Author: spectacletheater

SWASTIKA

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SWASTIKA
Dir. Philippe Mora, 1974.
UK. 95 min.
In German with English subtitles.

FRIDAY, MARCH 3 – 7:30 PM
THURSDAY, MARCH 9 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, MARCH 21 – 10 PM
MONDAY, MARCH 27 – 10 PM

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“If Hitler is dehumanized and shown only as a devil, any future Hitler may not be recognized, simply because he is a human being.”

So reads the opening titles of Philippe Mora’s SWASTIKA, a statement that perhaps has never been more pertinent than in the world of 2017.  Released in 1974, the documentary has only recently been freed from a ban in Germany that lasted until 2010. Artfully pieced together from COLOR home movies (shot by Eva Braun & her sister), propaganda reels, footage of massive rallies, and german newsreels, SWASTIKA provides a never-before-seen glimpse into the private and public life of Hitler, his cohorts, and the willing country they led into the deepest fires of hell.

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One can only watch with a fascination that is laced with dread, a feeling that finally gives way to the crushing weight of history. What emerges from underneath the rubble of disbelief, is perhaps the greatest lesson we can hope to learn from history: That evil is not so easily recognized, that it can rise to unimaginable heights with the polite and orderly cooperation of ordinary people, that it lurks behind the banality of the everyday.

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THE EXCLUDED

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THE EXCLUDED
Dir. Franz Novotny, 1982.
Austria, 93 min.
In German with English subtitles.

SUNDAY, MARCH 5 – 5 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 11 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, MARCH 17 – 10 PM
MONDAY, MARCH 20 – 7:30 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 25 – 7:30 PM
THURSDAY, MARCH 30 – 7:30 PM

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A forgotten gem of Austrian miserablist cinema, THE EXCLUDED is a prime example of agit-prop farce, the same strange brew stewed by Godard in LA CHINOIS and Fassbinder in THE THIRD GENERATION. This is the story of four bourgois would-be revolutionaries, attempting to smash the 1950s Austrian state—if they can overcome their own egos long enough to pull it off. The lead, Peter, is played with smarmy, wet-mouthed pretension by the great Paulus Manker, a regular collaborator with Michael Haneke. We’ve all met someone like Peter before: that poetry-writing, Camus-spouting punk, peeking above a black turtleneck long enough to spew half-baked Maoist homilies about the kind of violent political action he’s a teensy bit too scared to carry out himself. Surprisingly, Peter manages to form his own private fraktion of bored teenagers, and the cell happily engages in beatings, bombings, and shock tactics against “slaves of social convention.”

That is how post-war Austria looked to then-33-year-old director Franz Novotny—an urban underclass, politically at odds with the values of Austria’s hypocritical “Second Republic,” unable to share its wealth, and eager to enforce violent punishment for its fascist past. His film, based on the 1980 novel by Nobel winner Elfriede Jelinek, is a cynical portrait of Austria’s doomed, post-war youth, whose undirected political energy ultimately finds a conclusion with an explosion of meaningless violence.

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MATCH CUTS PRESENTS: ALEX MAR’S AMERICAN MYSTIC

MATCHCUTS_banner_Mar2017AMERICAN MYSTIC
dir. Alex Mar, 2010.
USA, 80 min.
English.

TUESDAY, MARCH 28 – 7:30 PM
DIRECTOR ALEX MAR IN ATTENDANCE! *ONE NIGHT ONLY!*

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Spectacle Theater is excited to collaborate with critical platform Match Cuts on a new series of screenings.  Scroll down for more information on Match Cuts.

“Set against the rich, color-soaked backdrop of America’s rural landscapes, Alex Mar’s lyrical documentary braids together the stories of three young Americans who have chosen to sacrifice comforts in order to embrace the fringes of alternative religion. The subjects include Chuck, a Lakota Sioux sundancer in the badlands of South Dakota; Morpheus, a Pagan priestess living off the grid in northern California’s old mining country; and Kublai, a Spiritualist medium in the former revivalist district of upstate New York.

In the radical, separatist spirit of early America, each has extracted themselves from the mainstream in order to live immersed in their faith and to seize a different way of life. Mar takes a personal, visually lush approach, enveloping the viewer in the subjects’ experience of their controversial faiths through their own words, their rituals, and the sprawling, majestic imagery that makes up each of their worlds.

Director Alex Mar is also the author of Witches of America, which was inspired by and features some of the subjects of this film. Signed paperbacks will be available at the screening.

The movie was produced by Mar and Nicholas Shumaker, and edited by Andy Grieve (Errol Morris’s Standard Operating Procedure, Alex Gibney’s Going Clear). It features cinematography by Gregory Mitnick and a score by composer Nathan Larson (formerly of the band Shudder to Think).”

Match Cuts is a weekly podcast centered on video, film and the moving image. Match Cuts Presents is dedicated to presenting de-colonialized cinema, LGBTQI films, Marxist diatribes, video art, dance films, sex films, and activist documentaries with a rotating cast of presenters from all spectrums of the performing and plastic arts and surrounding humanities. Match Cuts is hosted by Nick Faust and Kachine Moore.

