JANE: AN ABORTION SERVICE


JANE: AN ABORTION SERVICE

dir. Kate Kirtz and Nell Lundy, 1996
United States, 58 min.
In English.

FRIDAY, MARCH 27 – 7:30 PM
ONE NIGHT ONLY!
(This event is $10)

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

100% of ticket sales will go to Access Reproductive Care – Southeast, an Atlanta-based service providing financial and logistical support for those in need of abortions in six southeastern states.

This fascinating political look at a little-known chapter in women’s history tells the story of “Jane”, the Chicago-based women’s health group who performed nearly 12,000 safe illegal abortions between 1969 and 1973 with no formal medical training.

Special thanks to Women Make Movies.

DO YOU KNOW WHERE YOUR GIRLS ARE?

Burning rubber? Taking names? Climbing the social ladders of the Brooklyn organized crime scene? These women (gasp) do it all. Alternating between the schlock and the subversive, the films included in this series are best enjoyed with your own clique of delinquents, punks and biker toughs.

Special thanks to byNWR, G.B. Jones, Vtape, and AGFA.



CHAINED GIRLS
dir. Joseph P. Marwa, 1965
United States, 65 min.
In English.

SATURDAY, MARCH 7 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, MARCH 15 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Presented by byNWR

In contemporary times, sleaze documentarian Marwa’s expose of the secret lives of New York lesbians plays best wryly and tongue-and-cheek (and occasionally laugh out loud). This anthropological oddity is shot verité-style on the Greenwich Village streets, drastically underexposed, an amateurish eventide tour of mid-60s New York with the mysterious Sapphics as our guide. byNWR’s recent incredible restoration preserves an unforgettable pre-Stonewall curio.

screening with

THE YO-YO GANG
dir. G.B. Jones, 1992
Canada, 30 min.
In English.

Flash forward thirty years, to queercore Toronto, where Fifth Column’s G.B. Jones unleashed the furiously gritty punk opus Yo-Yo Gang, following a turf war between the titular girl clique and their nemeses, The Skateboard Bitches.



TEENAGE GANG DEBS
dir. Sande N. Johnson, 1966
United States, 72 min.
In English.

FRIDAY, MARCH 6 – 10 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11 – 7:30 PM

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“No one’s gonna cut me up, pigface!” growls no-goodnik Terry (Diane Conti), fresh in Brooklyn from Manhattan and vying to wrest control of the Brooklyn-based Rebels. An operatic teen movie full of brawls on the open Brooklyn streets, Teenage Gang Debs has a rightful rep as one of the most fun films in its genre.



GIRL GANG
dir. Robert C. Derteno, 1954
United States, 64 min.
In  English.

MONDAY, MARCH 16 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, MARCH 23 – 10 PM

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A prime cut of 1950s cautionary schlock, Girl Gang chronicles the downfall of a group of teens who fall under the drug-addled sway of gangster kingpin. Funded by roadshow maestro George Weiss, who also funded Ed Wood’s films as well as Chained Girls, this z-grade relic was rescued from obscurity by Something Weird.



SHE-DEVILS ON WHEELS
dir. Herschell Gordon Lewis, 1968
United States, 88 min.
In English.

FRIDAY, MARCH 6 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, MARCH 15 – 5 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18 -10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Presented by the America Genre Film Archive.

Gore god Gordon Lewis gives girl gangs a go in this mean and nasty 1968 exploitation flick following the exploits of The Man-Eaters; biker chicks reigning over a Florida town. They race their bikes weekly on an airport tarmac, endowing the winner with “first pick from the stud line”. Shot in Miami (and reportedly starring actual motorcycle toughs), She-Devils is as colorful as exploitation films get.

WOMEN’S PUNK ART MAKING PARTIES

The word “collective” brings to mind infinite potentials — an unlimited number of practices towards horizontality within an artistic ecosystem. Some of these practices are more tenable than others, but throughout history activist-minded artists have collectivized in an effort to change what the economic, social and political model of making arts looks like. From West Berlin to DC, the Second Wave to riot grrrl, we present a cross-section of female artists coming together in times of political need.

