projects in Santa Fe.

MATCH CUTS is a weekly podcast centered on video, film and the moving image. Match Cuts Presents is dedicated to presenting de-colonialized cinema, LGBTQI films, Marxist diatribes, video art, dance films, sex films, and activist documentaries with a rotating cast of presenters from all spectrums of the performing and plastic arts and surrounding humanities. Match Cuts is hosted by Nick Faust and Kachine Moore.

FEBRUARY MIDNIGHTS

 
“For yourselves know perfectly that the day of the Lord so cometh as a thief in the night. For when they shall say, Peace and safety; then sudden destruction cometh upon them, as travail upon a woman with child; and they shall not escape.” 1 Thessalonians 5:2-3
Before APOCALYPSE, before LEFT BEHIND, there was one Evangelical film series willing to look at what became of the earth after the ascension of all good souls into heaven: A THIEF IN THE NIGHT. Shot in Des Moines, Iowa in the early 70s and screened in church basements, Campus Crusade for Christ mixers and the most late-night public access, these films have had a tremendous influence on generations of dispensationalist Evangelicals while generally ignored by godless Midnight maniacs. No longer! It is time you followed the long and winding path of Patty through the wilderness of darkness and learned the TRUTH about the Great White Throne Judgment that is to come!

 


A THIEF IN THE NIGHT
Donald W. Thompson, 1972.
USA, 69 min.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2 – MIDNIGHT
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17 – MIDNIGHT

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

Young Patty Jo Myers awakens to discover the rapture has come and she hasn’t ascended, which is a drag, as the UN assembles United Nations Imperium of Total Emergency (UNITE) to give everyone the mark of the beast. With the infectiously catchy/dreary theme song “”I Wish We’d All Been Ready” (from which the Left Behind series takes its name!) and some of Des Moines’ most washed-out 70s bummer vibe, A THIEF IN THE NIGHT is where it all begins.

Watch the Series Trailer !! 

 

 

 


A DISTANT THUNDER
Donald W. Thompson, 1978
USA, 77 min.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10 – MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23 – MIDNIGHT

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

Patty’s refusal to take the Mark of the Beast has led her to execution, which then flashes back to how she was betrayed, caught, meets old friends, continues to deny Christ and learns an awful lot about theology. Will it lead to her salvation? Probably not, as there’s two more films to go!

Watch the Series Trailer!! 

 

 

 


THE IMAGE OF THE BEAST
Donald W. Thompson, 1981
USA, 93 min.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3 – MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16 – MIDNIGHT

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

If your job somehow involves a computer, and you spend a lot of time in front of a computer, and if you think maybe all that computer time is brainwashing you into doing the work of the Antichrist, then *this* is the movie for you. Famines, floods, nuclear blight, it’s all here in all its midwest splendor.

Watch the Series Trailer!! 

 

 


THE PRODIGAL PLANET
Donald W. Thompson, 1983
USA, 126 min.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9 – MIDNIGHT
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24 – MIDNIGHT

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

In 1983, a crack commando unit was sent to wander the post-apocalyptic wasteland by a UNITE court for a sin they didn’t commit. These sad lost souls promptly escaped from rural Iowa to the New Mexico underground. Today, still wanted by the government, they survive as soldiers of fortune, fulfilling prophecy, spreading the good news in a modified motor home, so if you need help, if you have been forsaken, and if you can find them, maybe you can hire…THE PRAY TEAM!

Watch the Series Trailer!! 


MUBI PRESENTS: A DECENT WOMAN AND SELF-CRITICISM OF A BOURGEOIS DOG

Spectacle Theater is proud to showcase selections from MUBI’s Special Discovery series in concurrence with their online premieres.

MUBI is a curated online cinema, streaming hand-picked award-winning, classic, and cult films from around the globe. Every day, MUBI’s film experts present a new film and you have 30 days to watch it. Whether it’s an acclaimed masterpiece, a gem fresh from the world’s greatest film festivals, or a beloved classic, there are always 30 beautiful hand-picked films to discover.