CATFIGHT

Catfight_bannerCATFIGHT
dir. Onur Tukel, 2016.
US. 96 min.

FRIDAY, MARCH 3 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 4 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, MARCH 5 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, MARCH 6 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, MARCH 7 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, MARCH 9 – 7:30 PM

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*New York Premiere!*
Q&As with Special Guests!

Spectacle is pleased to present the New York premiere and limited theatrical run of local cult filmmaker Onur Tukel’s bloody satire CATFIGHT, coming off of its knockout premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Two former college friends, who now find themselves in very different walks of life, meet up at a fancy cocktail party: Veronica (Sandra Oh) has become the entitled, wine-loving wife of a rich businessman, while Ashley (Anne Heche), along with her lover Lisa (Alicia Silverstone), struggles to make ends meet as an artist. As the two women reconnect, long-buried hostilities, jealousy, and anger explode into a vicious fight that leaves both of them battered and bruised – and ready for more.

CATFIGHT is a brutally hilarious story of two bitter rivals whose grudge match spans a lifetime.

“CATFIGHT blends the sublime and absurd with the concise lunacy of a Kurt Vonnegut novel.”
-Eric Kohn, Indiewire

 

 

 

FEBRUARY MIDNIGHTS


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NIGHTSTICK
dir. Joseph L. Scanlan, 1987
USA/Canada, 95 minutes
English.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4 – MIDNIGHT
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9 – 10 PM *PRIME TIME!*
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17 – MIDNIGHT

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A cop tries to prevent a gang of extortionists from blowing up New York City with nitroglycerin in this movie about a cop who tries to prevent a gang of extortionists from BLOWING UP NEW YORK CITY WITH NITROGLYCERIN. This made-for-TV US/Canadian co-production, which is about a cop who tries to prevent a gang of extortionists from blowing up New York City with nitroglycerin, features Robert Vaughan, Leslie Neilsen and John Veron, and is about a cop who tries to prevent a gang of extortionists from blowing up New York City with nitroglycerin.



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SELF DEFENSE
Dir. Paul Donovan, 1983
Canada, 84 min.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11 – MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24 – MIDNIGHT

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In the Canadian vigilante epic SELF DEFENSE, gang members take advantage of a Halifax police strike to go on a gay bashing rampage, but when they besiege an apartment complex, the residents fight back with booby traps and, yes, self-defense. It’s a near-future Nova Scotian bloodbath in the tradition of DEATH WISH 3 and HOME ALONE. From Paul Donovan, director of video store staple DEF-CON 4 and the unpopular sci-fi series LEXX.



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CONFESSIONS OF A POLICE CAPTAIN
(aka CONFESSIONE DI UN COMMISSARIO DI POLIZIA AL PROCURATORE DELLA REPUBBLICA)
Dir. Damiano Damiani
Italy, 101 min.
In Italian with English subtitles

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10 – MIDNITE 

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“One of these days you’ll turn on the tap and blood will run out.”

Commissario Bonavia (Martin Balsam, in a role originally planned for Ben Gazarra, which is easy to imagine) is the titular police captain, willing to go outside the law to prosecute those protected by the Mafia, whose presence is everywhere, perverting justice to its ends. This is the mob as a Catholic force of evil, a presence which can kill from a distance, an endless network of paid politicians and crooked cops. At his side is Deputy D.A. Traini, played by the equally great Franco Nero (where do you even start with Nero), with elegance to spare, until Certainly a must for polizioteschi fans, though far more in the vein of INVESTIGATION OF A CITIZEN UNDER SUSPICION than, say, LIVE LIKE A COP DIE LIKE A MAN. Director Damiano Damiani (who brought us the insane LA STREGA IN AMORE, A BULLET FOR THE GENERAL and AMITYVILLE 2: THE POSSESSION!) knows exactly how best to play the corruption in which our antagonists find themselves: inescapable, fundamental, and ultimately victorious.

Featuring a jaw-dropping score by master Riz Ortolani, it’s a film perfectly suited to an age where a corrupt politician aided by a diabolical force rewards cronies and lackeys the same as enemies and anyone who stands against them: violent retribution.



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THE EVOLUTION OF SNUFF
Dir. Andrzej Kostenko, Karl Martine, Wes Craven (will explain below), 1979
West Germany, 79 min.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3 – MIDNIGHT
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18 – MIDNIGHT

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“The death of the soul begins when the human being no longer sees any sense in his existence.”

There is a certain type of documentary, often German, that combines public domain footage of lurid crimes interwoven with a lurid if muddled primary story line, then overlaid with deadpan narration to make some sort of existential point about the ruination of society. It’s close to a Mondo film, close to underground sleaze, close to a scuzzier Making A Murderer/The Jinx, yet not quite any of those. There must be a German word for it. THE EVOLUTION OF SNUFF is a profoundly confusing example of this genre. Starting with pedophile Roman Polanski, not terribly long after the death of his wife, pontificating on that sad old chestnut: the snuff film. This leads us to believe what we’re going to see is a documentary about a film where a person is murdered on camera, right? Wrong! We get a making-of film about a wigged-out pornographic version of Lysistrata, which probably has some of you confused, until you learn the twist is instead of the solidarity of celibacy the women are going to screw the guys so much they have to submit to their whims. From here we go to a mix of William Kleinian absurdity counterbalanced by the relentlessly sardonic narration as things go from bad to weird to worse. Please stay for what might just be the most insane ending of a film ever, built around stolen outtakes from Last House On The Left! Bring a date! We dare you!