Organized with Mary Billyou. Special thanks to Kristen Fitzpatrick, WMM, Filmmaker’s Co-op, K8 Hardy, Wynne Greenwood, Facets, and Meredith Drum.



WOMEN’S PUNK ART MAKING PARTY
Dir. Mary Billyou, 1996.
United States, 33 min.
In English.

SATURDAY, MARCH 21 – 7:30 PM w/director Mary Billyou in person
THURSDAY, MARCH 26 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, MARCH 29 – 7:30 PM

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A documentary in which a group of young women meet for an art-making party. Located at The Beehive Collective in Washington, DC, six individual episodes are loosely interspersed, allowing each participant a chance to represent themselves. Included: a feminist stripper preparing for work, a puppet show, and a music video.

screening with

SHE HAD HER GUN ALL READY
dir. Vivienne Dick, 1978.
United States, 28 min.
In English.

Vivienne Dick takes aim a reverence and power dynamics among women in one of her best known shorts, an 8mm Lower East Side-set psychodrama starring Lydia Lunch.

and

NEW REPORT ARTIST UNKNOWN
dir. K8 Hardy, Wynne Greenwood, 2006
United States, 16 min.
In English.

A collaborative project envisioning a news service in a post-feminist world, this comedic short features K8 Hardy (founder of the queer feminist art collective LTTR) and Wynne Greenwood (of Tracy and the Plastics) playing Henry Irigaray and Henry Stein-Acker-Hill, an anchor and roving correspondent for WKRH, a feminist TV news station whose tagline is “pregnant with information.”



THE ALL-AROUND REDUCED PERSONALITY
(aka DIE ALLSEITIG REDUZIERTE PERSÖNLICHKEIT)
dir. Helke Sander, 1979
Germany, 98 min.
In German with English subtitles.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 7 – 10 PM 
THURSDAY, MARCH 19 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

“Emancipation or not, you want to sell a story.”

Threatened by the increasing cost of living (not to mention of producing images), a women’s photography collective attempts to subvert a commission given to them by the politically and sexually repressive West German government. Drifting from private moments to Godardian accounting, urban survey to bureaucratic detentes, Sanders probes the possibility of reintegrating art into social space as a means of ending grey-on-grey capitalism and socialism, two sides of the same valueless coin.



UNDER THE PAVEMENT LIES THE STRAND
(aka UNTER DEM PFLASTER IST DER STRAND)
dir. Helma Sanders-Brahms, 1975
Germany, 99 min.
In German with English subtitles.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12 – 10 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, MARCH 27 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

A sociological document on the working woman and abortion, an anti-matrimonial and anti-utopian communist manifesto, Unter dem Pflaster is an intimate chronicle of post-68 malaise and the growing schism between sexual and political revolutions. An illicit and ludic affair between two actors with a shared past in the student rebellions opens up onto the history of German revolution and fascism, the constraints of domestic monogamy and claustrophobia of private property, as they watch themselves become the very parents they mutinied against. Caught at a crux of early postmodernity, Sanders-Brahms pinpoints the exigency of a women’s movement in the stale husk of ’68 macho militancy and growing recuperation in post-Fordist women’s reformism.



THE HERETICS
dir. Joan Braderman, 2009
United States, 95 min.
In English.

TUESDAY, MARCH 3 -7:30 PM
SUNDAY, MARCH 29 – 5 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Presented by Women Make Movies

Tracing the influence of the Women’s Movement’s Second Wave on art and life, THE HERETICS is the exhilarating inside story of the New York feminist art collective that produced “Heresies: A Feminist Publication on Art and Politics” (1977-92). On the road with her camera crew from New Mexico to Italy, Braderman reconnects with 28 other group members, including writer/critic Lucy Lippard, architect Susanna Torre, filmmaker Su Friedrich, and artists Ida Applebroog, Mary Miss, Miriam Schapiro, and Cecilia Vicuña. — WMM

“Upbeat and affirmative…The stories these women tell envision a radically different moment in art-world history, one in which questions of career and market are barely mentioned, and philosophical arguments are firmly grounded in street-level politics.” — Ed Halter, ARTFORUM



WOMANHOUSE
dir. Johanna Demetrakas, 1974
United States, 47 min.
In English.