A DECENT WOMAN
dir. Lukas Valenta Rinner, 2016
100 min, Argentina/Austria/South Korea

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

A housemaid working in an exclusive gated community in the outskirts of Buenos Aires embarks on a journey of sexual and mental liberation in a nudist swinger-club. Director Lukas Valenta Rinner depicts Argentina’s class tensions in this hilariously deadpan social satire. A perfect blend of mordant humor, formal meticulousness, eccentric anarchy and nudist tableaux. Official Selection: Toronto, Rotterdam, Sao Paulo, Mar del Plata



SELF-CRITICISM OF A BOURGEOIS DOG
dir. Julian Radlmaier, 2017
100 min, Germany
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

Young filmmaker Julian, ironically played by director Julian Radlmaier himself, falls for a young expat (Deragh Campbell) and offers her the leading part in his wannabe Communist fairy tale film. Radlmaier’s fantastical debut entirely lives up to (and delivers on) its astounding title. With welcome flourishes of humor, unreality and an incisive critique of political filmmaking, it resembles what a young Buñuel would have made of today’s Europe. Official Selection: Berlin, Rotterdam, Melbourne


LUMUMBA

LUMUMBA
dir. Raoul Peck, 2000
115 mins. In French and Lingala with English subtitles.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

“In the infinite nighttime beauty of the African savannah, two men have been given the task of cutting up three dead bodies. Then burn them. And then bury them. So ends Patrice Lumumba’s life, the man who was the first Prime Minister of the newly independent Republic of the Congo for just three months. But this is also where his story begins…”

On the occasion of Raoul Peck’s new THE YOUNG KARL MARX – to say nothing of a Black History Month celebrated under the most aggressively white-supremacist-friendly White House in at least one generation – it might be prudent to reexamine LUMUMBA, Peck’s breakthrough 2000 biopic of the Congolese pan-Africanist leader kidnapped and murdered by a CIA-backed Belgian death squad in 1961. Played by a fire-and-brimstone Eriq Ebounay, this Lumumba is a figure both complicated and heroic, whose oratory finesse sees him rising from mail clerk to beer salesman to Prime Minister by the age of 36; Lumumba narrates from beyond the grave, a radical flourish that only hints at the movie’s bigger analysis. Smeared as a symbol of Leftist impotence after failing to quell a separatist movement in his newly unified country’s rare-earth-mineral rich Katanga province to the north, Lumumba’s death sentence was carried out with the willful complicity of John F. Kennedy’s State Department (and a young Prime Minister named Joseph Kasa Vubu, played here by Maka Kotto.) His untimely death became the touchstone for U.S. interference in Africa in the name of anti-Communism, while Kasa Vubu would be overthrown by Army Commander Mobutu Sese Seko, who then lorded over Congo (then renamed as Zaire) with full American support for over three decades.

After making the 1992 documentary LUMUMBA: DEATH OF A PROPHET, Peck drew on newfound historical evidence to make LUMUMBA, which tackles the kind of backroom machinations typically left to Oliver Stone and Gillo Pontecorvo with the same red-hot, righteous anger that makes signature Peck’s later works like MOLOCH TROPICAL and I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO. Shot on location in Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Belgium, this is a sweeping biopic whose keen attention to detail and location-shot lushness initially appear to fit the mold of its Hollywood contemporaries – but to draw the comparison is to expose the milquetoast politics typical of big-budget, traditionally accessed narratives of power. Upon release, LUMUMBA was so incendiary that U.S. diplomat (and covert CIA officer) Frank Carlucci threatened to sue if his name was not removed from it, a challenge to which Peck rose by conspicuously bleeping mention of Carlucci out of an otherwise normal dialogue scene.


“It’s a flat-out thrill to see a movie about African politics that doesn’t condescend to audiences by placing a sympathetic white African at the center. Mr. Peck makes no plea for crocodile tears; his ambitions are as wide and encompassing as those of his subject. He’s out to make a film that exposes the ugliness of cold war politics and knee-jerk imperialism…
Elvis Mitchell, The New York Times

“Ten years ago, Peck made a documentary, LUMUMBA: DEATH OF A PROPHET, tracing the history and intrigue that he revisits in the feature film, which he describes as a “political thriller” rather than a biography, capturing Lumumba’s speedy rise and fall with deft narrative strokes and riveting, beautifully composed scenes, shot by Bernard Lutic to create not only a sense of urgency, but also a heightened sensitivity to emotional details, light and shadows work together in a kind of sublime tension.” – Cynthia Fuchs, Nitrate

“While he seems to know precisely what type of martyr Lumumba was, Peck resists a full, absorbing summation of who he may have been as a mortal… The film feels like bare- bones docu-fiction, though, resisting the attendant drama until the bitter, grisly end.”
– Wesley Morris, San Francisco Chronicle

Special thanks to Zeitgeist Films.