MATCH CUTS PRESENTS: BRADFORD KESSLER’S -1% w/ PAUL MORRISSEY’S WOMEN IN REVOLT

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Spectacle Theater is excited to collaborate with critical platform Match Cuts on a new series of screenings. Scroll down for more information on Match Cuts.

TUESDAY FEB 21 – 7:30 PM

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-1%
dir. Bradford Kessler, 2014.
USA, 6 min.

“-1% is a sex satire set in an Occupy-esque moment. A cynical world-weary female aristocrat who goes cruising for some ‘Washington Square Park’ idealistic boy. Mayhem ensues. Featuring: Ethel Clavicle, Colton Brock and Cyril Duval.”

WOMEN IN REVOLT
Dir. Paul Morrissey, 1971
USA, 97 min.

Featuring Candy Darling, Jackie Curtis, Holly Woodlawn and Jane Forth. With music by John Cale.

Three of the most indelible transgender icons of all time play militant feminists in this incredible film which is so much more than parody. Jackie Curtis and Holly Woodlawn have had it with men and their foul ways, so they join a militant feminist organization called PIG (Politically Involved Girls). Candy Darling is a wealthy socialite from Park Avenue (or Long Island – they can’t keep it straight) who they draw into the group to give it legitimacy, but it turns out that she’s having an incestuous relationship with her brother. Regardless, the three quickly become enemies: “I could just plunge a knife right into her back.” “Oh no, it’s too bloody!” “Well, I could do it and just not look.” Holly Woodlawn becomes a Bowery bum and Jackie Curtis can’t stop hiring male prostitutes, while Candy becomes a famous actress: ‘I’m sick of incest and lesbianism. I’m ready for Hollywood.’

After WOMEN IN REVOLT previewed on 59th Street, it was protested by a feminist organization, who mistook the film for a caricature of feminism rather than a caricature of the popular discourse around feminism, not to mention a caricature of traditional gender roles. Candy Darling reportedly declared, ‘Who do these dykes think they are anyway? Well, I just hope they all read Vincent Canby’s review in today’s Times. He said I look like a cross between Kim Novak and Pat Nixon. It’s true – I do have Pat Nixon’s nose.'”

Match Cuts is a weekly podcast centered on video, film and the moving image. Match Cuts Presents is dedicated to presenting de-colonialized cinema, LGBTQI films, Marxist diatribes, video art, dance films, sex films, and activist documentaries with a rotating cast of presenters from all spectrums of the performing and plastic arts and surrounding humanities. Match Cuts is hosted by Nick Faust and Kachine Moore, and produced by Meg Murnane.

LOVE MASSACRE

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LOVE MASSACRE (AI SHA)
Dir. Patrick Tam, 1981.
Hong Kong. 91 min.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 – 💔  7:30 PM  💔
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18 – 10 PM

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Hong Kong New Wave forerunner Patrick Tam’s second film LOVE MASSACRE was decried on release for its dissonant genre mashup and thin plot, entirely missing its beauty as a formal exercise in color and framing. The oversight is understandable – featuring two of Hong Kong’s most famous stars, Brigitte Lin and Charlie Chin (who, at the time of filming, were embroiled in a love-triangle scandal), audience expectations were set for a straightforward romance. Instead, the film’s split is blunt as its title implies, and after an initial San Francisco pas de quatre between young beauty Ivy (Lin), her obsessive (and ironically named) roommate Joy, Joy’s boyfriend Louie (Chin) and Joy’s brother Chiu Ching, the film follows Chiu Ching back to Hong Kong and into slasher territory. Promising to return and marry Ivy, Chiu Ching’s revealed to already have a wife, his former doctor in fact – Chiu Ching suffers from the same vague mental illness that destroyed his sister.Determined to be with Ivy at any cost, Chiu Ching hacks a bloody path back to her, holing up in her claustrophobic apartment building and taking on her housemates one by one.

Tam sees his first seven films “as exercises, as attempts at cinema, not as complete and accomplished works,” and of LOVE MASSACRE in particular that “the form and content are schizophrenic.” A hands-on perfectionist, Tam’s dismissal of his own film belies its clever use of genre. Brutal violence and obsession undercut traditional ‘love’ at every turn – despite good intentions, nice guy Louis rescues no one, and the love of a patient wife doesn’t save Chiu Ching. Tam’s San Francisco is strangely empty, with entire fields, bridges, highways and houses void of crowds, echoed by bookending shots of a lone desert trek. A feeling of isolation permeates, with characters hemmed in by objects. Tam’s right that the clunky dialogue is at odds with the gorgeous imagery – frequent Wong Kar-Wai collaborator William Chang uses a minimal color palette of blue, red, black and white in bold geometrics to create a De Stijl world characters pose in, where staging elicits emotions, not dialogue. The incongruous tension between lowbrow plot and high art, cool palette and fiery emotion, sudden gore and quiet interludes, make LOVE MASSACRE Tam’s most fascinating ‘failure’.