MONDAY, MARCH 9 – 10 PM 
MONDAY, MARCH 23 – 7:30 PM 
THURSDAY, MARCH 26 – 10 PM 

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Presented by Women Make Movies

WOMANHOUSE is an historic documentary about one of the most important feminist cultural events of the 1970s. Judy Chicago (best-known as the creator of THE DINNER PARTY) and Miriam Shapiro rented an old Hollywood mansion and altered its interior through decor and set-pieces to “search out and reveal the female experience…the dreams and fantasies of women as they sewed, cooked, washed and ironed away their lives.”

screening with

TAKING RESIDENCE: A HISTORY OF AIR GALLERY
dir. Meredith Drum, 2012
United States, 16 min.
In English.

A short documentary about the first non-profit, all-women’s gallery in the U.S., AIR Gallery, founded in 1972 in downtown New York City. This documentary was made on the occasion of a history show about AIR at Fales Library and the Tracey / Barry Gallery at New York University.

CONTROL FREAKS

A trio of horror films about controlling, overbearing, downright awful children.



THE PIT
dir. Lew Lehman, 1981
Canada, 96 min
In English.

FRIDAY, MARCH 13 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 21 – MIDNIGHT

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Left with a baby sitter, a bad boy with a teddy bear finds a pit with four hungry monsters.

The most cartoonish of the trilogy is also somehow, occasionally, the most unsettling. Jamie, as played by Sammy Snyders in his second-to-last credit (right behind ‘The Littlest Hobo’), is an obnoxious, cringey, and entirely too horny pre-teen with parents who coddle him and his ‘unique’ behavior as he burns through babysitters who can’t handle him. Oh, did we mention he also has a teddy bear who talks to him, and has also found a pit full of ‘friends’ in the woods?

Tonal shifts abound as Jamie’s increasing(ly uncomfortable) attraction to his new babysitter Sandy curdles into rage at her and everyone who’s ever bullied him. The less you know the better, but The Pit is certainly a ride worth taking.



THE CHILD
dir. Robert Voskanian, 1977
US, 82 min
In English.

SATURDAY, MARCH 7 – MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY, MARCH 13 – MIDNIGHT
MONDAY, MARCH 30 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

A 1930’s widower hires a governess for his daughter, who can summon zombies.

Almost the polar opposite of The Pit despite very similar synopses, The Child is a distinctly moodier and more serious affair. Alicianne is en route to her new job as the governess to a recently widowed man and his 11 year old daughter, Rosalie, when her car breaks down, leaving her to walk the rest of the way through the woods. On the way, she meets an old woman who warns her of strange happenings since the girl’s mother died, and it just gets weirder from there.

Manages to strike a tone somewhere between Bava and the dreamy weirdness of ‘Tombs of the Blind Dead’ – if woods, fog, and synth are your thing, look no further.



PATRICK
dir. Richard Franklin, 1978
Australia, 112 min
In English.

TUESDAY, MARCH 3 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 21 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

A comatose hospital patient harasses and kills through his powers of telekinesis to claim his private nurse as his own.

Patrick follows the life of Patrick’s new nurse, who discovers he can communicate telepathically, as she moves through relationships in a script that’s aged surprisingly well. As his obsession grows, his possessiveness becomes more manic – not to mention his powers.

The classiest (and longest) entry in the series, Patrick was a crossover Ozploitation hit at the time of its release. Don’t let the length scare you – it’s a worthy Hitchockian slow-burn, plus telekinetic powers.

Directed by Richard Franklin (Road Games, Cloak & Dagger) and heavily referenced (read: ripped off) by Tarantino in a few Kill Bill sequences.

ANNA KARINA (1940-2019): A MEMORIAL – DEEP CUTS ONLY

On December 14th, 2019 the film community mourned the loss of the iconic actress, director, writer, and quintessential joie de vivre of the French New Wave, Anna Karina. While fellow movie-houses have been paying countless tributes to the Nouvelle Vague starlet with screenings of some of her most recognizable roles, at Spectacle we decided to memorialize one of our favorite silver-screen icons with the lesser known masterworks, which together along with the Godard films, forged a career that is singular in its breadth and intercontinental impact. Anna Karina who had become the symbol for cinematic revolution in 1960’s France had an instinctual command of style, beauty, and mystique that is present in all of her performances.