(poster by Tom Henry)

THE END OF THE WORLD


Snow in Egypt. Unholy congenital mutation. Toxic slugs aggrieved beyond their natural size. Artificial intelligence seizing the means of production. Lately it feels like Nostradamus predicted everything but the ascendancy of fascists with Flavacol hairpieces – but then again, this story isn’t over until we say it is. While world leaders enrich themselves by measuring their sausages in thousands of lives potentially lost to nuclear catastrophe, it’s time to set the clock a few isotopes closer to midnight. Because this is it, folks: THE END OF THE WORLD, coming to a goth bodega (and everywhere else as well) near you.


the human race never would
take my advice
and now just look at it
planning more wars which mean
more debts more troubles and still more wars
well if it wants to commit suicide
why should a little insect such as i
worry about it
a suicide is a person who has
considered his own case and decided
that he is worthless and acts
as his own judge jury and executioner
and he probably knows better
than anyone else whether there is justice
in the verdict
i am sorry to see the human race go
for it was in some respects almost as interesting
as several species of insects
but if it wants to die off
i shall not worry about it
i shall merely conclude that it knows what it wants
-archy the cockroach

(don marquis)


THREADS
Dir. Mick Jackson, 1984
United Kingdom, 112 mins.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 5 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

“The most terrifying and honest portrayal of nuclear war ever filmed.” – The Guardian

“Unsettlingly powerful.” – New York Times

“Realistic, terrifying and brilliantly conceived, THREADS is guaranteed to give you nightmares.” – New York Daily News

“This is not a film to be reviewed as a film; its art is that it cancels all aesthetic distance between our unthinking and the unthinkable: here is the death of our life and the birth of a new life for our children, a life … of slow death by radiation sickness and plagues and starvation and quick death by violence.” – Russell Hoban, The Listener

Upon its 1984 premiere at the height of global nuclear tension, THREADS shocked the entirety of the BBC’s viewership. Months later, it became the most-watched cable program in American history.

Exactingly directed by Mick Jackson (VOLCANO) from a screenplay by Barry Hines (Ken Loach’s KES), this graphic docudrama depicts the unraveling of society after the working-class city of Sheffield, UK undergoes nuclear attack. With talk of nuclear conflict back in the news, the time is now for audiences with fortitude to experience and absorb this shattering vision on the big screen.

WATCH SERIES TRAILER.

(poster by Merlin Mannelly)


SIX HUNDRED AND SIXTY SIX
Dir. Tom Doades, 1972
USA, 89 min.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4 – 7:30 PM
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25 – 5 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE


“You can accept the end of the world with a smirk, but you can’t accept your own death.”
Rarely screened outside of midwest church basements, SIX HUNDRED AND SIXTY SIX considers an orbiting space station and its crew dealing with nuclear holocaust on Earth, a dwindling food and air supply and the increasing suspicion the End of Days has come upon them. Starring the great Joe Turkel (Dr. Tyrell from BLADE RUNNER, The Caretaker from THE SHINING — actually pretty much every Kubrick film!) as Cap. Fergusson, it’s all far more wigged out than you might think, played for genuine pathos.Imagine a combination of DARK STAR and CHRISTMAS ON MARS shown at Youth For Christ centers and you’re close! Look for one-and-done director Tom Doades as The Officer!

WATCH SERIES TRAILER.



THE LATE GREAT PLANET EARTH

Dir. Robert Amram, 1979
USA, 90 min.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 5 – 7:30 PM
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8 – 7:30 PM
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

“The day of the Lord is near in the valley of decision.”

Based on the book of the same name, narrated by Orson Welles, THE LATE GREAT PLANET EARTH checks in on where our collective eschatological heads were at by the late seventies. It’s about Biblical prophecy in the sense that F FOR FAKE is about art forgery, which is to say that’s just the start. An overview/reenactment St. John The Divine’s time of vision on the island of Patmos meets a series of talking heads from sociologists to celebrities to psychics pontificating on revelations of tragedy to come, THE LATE GREAT PLANET EARTH mixes Biblical prophecy and sociographic speculation in a way that regularly blurs the line between Evangelical and New Age with plenty of memento mori to go around. All that and deep implications that Nixon might be the antichrist, sadly off by just a few Presidents.