DESIRE WILL SET YOU FREE

Day 2

DESIRE WILL SET YOU FREE
dir. Yony Leyser, 2016.
Germany. 92 min.

2/24 7:30 PM
2/25 5 PM
2/26 7:30 PM

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New York Premiere Weekend
Q&A with Special Guests

The second film from director Yony Leyser, DESIRE WILL SET YOU FREE is a dizzying, vibrant guided tour contemporary Berlin seen from the point of view of two immigrants — an America writer and a Russian escort. DESIRE unravels the history of Berlin’s hedonistic queer underground, prodding into the unique subcultures of the landscape as the two travel through the perennial nightlife.

Featuring an über-large cast including Nina Hagen, Rosa von Praunheim, Peaches, and Blood Orange’s Dev Hynes (who also contributed music), this richly-detailed sensory overload made its US debut at Outfest last year.

Special thanks to Wavelength Pictures and Altered Innocence.

RIOT HOUR: INAUGURATION DAY 2017

Riot_hour_bannerRIOT HOUR: INAUGURATION DAY 2017
USA. Total runtime: 55 min.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11 – 10:00 PM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13 – 10:00 PM

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25 – MIDNIGHT

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A homespun assembly of clips from this past month’s historic Women’s March events and other protests in response to Donald Trump’s January 20th inauguration.

State Cities attendance (APPROX) Notes
 California Los Angeles 750,000 The Los Angeles Police Department stated that “well past” 100,000 people attended the march, but did not attempt to make a more specific estimate. Officials stated that the march was the largest in Los Angeles since a 2006 immigration march attended by 500,000 people.[75] The Los Angeles Daily News reported that 750,000 people were in the crowd.[76]Organizers also said that 750,000 people had participated in the march.[77]
500,000[2][3] Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe announced that he would attend the march instead of the inaugural parade. McAuliffe said he would be marching in Washington with his wife Dorothy, Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam and Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.[4] There were no arrests.[3]
 New York New York City 400,000 In Manhattan, hundreds of thousands marched. The rally began at Trump World Tower and One Dag Hammarskjold Plaza (near the Headquarters of the United Nations) and the march proceeded to Trump Tower, Trump’s home.[372][373] The Office of the Mayor of New York City announced that the number of attendees was over 400,000.[374][375]
 Illinois Chicago 250,000[212] Organizers for the sister march in Chicago, Illinois, initially prepared for a crowd of 22,000.[213] An estimated 250,000 protesters[214] gathered in Grant Park for an initial rally to be followed by a march, with attendance far more than expected.[215] As a result, the official march was cancelled, although marchers then flooded the streets of the Chicago Loop.[216] Liz Radford, an organizer, informed the crowd, “We called, and you came. We have flooded the march route. We have flooded Chicago.”[215]
 Washington Seattle 175,000[555] The Women’s March on Seattle march took place from Judkins Park to the Space Needle in Seattle, Washington. Participants filled the entire length of the 3.6-mile (5.8 km) route.[556][557] Sound Transit and King County Metro rerouted many bus routes and added additional Link light rail service in anticipation of disruption to the city’s transportation grid.[558]
 Massachusetts Boston 150,000–175,000[274][275][276] A women’s march took place at the Boston Common in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. United States Senators Elizabeth Warren and Ed Markey spoke to the crowd.[277] An estimated 150,000[276] to 175,000[278] people attended.
 California Oakland 100,000[84]
 California San Francisco 100,000–150,000[102][103] The rally was held at Civic Center Plaza, where San Francisco City Hall was lit pink in observance of the protest.[104] Performer and activist Joan Baez serenaded the crowd with “We Shall Overcome” in Spanish.[105]
 Colorado Denver 100,000–200,000[137] A protest occurred at the Civic Center.[137]
 Oregon Portland 100,000 People attended the Women’s March on Portland.[441]
 Minnesota St. Paul 90,000–100,000[314] People marched to the Minnesota State Capitol from various parts of the city. A spokesman for the St. Paul Police stated it was the largest protest in the city since the 2008 Republican National Convention.[315]
 Wisconsin Madison 75,000–100,000[576] The protest occurred around the Wisconsin State Capitol and along State Street in Madison.[576]