This series which selects films made from 1965-1974 is by no means absolute but serves to further illustrate Anna Karina’s worldwide reach and international stardom while highlighting some of her greatest works made outside the orbit of Jean-Luc Godard. Composed of four languages and produced with five countries, these films while uniquely different are unified by the dear Anna Karina, and it is to her charisma and ever-fascinating career that we dedicate this program of deep cuts and revivals.

Special thanks to: Greg Eggebeen, Cathérine Delvaux, Minerva Pictures, VITTO IT, Cinémathèque Royale de Belgique, and Universal Music.



LE SOLDATESSE
(aka The Camp Followers)
dir. Valerio Zurlini, 1965
Italian, 120 min.
In Italian and Greek with English subtitles

MONDAY, MARCH 9 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, MARCH 22 – 5 PM
MONDAY, MARCH 30 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

An intimate anti-war ensemble film about a group of prostitutes (led by Anna Karina & Marie Laforêt) who are being escorted through the treacherous mountains of Albania in order to service the Italian soldiers of World War II.

LE SOLDATESSE (aka, THE CAMP FOLLOWERS) is a Neo-Realist tour-de-force which demonstrates the futility of war and the magnitude of suffering through its black and white photography and its tragic inevitable conclusion. Filmed in a compositional mode evoking the lyricism of Antonioni, the film is also a delicate study on women camaraderie told through shared adversity and collective resistance.


ANNA
dir. Pierre Koralnik, 1967
France, 85 min.
In French with English subtitles.

SUNDAY, MARCH 1 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, MARCH 13 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, MARCH 17 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

A kaleidoscopic, energetic burst of bright colors, infectious musical numbers, and absurdly charming performances, ANNA, which played Spectacle in 2014, is a pop-art musical masterpiece that has been locked away for far too long.

Originally made as the first color film for French TV, Anna Karina stars as a shy artist who is unknowingly photographed one day and soon becomes the obsession of an advertising executive (played by French New Wave stalwart Jean-Claude Brialy).The Yé-Yé music, scored and soundtracked by French pop icon Serge Gainsbourg (who also makes several on-screen appearances), is some of the most infectious and catchy work of his career, with Karina’s vocals shining throughout,.Anna Karina also reunited with key Godard personnel, including editor Françoise Collin (BAND OF OUTSIDERS, PIERROT LE FOU, 2 OR 3 THINGS I KNOW ABOUT HER) and DP Wally Kurant (MASCULINE FEMININE).

Impossible to resist, the film feels like a pitch-perfect melding of Godard’s A WOMAN IS A WOMAN and Demy’s THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG, with Karina’s adorable beauty and effervescent charm as the center of attention. And be on the lookout for a Marianne Faithfull cameo.The film was a hit on French television in the late 60s and received a brief Japanese theatrical run in the 90s, but has since vanished and, to the best of our knowledge, has never screened before in the US. Working with Universal Music, Spectacle is enthralled to once again revive this lost gem of 60s French cinema.



LAUGHTER IN THE DARK
dir. Tony Richardson, 1969
United Kingdom & France, 104 mins
In English

THURSDAY, MARCH 5 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, MARCH 10 – 10 PM

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Adapted from Vladamir Nabokov’s novel of the same, LAUGHTER IN THE DARK deals with the obsession of a middle-aged man (Nicol Williamson) and his younger cunning mistress Margot (Anna Karina)– think Scarlet Street meets the British new wave. Tony Richardson trades Nabokov’s 1930’s Berlin for the Swinging 60’s of London in this lustful thriller of deceit which was never released on home video and has rarely-screened since it’s 1969 release. Anna Karina shines in her all-english role as the charming irresistible seductress who cultivates something mysterious behind her delicate wide-eyes.