WATCH SERIES TRAILER.


THE LAST DAYS OF PLANET EARTH
(aka CATASTROPHE 999)
Dir. Toshua Masuda, 1975/1999
Japan. 87 mins.
In crudely dubbed English.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4 – 5 PM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 18 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 26 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

Irwin Allen could only wish his name were attached to a spectacle as merciless and disgusting as THE LAST DAYS OF PLANET EARTH (also known as THE LAST DAYS OF MAN ON EARTH.) But the cataclysm is on both sides of the screen: LAST DAYS is a gone-atomic reedit of the far superior psych-out shockumentary PROPHECIES OF NOSTRADAMUS, threaded through with painfully overdubbed English dialogue. (In total, there are six versions of the film in question – including a re-edit undertaken by the producers after the Japanese moviegoing public took outrage at the original, with special effects supervised by Yoshimitsu Banno, director of alltime Spectacle favorite GODZILLA VS. THE SMOG MONSTER.)

You already know the story: man’s stupidity and hubris have dried out the world’s food supply, his addiction to capitalism has ruined the ecosphere forever, and his naive nuclear experimentation has created blood-drinking leeches and bats – spurring a colony of mutants to take hold of a tropical island in New Guinea, before turning on one another and going full-cannibal. Set pieces include a traffic jam-cum-firestorm that puts DEEP IMPACT to shame, entire cities wiped out like so much fiberglass and tinsel, and a suicide cult throwing themselves into the ocean at the dawn of a new millennium. Even though 1999 has come and gone, LAST DAYS is essential viewing for these end-times, an appropriately brain-numbing, apocalyptic remix that can only be called insane (in the film grain).

WATCH SERIES TRAILER.

 



 

STEWED ANGELS: CAROLINER ON TOUR

LIVING PROOF OF THE 1800’s (1995)
AN 1800S AFFECTUANT: A VISUAL VIEW OF HISTORY (200?)
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

STEWED ANGELS: CAROLINER ON TOUR from Spectacle Theater on Vimeo.

Described by an integral source (who wishes to remain anonymous) as “a collective of a bunch of denizens modeled in pitchfork clay and dipped in cowhide puree”, the band Caroliner began in San Francisco in 1983, apparently drawing their music from the songbook of an 18th century singing bull named, unsurprisingly, Caroliner.

Wielding bizarre pseudonyms, an uncomfortably mutating band name, and an ever-evolving roster, Caroliner blended Harry Smith’s dandruff, an obscurantist manner and the sound of a turntable playing Stockhausen at 3¼ rpm with intricate drawings + screenprinting of ergot poisoned half beast, not humans to complete their cardboard and cloth costumes, props, informational materials and what some have termed “Industrial Bluegrass” music.

Caroliner holds a special place in the heart of Spectacle, and presenting these tour videos from two different realms of the band’s career is a rare treat indeed. But what should you expect to see? Viewers should be aware that the answer is not for the weak of heart: STEWED ANGELS promises a lot of blacklight, sewn up street-found outlandish costumes, kids-book style animation, confused crowds, and potential acid flashbacks.

 

These eye poppin’ posters (design: Ben Tuttle) are available for sale ! At the theater or on Etsy !

 

 

ANTI-VALENTINES ’18

Celebrating the Season of Love. Anti-Valentines all February!

 


 


THE BLOOD ROSE (LA ROSE ÉCORCHÉE) 
Dir. Claude Mulot, 1970
France, 92 min.
Dubbed in English.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

This Valentines Day, if you find yourself in love with a tortured painter who promises to carry you off to his ancient castle in France, we strongly advise that you first see this film. Director Claude Mulot was mainly a maker of les films pornos, and LA ROSE ÉCORCHÉE has a certain sensuality wound around its EYES WITHOUT A FACE-esque plot. There are poisonous plants and nasty wounds, and passionate romance tested by tragedy and jealousy. Plastic surgery cannot heal old wounds, but it can certainly create new ones.