Media related to Madison Women’s March at Wikimedia Commons

 Georgia Atlanta 60,000[182] John Lewis attended the Atlanta rally, which saw more than 60,000 march to the Georgia State Capitol.[182]
 Pennsylvania Philadelphia 50,000[451][452] The event included an actual march from Logan Square to Eakins Oval, and a rally at Eakins Oval.[453]
 California San Diego 40,000–50,000 Two marches were held. One march in downtown San Diego had an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 attend, and another in neighboring San Marcos, California had an estimated 10,000 attend.[99][100] A march with 50 senior citizens took place at the Seacrest Village retirement center.[101]
 Texas Austin 40,000–50,000[484] The crowd gathered at the Texas State Capitol and marched through the streets of downtown Austin for the Women’s March on Austin. The Austin Police Department estimated that the crowd was about 40,000 to 50,000, becoming the largest march in Texas history.[485][486][487][488]
 Iowa Des Moines 26,000[242] The march near the Iowa State Capitol included women, men and children supporting women’s rights and healthcare, environmental issues, and immigration[242]
 California San Jose 25,000[106][107][104]
 North Carolina Charlotte 25,000[392] Lasting from 10 a.m. to noon, attendance was ten times what had been expected, according to event organizers.[393] Some participants came from surrounding communities, including Concord, Rock Hill and Indian Trail. Attendees included Mayor Jennifer Roberts, U.S. Rep. Alma Adams (D-Charlotte) and state Senator Jeff Jackson (D-Mecklenburg). According to the CMPD, the march was peaceful, with no arrests or disturbances reported.[394]
 Pennsylvania Pittsburgh 25,000[454] Marched through the city to Market Square.
 Texas Houston 22,000[502] Starting at the Sabine Street Bridge, protesters marched through downtown to Houston City Hall.[502][503] Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner spoke out during the event.[504]
 Arizona Phoenix 20,000[37] The march progressed from the Capitol south to Jefferson, east to 15th Avenue, north to Monroe Street, west to 17th Avenue and back to the Capitol. Speakers at rallies before and after the march included State Rep. Athena Salman (Tempe), U.S. Rep. Ruben Gallego, disability-rights activist Jennifer Longdon, who noted that moments after Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States, the White House website was overhauled to remove pages dedicated to disabilities, civil rights, and LGBT issues, Jodi Liggett, Planned Parenthood‘s vice president of public affairs, and Maricopa County Recorder Adrian Fontes.[37]
 California Sacramento 20,000[96] 20,000 Marched from Southside Park to the California State Capitol.
 California Santa Ana 20,000–25,000[111][69]
 Florida St. Petersburg 20,000+ Over 20,000 people marched in downtown St. Petersburg, making it the largest demonstration in the city’s history.[176][177]
 Vermont Montpelier 20,000[376] Bernie Sanders attended the event.[524]
 North Carolina Raleigh 17,000 People demonstrated peacefully at the Raleigh Women’s March. U.S. Representative David Price also attended.[400]
 Arizona Tucson 15,000[37][41][42] The demonstration was peaceful,[37] whith no incidents or arrests reported.[43]
 California Santa Cruz 15,000+[114] Several people commented that it was the largest march in Santa Cruz history.[115]
 Ohio Cleveland 15,000 Protesters gathered at Public Square and then marched through Downtown.[410]
 Tennessee Nashville 15,000+[479] Participants marched about one mile (1.6 km) through downtown Nashville. The march started at Cumberland Park near Nissan Stadium, crossed the Cumberland River on the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge, and ended at Public Square.[479]
 Florida Tallahassee 14,000+[178] Over 14,000 people of the capital’s communities showed up to protest. Despite forecasts for heavy rain, the crowd poured into the Railroad Square Arts location before marching up the road to the Florida A&M University Recreation center. Most of the protesters turned out for the march, and due to the small indoor venue, less than a tenth of those attending were able to view the speakers rally. This may be the largest protest in Florida’s capitol history.
 Missouri St. Louis 13,000 People marched peacefully in downtown St. Louis from Union Station to a rally at Luther Ely Smith Square.[322]
 Nebraska Omaha 12,000–14,000[329]
 Oklahoma Oklahoma City 12,000+ Demonstrations were held in front of the Oklahoma State Capitol.[418]
 Michigan Ann Arbor 11,000 Protesters rallied in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and attended a speech afterwards by U.S. Representative Debbie Dingell (pictured) on the University of Michigan campus.[290]
 California Walnut Creek 10,000[125] Streets were closed as thousands marched in downtown Walnut Creek. Speakers included Nancy Skinner, Eric Swalwell, Steve Glazer and Mark DeSaulnier.[125]
 Connecticut Hartford 10,000 The march had the support of Governor Dannel Malloy.[145][146]
 Florida Miami 10,000+ The demonstration at Bayfront Park in Miami, Florida reached capacity of more than 10,000 and demonstrators began flooding the streets.[166][167]
 Florida Sarasota 10,000 Author Stephen King participated in the march.[173]
 Louisiana New Orleans 10,000–15,000[254]
 Maine Augusta 10,000+[256] There were 5,000 people registered to attend the rally in Augusta. In fact, 10,000 people attended, making this the largest Women’s March in the state. The crowd assembled for speeches at the State House.[257]
 Maine Portland 10,000+ People marched in one of the largest protest marches ever held in Portland and drew far more people than expected. Portland police said the size of the orderly protest crowd was “of historic proportions”.[263]
 Michigan Lansing 10,000 Thousands gathered at the Michigan State Capitol in solidarity of all groups who have been marginalized by the actions of the man now leading this country.