LE TEMPS DE MOURIR
(aka THE TIME TO DIE)
dir. Andre Farwagi, 1970
France, 82 min.
In French with English subtitles

MONDAY, MARCH 2 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, MARCH 12 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, MARCH 24 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

A stylish, puzzling sci-fi mystery dealing with time travel and destiny, THE TIME TO DIE features loads of retro-cool technology futurisms and immaculate production design, but also manages to treat its subject matter with philosophical seriousness and respect. It supposes that the future is inevitable and the best we can do is hurl forwards towards our fated destiny.

RENDEZVOUS À BRAY
(aka APPOINTMENT IN BRAY)
dir. André Delvaux, 1971
France/Belgium/Weat Germany, 86 min.
In French with English Subtitles

SUNDAY, MARCH 1 – 5 PM
THURSDAY, MARCH 5 – 10 PM
MONDAY, MARCH 16 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

“As much as I revere some of the Belgian films of Chantal Akerman, if I had to choose only one Belgian film to take with me to a desert island, I’d have a pretty rough time forsaking this 1971 masterpiece by André Delvaux.” -Jonathan Rosenbaum

Paris 1917: a young pianist (Mathieu Carrière) receives a note from an old friend in the Air Force to join him at his lush country estate that happens to be close to the front lines of World War I. He arrives but his friend is nowhere to be found, with only the quiet, beautiful housekeeper (Anna Karina) present. While he spends days waiting for his friend’s arrival, his mind wanders to past events. At night, the mysterious woman appears again…

Based on a short story from surrealist Julien Gracq, Belgian auteur André Delvaux marries his trademark amalgam of fantasy and reality to Gracq’s shape-shifting text. Much like the film protagonist, Delvaux got his start by playing the piano to silent films in 1950s Brussels, and his musicality is on full display in the film’s sonata-like form, weaving variations of memories and moments into an ambiguous, intriguing mood piece. Cloaked in dense Gothic atmospheres and muted colors, RENDEZVOUS À BRAY gives off a melancholy, dream-like aura, subtle in approach but haunted by unspoken desires and half-imagined nostalgia.

Working with Delvaux’s daughter, we’re honored to re-introduce this classic of Belgium cinema.



L’INVENZIONE DI MOREL
(aka MOREL’S INVENTION)
dir. Emidio Greco, 1974
Italian, 110 mins.
In Italian with English Subtitles

MONDAY, MARCH 2 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, MARCH 19 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, MARCH 31 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Adapted from the novella which inspired the LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD, Emidio Greco’s MOREL’S INVENTION is a chilling slow-burning metaphysical oddity serving as a meditation on time, mortality, and the cinema itself. Starring Anna Karina as Faustine, a sort-of fellini-esque femme-enigma who is forever lost in the island’s haunting secrets of art-deco, socialite costume, and jazz.

OM-DAR-B-DAR


OM-DAR-B-DAR

dir. Kamal Swaroop, 1988.
India. 101 min.
In Hindi with English subtitles.

FRIDAY, MARCH 20 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, MARCH 24 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, MARCH 30 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Absurdist epic OM DAR-B-DAR is a pure outsider invention in Indian cinema, a shot at romance, religion, and commerce from the rocky hills of the northern province Rajasthan. The film showed at the Berlin film festival in 1988, but was instantly condemned to obscurity back at home where censors slapped it with an “adult” rating, assuring that it would never reach theaters. Were they befuddled by its barrage of nonsense, non-sequitur, and dream? Or did they find something overwhelmingly subversive in a film with such broad, if jumbled, satiric targets, complete dismissal of Indian filmmaking norms, and hero who, perhaps inspired by tadpoles refusing to metamorphose into frogs, inadvertently starts a religion and leads a mass revolt of suspended breath.