We have a beautiful copy of LA ROSE ÉCORCHÉE, and every candelabra-carrying, thinly gowned scene is sure to enchant. Brought to you by Mondo Macabre and Spectacle Anti-Valentines 2018.

See series trailer.



ALRAUNE
(a/k/a: A DAUGHTER OF DESTINY)

dir. Henrik Galeen
Germany, 1928
108 mins.
Silent with English intertitles.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 – 7:30 PM
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

Professor Jakob ten Brinken (Paul Wegener, DER GOLUM) is a mad scientist and “world famous authority on genetic cross-breeding” who vows to create life by impregnating a woman from the dregs of society with a mandrake root in an attempt to study the idea of nature vs. nurture. According to legend the root is believed to sprout from the spilled semen of a hanged man. One night his nephew, Franz, goes out and returns with a prostitute for the Professor to experiment on. She bears him a beautiful daughter, named Alraune (played by Brigitte Helm, fresh off the set of METROPOLIS), who the professor adopts and sends away to a convent. Despite her sheltering, Alraune grows up deceptive, corrupt, and promiscuous. After convincing her boyfriend to rob his parents and hit the road, Alraune dumps him for a circus magician and becomes his assistant. The professor finds her there, performing in the circus, and reprimands her til she leaves with him. Once home, he introduces her to the upper crust and showers her with gifts in an attempt to win her love. Alraune plays all sides of the fence and eventually drives her “father” to madness and desperation.

Galeen’s version of this strange legend is not the first, coming 10 years after a version now thought lost. The story would be told in 1930 and again in 1952. This version is highlighted by the cinematography of Franz Planer (who would later be nominated for Academy Awards and serve as DP on BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S) and the haunting performances of Wegener and Helm. This often overlooked gem of German cinema and twisted take on the traditional Frankenstein legend sits confidently alongside the other titles in this years Anti-Valentines series. A perfect last date movie.

See series trailer.

 



FOUR-SIDED TRIANGLE
dir. Terrence Fisher, 1953
UK, 81 min.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 26 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

Here is a love story from the source of modesty, propriety and evil in the form of human reason: the English middle-class. It is a tale from the wet end of a local doctor’s pipe, of how he nurtured a young genius named Bill and underwrote the laboratory Bill later built with his best friend and co-inventor, Robin. From a semi-electrified barn a contraption is made (out of plexiglass and television sets) with the ability to duplicate matter. Everyone can now own an original Monet and a Rolls Royce!

The rogue young scientists understand humanity little more than they understand economics, and Bill wants to push the machine into more bodily forms of replicas. Particularly, he wants to manufacture another young woman out of the one he has longed for since childhood. This desire is amplified by Lena’s recent marriage to Robin (itself a conventional arrangement for reproduction). Will she agree to be further duped? Who will the duplicate love, or will she even love at all?

See Series Trailer.

 

 


BLOOD IN THE DUST

 

 




CUT-THROATS NINE
(aka: Condenados a Vivir)
dir. Joaquín Luis Romero Marchent, 1972
Spain, 90 min.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1 – 10 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11 – 5 PM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

A wagon full of sadistic criminals is being chaperoned to prison through the mountains when they’re attacked by a gang of bandits seeking gold. What they didn’t realize is that it’s hidden in plain sight…in the very chains that shackle the men! When the dust settles only the sergeant, his daughter, and seven of the murderous prisoners remain. Without horse or wagon, the sergeant must face the elements, the trailing bandits, and the wrath of the seven men in tow while trying to reach their destination and protect his daughter, Sarah. Can Sgt. Brown get this motley crew to prison? Are one of the men the very same that murdered his wife? Is greed stronger than these golden chains?

Hailed as “possibly the most violent Eurowestern ever made” by Michael J. Weldon of Pyschotronic Magazine, CUT THROATS NINE surely lives up to it’s infamous reputation. A rare instance of a snowbound bloodbath, the film is as bleak as it is foreboding.

Presented by Hypercube Media.