 Missouri Kansas City 10,000[320] The demonstration was held at Washington Square Park in downtown Kansas City.[320]
 Montana Helena 10,000[323] People marched through the city and around the Montana State Capitol.[324][325]
 Nevada Reno 10,000[330] Protesters marched in Reno, Nevada.[332]
 New Mexico Albuquerque 10,000 Protesters rallied at the Civic Plaza.[354][355]
 New Mexico Santa Fe 10,000–15,000[359] Thousands of Santa Feans and other northern New Mexicans marched and held signs in a rally that surrounded the Roundhouse.[360]
 New York Ithaca 10,000 The demonstration began and ended on the Ithaca Commons.[370]
 New York Seneca Falls 10,000 The event started at the Women’s Rights National Historical Park, the Seneca Falls Convention, an early convention on women’s rights in 1848.[382]
 Washington Olympia 10,000[550][551]
 Tennessee Memphis 9,000+[478] Marchers gathered at the Judge D’Army Bailey Courthouse and marched 1.2 miles to the National Civil Rights Museum.
 Oregon Ashland 8,000[420] Ashland police estimated 8,000 participants in the Ashland Women’s March.[420][421]
 Utah Park City 8,000[517] Celebrities protested at the Sundance Film Festival against Trump and for women’s rights. One of the messages was “Love Trumps Hate”. Celebrities in attendance included Charlize Theron, Kristen Stewart, John Legend, Kevin Bacon, Chelsea Handler, and Benjamin Bratt. It was supported by Justice Party, Planned Parenthood Association of Utah, Equality Now, Sentry Financial, and other organizations.[518]
 Washington Spokane 8,000[560]
 Arkansas Little Rock 7,000[47][48] Protesters marched to the Arkansas State Capitol Building.
 California San Luis Obispo 7,000–10,000[108] Protesters marched through downtown.[109]
 Colorado Colorado Springs 7,000[133] People marched through downtown Colorado Springs.[133]
 New York Albany 7,000+ A crowd of 7,000 exceeded the initial prediction of 2,000.[361]
 North Carolina Asheville 7,000–10,000[389] A women’s march took place in downtown Asheville, North Carolina. The march began at Park Square and then moved throughout downtown Asheville. Estimated attendance is between 7,000 and 10,000 people making it the largest assembly in Asheville since 2013.[390]
 Ohio Cincinnati 7,000+[408] The Women’s March started at noon at Washington Park, and after representatives from several civic groups spoke, the march started towards City Hall, and back to Washington Park.[409]
 Oregon Eugene 7,000+ 7,000 participate in women’s March in Eugene.[429]
 California Santa Barbara 6,000 More than 6,000 protestors rallied in De La Guerra Plaza. Both women and men participated.[112][113]
 New Jersey Asbury Park 6,000 Protesters marched in Asbury Park, New Jersey.[341] Singer/songwiter Patti Scialfa attended the march as did U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone.[342]
 New Jersey Trenton 6,000–7,500 Protesters marched from an overflowing rally in and around the Trenton War Memorial auditorium to another rally outside the State House.[350][351][352]
 Utah Salt Lake City[521] 5,700[522]
 Alabama Birmingham 5,000–10,000[5] The march started at Kelly Ingram Park.[6]
 California Eureka 5,000–8,000[59][60] Thousands Flood Eureka’s Streets in Solidarity With Women’s March on Washington[59] Thousands Gather for Women’s March on Eureka[60]
 California Redwood City 5,000 The rally was “inspired by and held in solidarity with” Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington, organizers said. Joan Baez performed and Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Menlo Park, and state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo spoke.[92]
 California Santa Rosa 5,000 People marched through downtown Santa Rosa. Former representative Lynn Woolsey and Representative Jared Huffman spoke.[116]
 Connecticut Stamford 5,000 People marched peacefully in Stamford, Connecticut, after a rally in the Mill River Park.[152] The protesters marched around the city blocks surrounding the Trump Parc Stamford building, a building owned by the Trump Organization,[153] in a display of resistance to President Donald Trump’s policies. The number of demonstrators was reportedly four times larger than organizers expected.[152]
 Florida West Palm Beach 5,000–7,000[179][180] The event was at the Meyer Amphitheatre.[156]
 Idaho Boise 5,000[199] The march took place in initially heavy snow that turned to rain.
 Illinois Champaign-Urbana 5,000[211] 5,000 people gathered at West Side Park in downtown Champaign.
 Kentucky Lexington 5,000[248]
 Kentucky Louisville 5,000[249] People showed up at Louisville’s Metro Hall for The Rally To Move Forward in Louisville, Kentucky.[249] Congressman John Yarmuth from Louisville was scheduled to speak.[250]
 Maryland Baltimore 5,000[269] A sister women’s march took place outside of Johns Hopkins University in North Baltimore. Notable figures included former Maryland Senator Paul Sarbanes and State’s Attorney for Baltimore Marilyn Mosby.[270]Additional marchers en route to Washington, D.C., were lined up around the block at Pennsylvania Station waiting for MARC express trains to Union Station.
 Nevada Las Vegas 5,000+[330] People marched from East Fremont Street, south on Las Vegas Boulevard to outside the Lloyd D. George Federal District Courthouse.[331]
 New York Poughkeepsie 5,000 The march took place on the Walkway over the Hudson.[379]
 Oregon Bend 5,000[424] A rally was held at Drake Park followed by a rally through Downtown.[425]
 Rhode Island Providence 5,000 The R.I. Women’s Solidarity Rally was held on the Rhode Island State House lawn. Governor Gina Raimondo participated.[464][465] Young people from Classical High School spoke to the crowd.
 Texas Fort Worth 5,000–9,000[498] The march began at the Tarrant County Courthouse and moved down Main and back up Houston Street. This was a Unity march that organizers say gives voice to people from “every cross-section of culture”.[499][500][501]