The film follows a family of iconoclasts. Father Babuji, after losing his job in a government office for issuing counterfeit Brahmin caste certificates to beggars, takes up astrology and calls his son Om to evade name-based astrological time-of-death predictions. Gayatri, the elder child is an independent unmarried 30-year-old who sits in the men’s section at the cinema and wonders if women will soon be climbing Everest without need of men. She eventually accepts the romantic overtures of layabout Jagadish because they request the same pop song on the radio and he attempts a love spell with a lock of her hair, but exercises her sexual agency in a hilariously Freudian anti-love scene. Om, for his part, runs away from home and leads the plot into a mass of convolutions involving a curse, a shoe filled with diamonds, and a few inadvertent miracles. Soon his ability to seemingly manifest wealth and hold his breath underwater, like the tadpoles of his biology classes, attracts religious followers, documentary filmmakers, and marketing personnel from PROMISE toothpaste.

It’s in the nature of this wild, often rigorously inexplicable film that sowing confusion takes on a renegade significance, and no two synopses written for it ever seem to describe the same story. Which you can take to mean that I’m able to provide only a smattering of its anarchic charms and mysteries in my own. For the rest, you’ll have to see it.

After 25 years in the wilderness, the film was at last restored and released to theaters in 2014. Director Kamal Swaroop, after a series of documentaries, has plans for a new feature. While this is all great news, in light of present events, it is worth noting that dissenting and minority voices are most important in their time, not buried for a quarter of a century to be safely lauded only much later.

CW: Contains some unnecessary frog violence.

BURNING FRAME: A Monthly Anarchist Film Series

CALLING ALL LEFTISTS! The past few years have been a whirlwind: exhausting, invigorating, and ripe with potential. It’s tremendously difficult, when in the thick of it, to pause, reflect, or even find a moment to catch a breath. Especially when “it” refers to the rise of fascism on a global scale, with any number of future cataclysms hovering just over the horizon. But we digress.

Join us, then, for a series that asks: if not now, when? Come for great works of radical political filmmaking, stay for the generative discussions, or even just to gossip and gripe. The hope isthat this forum for authentic representations of successes, defeats, and the messy work of political action, will be thrilling, edifying, and maybe even inspire your next organizing project. To butcher the title of a great film for the sake of a moderately applicable pun: “Throw away your dogma, rally in the cinema.”


SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16 – 7:30 PM
ONE NIGHT ONLY!

Soviet Smut
dir. Yakov Levi, 2009
82 mins. Russia.
In Russian with English subtitles.

The videos of Yakov Levi define amateur, yukking (and yakking) it up as a fuck you to the censors, an affirmation of solidarity with the beleaguered, demeaned and oppressed. If it blanches the middlebrow it’s here. Filth that fights back, then. Comedies, horror, horror comedies: Levi does it all! So in the spirit of lumpy-proletariat transgression we give you a corpus so rotted through it’s possible the swampy, grotty stench will befoul fair Spectacle for years to come. Slop, grit, grime, tosh, goo: all the muck that’s fit to ogle.

TRACKING ISSUES – COURTNEY FATHOM SELL RETURNS!

TRACKING ISSUES (w/ Selected Shorts)
dir. Courtney Fathom Sell, 207-2019
various lengths, USA

ONE NIGHT ONLY!
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29TH – 7:30 PM

A film school drop out after his first semester, Sell began traveling the country with nothing but a bag of clothes, a few dollars, a laptop and his beloved Hi8 camera. Covering 42 of the 50 states in a whirlwind Kerouac-esque style, Sell obsessively and extensively documented his travels and the people he met along the way before he even turned 22.

From sleeping in parks, graveyards and the many floors of his friends apartments, Sell would shoot and edit simultaneously on his broken laptop wherever he could and present the works wherever they would have him. Previously being distributed on DVD by small labels, these early short documentaries never gained much public attention but were recognized for their gritty style.

TRACKING ISSUES
61 min.
(NY Premiere!)

“I think Courtney Sell has provided us with something essential – a heartfelt testament of times gone by yet countered by a persuasive resonance that illuminates backyard filmmaking in all its earnest past glory.” — Mark Borchardt (“Coven” and “The Dundee Project”)

Filmed over the course of twenty two years and made entirely on disposable cameras, Sell’s feature length doc explores his early obsession with documenting every moment of his childhood, his filmmaking aspirations / i.e. shooting horror shorts in his parents backyard with friends every weekend after school and eventually capturing the cancerous struggle and untimely death of his father. A heartfelt, hilarious and touching entry in Sell’s vast collection of doc work that has never seen the light of day until now! Be kind, rewind.