GOD DOES NOT PAY ON SATURDAY
(aka: Dio Non Paga Il Sabato, Kill The Wicked!)
dir. Tango Boccia, 1976
Italy, 95 min.
In English.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

When a stagecoach robbery leaves one of their gang wounded, the remaining bandits hide out in a nearby ghost town and begin kidnapping and torturing anyone who happens to come by…

Though later remade as the psychedelic freakout MATALO! this version, made by “the Italian Roger Corman”, uses every part of the buffalo to create a stunning example in the Spaghetti Western tradition. Peppered with bright colors and religious iconography, GOD DOES NOT PAY ON SATURDAY manages to make even the light of day filled to the brim with tension. The ghost town setting creates an underlying sense of dread that gets ramped up by Angelo Francesco’s score. Lead actor Larry Ward would go on to be the voice of Jabba the Hutt.




CEMETERY WITHOUT CROSSES
dir. Robert Hossein 1969.
Italy. 85 min.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2 – 10 PM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 18 – 5:00 PM
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

After her husband is mercilessly hanged by a ruthless land baron, Maria implores Manuel, an old flame, to infiltrate the killer’s ranch and wreak vengeance. Manuel reluctantly leaves the ghost town where he lives to embark on the mission, but is ever haunted by his unrequited affection for Maria.

Prolific French actor Robert Hossein directed and starred in this inspired homage to his friend Sergio Leone. As sharpshooter Manuel, he dons one black glove (channeling the cool of garage rock band The Music Machine?) and imbues the whole production with laconic ennui. A visually striking and brooding picture, the requisite gritty and violent tropes are delivered with an artistic fervor ahead of its time.

“A French take on the Italians’ take on American genres — a “baguette western” ! Inspired by the international success of Sergio Leone’s DOLLARS trilogy, and armed with the catchiest of theme songs via international cult figure Scott Walker, CEMETERY WITHOUT CROSSES offers a Gallic spin on the Euro gunslinger pic.” – AGFA.

Presented by AGFA.




THE WIND IS WHISTLING UNDER THEIR FEET
Dir. György Szomjas, 1976.
Hungary. 95 min.
In Hungarian with English subtitles.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23 – 10 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS HERE

Original trailer from 2014:

György Szomjas brings exquisite style and pacing to this elegiac gallows western about a betyár — a kind of highwayman popular in 19th century Hungarian balladry — set amid the Great Hungarian Plain in 1937. It follows the path of a brooding, aging outlaw newly escaped from prison whose personal revenge quest dovetails with the interests of the landless herdsman who oppose the state’s building a canal through the fields on which they work their trade. He becomes an unlikely hero to unwashed vagabond workers while facing down a mutually-admiring adversary in the form of a forthright squire who had captured him before. Meanwhile, an opportunistic youngster attempts to work both sides to his benefit. As ditches are dug for canals and corpses alike, the state puts increasing pressure on the wistful squire, who realizes the social order is changing and his fortunes are in decline; and yet he remains dutifully attached to his mission.

Though carefully paced and based on historical documents, THE WIND IS WHISTLING UNDER THEIR FEET aims squarely for populist appeal. The autumnal palette, period imagery, and sudden outbursts of hysterical grotesquery recall Andrzej Żuławski’s THE DEVILS. Yet most of all it brings to mind the unlikely grouping of Woody Guthrie, Miklós Jancsó, and Akira Kuroswawa — or maybe Béla Tarr meets Sergio Leone. Whatever the comparisons, THE WIND IS WHISTLING UNDER THEIR FEET is a stirring, forgotten gem in classic Spectacle tradition.

QUIET CITY

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 – 7:30 to MIDNIGHT

Featuring short films/interdisciplinary collaborations between filmmakers, composers, performers, and visual artists.

Filmmakers: Johnny Siera, Gabriel Noguez, Ephraim Kirkwood, Greg McMullen
Composers: Luke Schwartz, Evan Joseph, Greg McMullen
Musicians: Greg McMullen, Sarah Mullins
Visual Artist: Jorge Velez .

BEST OF MIDNIGHTS ’17


MAGIC CRYSTAL (aka Mo fei cui)
dir. Jing Wong, 1986
95 min, Hong Kong
In Chinese with English subtitles
FRIDAY, JANUARY 5 – MIDNIGHT
SATURDAY, JANUARY 27 – MIDNIGHT

TICKETS HERE

A breakout hit at a recent FIST CHURCH screening, we’re pleased as punch to bring this uhhhh “loving homage” to films like E.T. and Indiana Jones but with 5000% more Cynthia Rothrock beatdowns.