 Washington Bellingham 5,000 to 10,000[539]
 Indiana Indianapolis 4,500–5,000[227] The protest at the Indiana State Capitol[228] is the largest rally in recent memory.[229]
 Kansas Topeka 4,200[245][246]
 California Riverside 4,000 Thousands marched along the Downtown Main Street Mall.[94][95]
 Michigan Detroit 4,000 People protested at the campus of Wayne State University in Midtown Detroit.[293][294]
 Virginia Roanoke 4,000[532] Estimates from crowd higher.[533]
 Alaska Anchorage 3,500[12][13] Thousands protested at the Delaney Park Strip.[12]
 South Dakota Sioux Falls 3,300[473]
 Florida Key West 3,200 Crowds marched down Duval Street to Mallory Square. Marion County Commissioner Heather Carruthers spoke at the event and organizer Jamie Mattingly led the crowds in a rendition of John Lennon’s Imagine.[163][164]
 California Napa 3,000+[82] Protesters lined up roads in downtown Napa.
 California San Marcos 3,000–10,000[110][100]
 California Sonoma 3,000 Marchers proceeded around the historic Sonoma Plaza, blocking traffic for over an hour.[117]
 Hawaii Honolulu (Oahu) 3,000–8,000[189][190] Thousands of people marched.[191]
 Hawaii Kona 3,000–3,500[196]
 Kansas Wichita 3,000 Protesters marched to City Hall.[247]
 Michigan Traverse City 3,000[303]
 New Hampshire Portsmouth 3,000–5,000[339]
 New York Binghamton 3,000 The march was held downtown and exceeded initial estimates for the event.[362]
 North Carolina Greensboro 3,000–6,000 Downtown Greensboro[395]
 North Carolina Wilmington 3,000[401] A Women’s March on Washington sister event was held in Wilmington, NC. Taking place at the intersection of Third and Princess streets, the rally began at 10 am and was attended by between 1,000 and 1,500 participants.[402]
  North Dakota Fargo < 3,000[405]
 Ohio Columbus 3,000 Protesters gathered at the Ohio State House.[411]
 Ohio Dayton 3,000 Protesters rallied at the Courthouse Square.[412]
 Tennessee Chattanooga 3,000[475]
 Texas Dallas 3,000–7,000,[493]10,000[494] Marchers gathered at City Hall and marched through downtown, Deep Ellum and East Dallas.[493]
 West Virginia Charleston 3,000[566]
 California Fort Bragg 2,500–2,800[61]
 California Ventura 2,500[122][123]
 Florida Naples 2,500 Protesters gathered at Cambier Park and then marched through the streets.[168]
 Idaho Moscow 2,500+ Titled “Women’s March on the Palouse“, the event was centered in Moscow, ID near Washington State University and University of Idaho. The march started at Moscow City Hall and ended at East City Park.[204]
 New York Buffalo 2,500–3,000 A march in Niagara Square drew demonstrators and local politicians.[363]
 Pennsylvania Erie 2,500[447] A demonstration was held in Penn Square.
 Texas Denton 2,500[495] A United Denton organized the Women’s March to be held in Denton, Texas. The downtown square was packed by 12:30 pm.[494]
 Alaska Fairbanks 2,000[18] People rallied in subzero temperatures.[12]
 California Fresno 2,000[62] Protesters gathered at an intersection in North Fresno.[62]
 California Ukiah 2,000 Attendees gathered at Alex R. Thomas Jr. Plaza. Joelle Schultz, director of Ukiah’s Planned Parenthood, address the crowd along with local activists.[120]
 Florida Jacksonville 2,000–3,000[161] Thousands marched through the streets to the Jacksonville Landing.[162]
 Florida Pensacola 2,000[172] A demonstration was held at the Plaza de Luna.
 Florida St. Augustine 2,000+[174] Marchers walked across Bridge of Lions and a rally was held in the Plaza de la Constitucion.[175]
 Massachusetts Greenfield 2,000+[280]
 Missouri Columbia 2,000 Participants marched from Courthouse Plaza through downtown.
 Missouri Springfield 2,000+ People marched to Park Central Square in downtown Springfield. The parade made its way from the parking lot at Springfield’s municipal court building, across the Martin Luther King Jr. Bridge and over to Park Central Square where several speakers addressed the crowd. The rally touched on political issues in addition to women’s rights. One speaker, Bethany Johnson, a transgender woman, spoke and drew some of the loudest cheers. She also mentioned the 2015 vote that repealed the city’s ordinance banning LGBT discrimination in the workplace. Johnson banged the podium and called on the marchers to contact their politicians.[321]
 Nebraska Lincoln 2,000–3,000[327] Approximately 2,000 to 3,000 people gathered outside the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Student Union. 40 members of the fraternity Phi Gamma Delta held a counter protest by waving Trump flags off their balcony.
 New York Hudson 2,000–3,000[369]
 New York Port Jefferson 2,000[377]
 New York Syracuse 2,000 Over 2,000 people gathered at the James Hanley Federal Building.[383]
 Oregon Salem 2,000 Governor Kate Brown participated in the march.[442]
 Pennsylvania Doylestown 2,000[446] Organizers began planning 6 days before originally anticipating 300 or less attendees.
 South Carolina Charleston 2,000+ The Charleston Women’s March began as a convey from nine parking garages downtown and converged at Brittlebank Park at noon. More than 2,000 attended this peaceful rally.[467]
 South Carolina Columbia 2,000–3,000 “Stand Up” rally for women’s rights and social issues attended by 2,000–3,000 was held in Columbia, South Carolina. The participants gathered at the South Carolina State House grounds and marched to the Music Farm.[469]
 South Carolina Greenville 2,000 A peaceful rally was held at the Falls Park amphitheater in Greenville from noon until 2 pm. Attendance was estimated at 2,000.[468]
 Tennessee Knoxville 2,000 An assembly was held in Market Square.[477]
 Virginia Norfolk 2,000 Two groups marched separately with similar messages.[528] Both groups eventually joined up to complete the march together.[citation needed]
 Virginia Richmond 2,000[531]
 Washington Walla Walla 2,000[554]
 Washington Wenatchee < 2,000[564]