“Sell is the real thing and “Tracking Issues” is destined to become an underground classic.” — Jennifer M. Kroot (“It Came From Kuchar” & “To Be Takei”)

THE HOLE
10 min.

“Treats the place with dignity, neither romanticizing its struggles nor pathologizing its residents.” – Newsweek

Located 30 feet below sea level, home to the Federation of Black Cowboys & known for being a mafia body dumping ground, welcome to the most mysterious neighborhood in New York City.

“A beautiful and fascinating exploration” – Filmmaker Magazine

MY DYING DAY
10 min.

“Here’s another documentarian to watch out for” – DVD Talk

After being given only two months to live, Bradley Sell went on to outlive his Doctor’s “Death Sentence Diagnosis” of cancer by almost eight years. During his last months, Sell asked his son to document his final moments with his Hi8 camera – scenes including shopping for his coffin, standing at his own gravestone and visiting others living in hospice care (who don’t have any idea their friend is in the same position as they are). One of Sell’s most revealing and personal shorts; riddled with moments of humor & inspiration.

“I’d hate to throw the word “devastating” out again in regard to another movie about cancer, and luckily, Sell seemingly won’t allow it anyway. – Of course this is rough stuff, depending on how you approach it, but it’s also refreshingly upbeat, and never maudlin. The fact that it’s Sell’s own father fighting a losing battle against cancer makes this 10 minutes truly remarkable.” – DVD Talk

IN THE GOLDEN BLOOD OF THE SUNLIGHT / BABY, YOU HAE NO IDEA (2018)
45 min.

NYC Premiere!

With his Hi8 camera in one hand and a cold drink in the other, Sell embarked on a year long tour with the New Orleans based band “The Singing Knives”, creating a rock-doc tapestry that finds the members deep in the gator-filled swamps of the bayou, playing a live show at full speed in the back of a el camino and producing their first album inside a local dive bar. A rockin’ portrait of friendship (a band void of ego or suffering from any vicious arguments commonly depicted in such rock-docs) and a love letter to New Orleans.

Baby You Have No Idea – Sell’s short follow up to In the Golden Blood of the Sunlight, now a year later out of the swamp, finds the boys of The Singing Knives now stuffed in a Northwest recording studio and embarking on a short tour down the coast.

Featuring a notable and touching sequence with poet Walt Curtis (Author of “Mala Noche”) who gave the short its title.

LIVING LIKE A KING
9 min.

Known as the “Lower East Side Minster of Information”, East Village resident John King gives us a tour of his universe; from his roach-infested apartment (once awarded “Grossest Apartment in NYC”) to Union Square where he recalls his experiences with Warhol and members of the Factory.

A fun-loving portrait of a carefree and hilarious individual.

DIE KINDER DER TOTEN


DIE KINDER DER TOTEN

dirs. Kelly Copper and Pavol Liska, 2019
90 mins. Austria/United States.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 – 7:30 PM + 10 PM  w/filmmaker Kelly Copper in person for Q&A!
(These screenings are $10.)
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19 – 7:30 PM w/filmmaker Kelly Copper in person for Q&A!
(This screening is $10.)

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

The Nature Theater of Oklahoma’s first foray into feature filmmaking is a silent movie-style zombie feature based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning Austrian horror novel by author Elfriede Jelinek (The Piano Teacher), using classic silent film tropes (and corpses) to critique the country’s not-so-distant Nazi past. Producer Ulrich Seidl (director of IMPORT/EXPORT and the PARADISE TRILOGY) and the New York-based experimental theatrical troupe reenvision Jelinek’s 666-page epic as a Super-8 backyard slasher from the Hinterlands, “imbued with a midnight movie spirit reminiscent of John Waters and Guy Maddin” (AFI).

ANTI-VALENTINE’S 2020

This February, Spectacle presents a wide array of dreamy, twisted, hilarious and psychedelic tales of love, lust, blood, guts and everything in between.