Andy (Andy Lau), Pancho, and Pin Pin (an actual child named Bin Bin in real life) jet off to Greece to find Andys friend Shen after receiving an urgent message that his life is in danger. After a lengthy montage of them having A LOT of fun in Greece the come to find that sure enough the KGB and Interpol are chasing down Shen after learning of his discovery of an ancient artifact in the ruins. Pin Pin accidentally ends up with it and finds out that this is no ordinary hunk of jade but that it houses an alien who communicates via brain-waves. Pin Pin promises not to tell and the crystal grows a finger so they can pinky swear. Andy pairs up with Cindy (the inimitable Cynthia Rothrock) to track down the evil Karaov (Richard Norton star of GYMKATA which we have definitely never shown) who has vowed to do anything to get his hands on the treasure. Everyone ends up back in Greece for a showdown beneath the ruins as they navigate traps and tricks to return the crystal back to its rightful place – and…owner?

No exaggeration when we say that this film owes much to the work of Spielberg et al but these fight scenes are downright jaw-dropping. Fast, ferocious, and wonderfully filmed. If you missed this at FIST CHUCH now’s your chance to redeem yourself. Not to be missed!



THE SEVENTH CURSE (aka: Yuan Zhen-Xia yu Wei Si-Li)
dir. Ngai Choi Lam, 1986
78 min, Hong Kong
SATURDAY, JANUARY 6 – MIDNIGHT
SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 – MIDNIGHT

TICKETS HERE

For Dr. Yuan adventure has become a way of life – though not one he asked for. On a routine mission to pick up some of the herb that cures AIDS the good doctor stumbles across a tribe deep in the countryside of Thailand. Unfortunately for them, the evil priest of this “Worm Tribe” is in the middle of resurrecting Old Ancestor with a ghastly human sacrifice! Furious that his ritual as been interrupted the priest puts a blood curse on Dr. Yuan and he narrowly escapes with his life.

Now a year later he must travel back to Thailand with his pipe-smoking professor friend (Chow-Yun Fat in the ‘Wisely’ role – something of Hong Kong’s Indiana Jones) must travel back to reverse the curse before his seventh vein bursts in his heart and kills him. To do this they must use an artifact called Buddha’s Eye. Along the way (with intrepid reporter Maggie at their side) they’ll fight monks, walking skeletons, monsters, rolling boulders, and the film’s true star – a small ghost that flies into people and then makes them explode.

A smash hit from a recent FIST CHURCH screening (every other Sunday at 3PM) that had the audience stumbling around in the dark, using their phones as flashlights, trying to find their jaws on the floor. From the director of THE STORY OF RICKY this film truly has it all. Though very much a CATIII Indian Jones film it owes a debt of gratitude to a bouquet of other influences including 1979’s ALIEN. If you’ve never been to FIST CHURCH this is the type of high quality mystery entertainment you’ve been missing.



SCARLET STREET
dir. Fritz Lang, 1945.
USA, 102 min.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 12 – MIDNIGHT

TICKETS HERE

“How can a man be so dumb?”
The noir and the femme fatale will forever be bound together, merrily going to Hell, dragging all suckers, chumps, marks, rubes and shills into an endless abyss of suffering and death. As well they should! Noir, at its black heart, is about tearing a (seemingly) ordinary Joe to *nothing* while the audience howls for more. We’ll find that here, on SCARLET STREET, but with a director like Fritz Lang there’s more than one twist on the way to the noose. Based on Georges de La Fouchardière’s novel and play La Chienne (also the basis for the equally great Jean Renoir film by the same name), SCARLET STREET is, quite simply, one of the essential film noirs.

The great Edward G. Robinson plays Christopher Cross, the sap in question, at the end of a sad quarter-century of working as a cashier, enduring his wife and putting what little light still shines in him towards his painting hobby. Like most saps, Chris wants little more than to be some damsel’s white knight, and that chance actually arrives when he gets between va-va-va-voom Kitty (Joan Bennett, who was in everything from BULLDOG DRUMMOND to SUSPIRIA) and cheap hood Johnny (Dan Duryea of WINCHESTER ’73). Through a series of scams, lies, forgeries and tragedies, Chris and Kitty begin one of the darkest descents the screen has brought us, with Lang constantly, methodically twisting the knife, masterfully ratcheting up the tension all the way to the end. Fans of Lang’s earlier, more directly Expressionistic work like SPIES and the MABUSE films will find lots to love here, Robinson truly plays one of cinema’s great sad sacks, Joan Bennett is the embodiment of weaponized seduction, all combining to make a film absolutely perfect for a hot summer night when you can’t sleep and your soul cries for something, *anything* but the dreary monotony of our pointless lives. Great date film, too!



