BURNING FRAME: A MONTHLY ANARCHIST FILM SERIES

CALLING ALL LEFTISTS! The past few years have been a whirlwind: exhausting, invigorating, and ripe with potential. It’s tremendously difficult, when in the thick of it, to pause, reflect, or even find a moment to catch a breath. Especially when “it” refers to the rise of fascism on a global scale, with any number of future cataclysms hovering just over the horizon. But we digress.

Join us, then, for a series that asks: if not now, when? Come for great works of radical political filmmaking, stay for the generative discussions, or even just to gossip and gripe. The hope is that this forum for authentic representations of successes, defeats, and the messy work of political action, will be thrilling, edifying, and maybe even inspire your next organizing project. To butcher the title of a great film for the sake of a moderately applicable pun: “Throw away your dogma, rally in the cinema.”

WHEN YOU PLAY ME LOUD VOL. 1: POP AGAINST COPS
dirs. Various, 1967-2020
80 mins.

SUNDAY, MARCH 22 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, MARCH 31 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

“Someone afraid of dancing is somehow afraid of many other things, you know?”Claire Denis

Your friendly neighborhood anarchists humbly offer a tour of the music video and its discontents. If you love to hop, wiggle and boogie then come on by for a showcase of sound colliding with image, iconographic subversions and praxis lived to the hilt. But still you ask, why this? We’ll give Emma the final word: “I did not believe that a Cause which stood for a beautiful ideal, for anarchism, for release and freedom from conventions and prejudice, should demand the denial of life and joy. I insisted that our Cause could not expect me to became a nun and that the movement should not be turned into a cloister. If it meant that, I did not want it. ‘I want freedom, the right to self-expression, everybody’s right to beautiful, radiant things.’ Anarchism meant that to me, and I would live it in spite of the whole world — prisons, persecution, everything.”

NEW CINEMA CLUB PRESENTS: IN FOCUS

SATURDAY, MARCH 28 = 7:30 PM w/ filmmaker for Q&A
ONE NIGHT ONLY!
(This screening is $10)

Like a kind of early career retrospective, In Focus presents an evening of work by a single filmmaker, an opportunity to explore the genesis and evolution of a new and unique voice in contemporary cinema. The filmmakers featured are always local and will be in attendance for a Q&A after the screening, led by New Cinema Club’s director of programming Tymon Brown.

The March edition of InFocus will focus on the work of Swetha Regunathan.

Swetha’s Bio
Swetha Regunathan is a writer and filmmaker based in NYC. Born in Pondicherry, India, she was brought to Montreal as a baby and grew up in Queens, New Jersey, and Mississippi. She holds a B.A. from Columbia University and a PhD in English Literature from Brown University. She has written for n+1, Guernica, and other publications. In 2009 she was nominated for a Pushcart Prize for Best American Essay. Swetha is currently an MFA candidate in the Graduate Film program at NYU Tisch School of the Arts. Swetha was the recipient of the Antonio Cirino Memorial Art Education Fellowship from the Rhode Island Foundation in 2015 and 2017. Her series THE ACADEMY was a finalist for the 2016 Sundance New Voices Lab, and her short HASIM OCTOBER was shortlisted for a 2017 Lexus Short Films award. The film also screened at the Indie Street Film Festival, Chicago South Asian Film Festival, New Cinema Club, and premiered on NoBudge in June 2019. Swetha produced IF THERE IS LIGHT, a short documentary about a family living in a shelter in NYC. The film was supported by Queen Latifah’s inaugural Queen Collective grant, in association with Tribeca Studios, and premiered at the 2019 Tribeca Film Festival. Her short script FOREVER TONIGHT won the 2019 BlueCat Screenplay Competition and was also a finalist for the  Showtime® Tony Cox Screenplay Competition. It is currently in post-production. Her next short, WIRE & CLOTH was awarded a 2019 Alfred P. Sloan production award and is currently in preproduction.

MILLENNIUM FILM WORKSHOP presents MEANS OF PRODUCTION: NEW ARTISTS’ CINEMA

SATORI
dir. Erica Schreiner, 2015.
USA. 93 min.
Silent w/ English subtitles.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25 – 7:30 PM w/ Q&A
ONE NIGHT ONLY!