[ + hundreds more. Full list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_2017_Women%27s_March_locations]

EVERY DESIRE: MAI ZETTERLING

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Despite decades as an international actress and twenty-odd filmmaking credits, Mai Zetterling remains a short entry in academic encyclopedias and references to feminist cinema. Zetterling identified her filmmaking as characteristically Swedish, describing it as a relentless search for truth through “self-analysis… perhaps too much”. The truths she brings to the screen are those of familial neuroses, powerful women, gay desire, and quests for authentic artistry. Critics of her films have cheered her craft, but complain of a lack of connection to her main characters. That critique does not take a wide view: most of her protagonists are in the grips of powerful memories, experiencing flashbacks and psychic disorientation. This approach to subjectivity erodes the stable identity of the individual, who is vexed and tortured by past experiences, sometimes unable to move on. We are no more distant from these characters as they are from themselves, seeing the truth of their un-sublimated desires.



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NIGHT GAMES (NATTLEK)
dir. Mai Zetterling, 1966
Sweden, 105 min.
In Swedish with English Subtitles

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 – 10 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23 – 10 PM

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This movie is a delightfully Swedish version of camp: a self-indulgent heiress houses a coterie of outsiders who party as she gives birth in a gigantic gown. Her son Jan, aged around ten, lounges around the estate and escapes reality through games with a dear old aunt. He tries to lure his mother’s affection through cross-dressing and sexual desire. We see these scenes as rich flashbacks: as an adult Jan is trapped in his neuroses and unable to grow up. John Waters said in Film Comment that NATTLEK was “one of the first films to feature incredibly realistic vomiting” and it famously caused Shirley Temple to resign from the board of the San Francisco Film Festival.



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SCRUBBERS
dir. Mai Zetterling
UK, 1982

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26 – 5 PM

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Anyone who has spent any time in an all-girls education, mental or punitive institution will find that Zetterling has captured many essential elements in SCRUBBERS from 1982. SCRUBBERS was the female answer to SCUM, Alan Clarke’s 1979 graphic drama about a boy’s borstal. Zetterling’s film is more colorful and emotional, involving lesbian relationships, separation from children, and self-harm. There is also plenty of fighting, swaggering, glue-sniffing and bawdy singing. The most iconic scene evokes TITICUT FOLLIES, when the borstal performs a variety show under the banner “Hellhole Bitches: Therapeutic Entertainment from the Psycho Freaks”. Featuring 80’s anarcho-pop star Honey Bane.



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AMOROSA
dir. Mai Zetterling, 1986.
Sweden, 117 min.
In Swedish and Italian with English Subtitles.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12 – 5 PM
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25 – 10 PM 

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This is the second of Zetterling’s films concerning the life and work of Agnes von Krusenstjerna, the first being 1964’s LOVING COUPLES. Krusenstjerna is a Swedish noblewoman who published daring books of literature in the 1920’s. It is a biopic portrait, showing first her descent into hysteria in a strange Italian hospital and going back through the events in her life that led to this point. Some stylistic elements of this film are tacky, however the story surges on the strength of Stina Ekblad’s acting. The portrayal of a writer resisting the expectations of noble life is beautifully expressed, and her descent into madness is both tragic and revulsive.

Thank you to Sandrew Metronome for a beautiful copy of this film.