HEADLESS EYES
Kent Bateman, 1971
78 min, USA
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13 – MIDNIGHT

TICKETS HERE

You know how it is for starving artists, right? I mean, look at your clothes. Anyway, it used to be even harder! So hard that some of them turned to a life of crime. This is especially true in the case of Arthur Malcolm. Down on his luck, Arthur is caught robbing an apartment and loses his eye in the process. Once he’s healed he’s out on the streets and, brother, he is HEATED. Arthur sets about on a mad killing spree, gouging out the eyes of his victims with a spoon. He collects the eyes for his artwork, you see. This continues for some time with mixed results.

This film was directed by Kent Bateman, father of Jason and Justine, in the streets of a now long gone version of NYC. According to this film, it was a time when a hooker would approach a man covered in blood in the middle of the day in order to turn a trick. The good old days. In addition to this movie being totally batshit insane with a FIERCE mutant soundtrack, it’s a veritable snapshot of a city as nasty as they come. The performances are hammy and intense, like Easter dinner in a mental institution.



GALAXY DESTROYER
dir. Bret Piper, 1986
95 min, USA
In German w/ English subtitles
FRIDAY, JANUARY 19 – MIDNIGHT

TICKETS HERE

“I am the king, I am the king
One dead marine through the hatch
Scratch and scrape this heavenly body
Every inch of winning skin
There’s garbage in honeys sack again”

The Birthday Party, “Junkyard”

In GALAXY DESTROYER, veteran character actor Matt Mitler (THE MUTILATOR, BASKET CASE 2) plays Harry Trent – a role he would reprise two years later in Piper’s MUTANT WAR – a spy who steals a spaceship. While attempting to return to Earth, Harry finds the controls are malfunctioning and is unable to land… After a grueling five years in orbit, Harry comes back around and manages to descend to the planet’s fertile surface. But upon his return, Harry finds his beloved homeworld has been taken over… And while hailed as a hero and savior, he’s tasked with saving the way of life he once held so dear – if only he can figure out how.

A jack of all trades, director Brett Piper (A NYMPHOID BARBARIAN IN DINOSAUR HELL) cut his teeth in the early Eighties, and continues doing so to this day. Piper’s work truly shines when he’s able to showcase his love of practical effects; in GALAXY DESTROYER alone crab monsters, spaceships, and melting faces abound.



FATAL DEVIATION
Dir. Simon Linscheid, Shay Casserley, 1998.
Ireland. 76 min.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 26 – MIDNIGHT

TICKETS HERE

This was originally screened the weekend of Saint Patrick’s 2017, when we happily dragged Irish pride into the gutter. FATAL DEVIATION is back and it is still Ireland’s first (and only) feature-length martial arts film. Written, produced, cinematographed, cast by, stunt-coordinated, and starring James Bennett, the film tells the story of Jimmy Bennett (unrelated), a young man returning home after a long absence, his future uncertain, his father gone. After witnessing Jimmy’s takedown of local drug gang The Drug Lords Gang (featuring Mikey Graham, member of Ireland’s lone boy band BOYZONE), a monk belonging to the local church’s secret underground kung fu sect approaches with an offer to train Jimmy for the upcoming no-holds barred Bealtaine tournament.

As Jimmy learns the monk’s secret techniques of cutoff shorts tai-chi and kicking near small fires, The Drug Lords Gang increasingly pressures Jimmy to join them. When he refuses, the Drug Lords call ace fighter Seagull back from Hong Kong to take Jimmy out in the tournament. Jimmy’s only hope is mastering the FATAL DEVIATION, as taught by a man strongly resembling a drunk Led Zeppelin Hermit.

Filmed in the verdant backwater of Trim and featuring exactly one (completely unintentional) stunt, this is a film best witnessed in the safety of a group. Perhaps lacking in Irish wit and charm, FATAL DEVIATION can be enjoyed for what it is any night of the year.