PSYCHOS IN LOVE
dir. Gorman Bechard, 1987
88 mins. United States.
In English.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22 – 7:30 PM w/filmmaker Gorman Bechard in person for Q&A!
(This event is $10.)
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27 – 10 PM

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A strip club owner and a manicurist bond over their hates and loves, quickly learning of their mutual love for bloodshed, which leads to an increasingly morbid race to one-up each others murderous accomplishments as their relationship gets more serious.
The rare horror comedy that succeeds on all fronts – managing to be funny, grotesque, and dare we say sweet, in the same beat


UNMASKED PT. 25
(aka HAND OF DEATH)
dir. Anders Palm, 1988
88 mins. United Kingdom.
In English.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9 – 5 PM
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14 – MIDNIGHT

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Jackson, a lonely and terribly disfigured serial killer in a hockey mask, begins to question the point of all the killing he’s been doing when he befriends a beautiful blind woman. Will he be able to stop his murderous ways and lead a normal life?  That rare horror-spoof that manages to be both funny and sincere while nonetheless delivering on the jump scares + gore, UNMASKED PART 25 is sorely in need of another look. We’re screening the film in a glistening new digital remaster courtesy of our friends at Vinegar Syndrome.


LAST HOUSE ON DEAD END STREET

dir. Roger Watkins, 1977.
77 mins. United States.
In English.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 – MIDNIGHT
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21 – MIDNIGHT

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Following a failed career as a pornographer and a stint in prison, unpleasant man Terry Hawkins (Roger Watkins) finally finds his calling as a director of snuff films. Exhausted with workaday pornography, a cortege of weary, nihilistic members of the leisure class finance his ventures. Terry shows his gratitude by making them the subjects of his next production. With most of the budget dedicated to the procurement of methamphetamines, director Roger Watkins nonetheless fashioned a singularly repellent work pitched somewhere between the grindhouse market and the Dada repertory. Beyond a genre curiosity, LAST HOUSE employs shock in the service of a dream-like exploration of dingy environs and irredeemable personalities.

[Content warning: Scenes in this film depict graphic torture, sexual assault, degraded yuppies indulging in racist iconography, and general unpleasantness.]


LABYRINTH OF DREAMS
(ユメノ銀河)
dir. Sogo Ishii, 1997
90 mins. Japan.

In Japanese with English subtitles.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7 – MIDNIGHT
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 29 – 10 PM

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Ishii’s Hitchcockian tale of romantic obsession and aggression begins in a surrealist mixture of dream, memory, and rumor.  When bus conductor, Tomiko (Rena Komine), gets assigned to work with bus driver Niitaka (Tadanobu Asano, of ICHII THE KILLER and BRIGHT FUTURE), not only does she think that he looks like the man from her dreams, but that he also might be the man who married and killed her friend and co-worker. Determined to get revenge, Tomiko seduces him. But when she finds herself irresistibly attracted to him she gets obsessed with testing the sincerity of his murderous desires. Shot in dreamy black and white, Ishii melds many of the guttural DIY techniques of his early punk years with moody expressionist compositions reminiscent of Maya Deren to create a film both aggressive and disorienting as well as melancholic and contemplative.

“A Freudian fable of the night, filled with moons, rain, dark tunnels and imminent collisions.”Tony Rayns, Senses of Cinema

OF HUMAN BONDAGE
Dir. John Cromwell, 1934
83 mins. United States.
In English.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1 – 10 PM
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12 – 10 PM
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26 – 10 PM

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Upper-crust scribe W. Somerset Maugham’s epic novel of class-crossed romance gets the pre-Code treatment from maestro of melodrama John Cromwell (ANNE VICKERS, SCANDAL STREET) in Of Human Bondage, arguably the classiest title in our nation’s Public Domain. Screen idol Leslie Howard stars as the club-footed narrator, whose sensitive disposition is no match for the sailor’s mouth and sloe-eyes of co-star Bette Davis. In a scathing and sympathetic turn, Davis plays against type (and her Boston Brahmin bona fides), delivering a smoldering performance that is sure to leave you begging for more. The ur-anti-Valentine picture, Cromwell’s adaptation is a pre-cursor to Pialat that delivers its uglier scenes with a side of soft Hollywood shimmer.