ONLINE TICKETS            FACEBOOK EVENT 

Two years in the making, SATORI is a feature length art film created by New York-based video and performance artist Erica Schreiner. Shot on VHS, Schreiner performs before the camera while simultaneously operating it. She made the picture entirely by herself: writing, editing and acting.

Nightly, Satori gives birth to eggs and sells them in order to make enough money to survive so she can continue to make art. Satori becomes worn out and conflicted with the act of selling part of herself and discusses this and the many aspects of being an artist with her friends: an encouraging unicorn, the all-knowing goddess Isis and a very disagreeable Beta fish. Together they help Satori find a way into the Universe where she goes in search of meaning and answers about her existence as an artist.

SATORI was independently created and financed and is a visionary piece with an important message. Satori struggles to divide her time between cultivating her personal passion and working to make money for survival, within the system. Satori and the other magical characters contemplate the meaning of life, Satori’s experience, lack of privilege and opportunities, and the affect it has on her ability to create. She challenges the money system, at one point burning up all of her money because she was “starting to believe in the value of the stuff.” Satori ultimately finds her personal freedom outside the hierarchy of control, illustrated with anarchist themes and philosophical dialog.

SATORI is the first entry in MEANS OF PRODUCTION: NEW ARTISTS’ CINEMA presented by MILLENNIUM FILM WORKSHOP.

This series will be devoted to showcasing works from overlooked and unknown American and International contemporary artists working in film and video, and pushing bounds beyond the limitations implied in those forms. Whether presenting intimate-scale epic by heretical artists re-interpreting the world as they see it on a no-string budget, or artists expanding vision via new tools of expression in the present and future age, Means of Production is about looking forward to a 21st century where economic and technological barriers are broken down, ushering in a new era of highly original cinematic handiwork.

The Millennium Film Workshop was founded in 1967 by a group of filmmakers with a vision to expand accessibility to the tools, ideas, and networks of filmmaking beyond the confines of institutions and corporate studios. Millennium has put on countless educational workshops and artist-hosted screenings, printed our renowned publication The Millennium Film Journal and served as a production hub kickstarting the careers of filmmakers such as Stan Brakhage, Todd Haynes, Yvonne Rainer, Carolee Schneeman, Michael Snow, Bruce Connor, Nick Zedd, Andy Warhol and Bruce Connor. It has played a large role in dismantling the monetary and educational barriers separating the art and craft of filmmaking from the general public.

https://www.millenniumfilm.org
http://www.mfj-online.org/

MARCH IS A LONG HARD ROAD

If you thought February was hard to pronounce or hard to get through, just wait until you wait in line for this March double dong doozy. Big thanks to our friends who are keeping the rods greased up and on the road over at Bijou. Also, to our loud and proud friends – please respect our neighbors at Spectacle Theater who might not want to hear you cackling in the street all night. Or bring them!


THE GREASE MONKEYS
Dir. Mark Aaron, 1979
USA, 86 min.

SATURDAY, MARCH 14 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 20 – MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY, MARCH 27 – MIDNIGHT

ONLINE TICKETS      FACEBOOK EVENT

“I’m gonna catch that bastard, and when I do – I’m gonna fuck the shit out of him!”

Everybody grab your hot rods and get ready for full service on whatever vehicle you need servicing. Mark Aaron, wherever you are, thank you for creating this body shop of single entendres, tube socks, and long throbbing greasy fix-its. Featuring Nick Rodgers from HOT TRUCKIN’ fame, Kip Noll outta Greenwich CT, Lee Marlin of REAR DELIVERIES and many more. You won’t be able to get up from your seat until Queen finishes it off with I’m In Love With My Car and the credits roll.




HOT TRUCKIN’
Dir. Tom DeSimone, 1978
USA, 71 min.

SATURDAY, MARCH 14 – MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY, MARCH 20 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 28 – MIDNIGHT

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Logistics company got you down? Is it tough working on the road? Good thing you’ve got a buddy, a true friend who will let you stay the extra 20 (“let’s say 25”) minutes to get the job done. This March, grab a body, any body, and see what happens when you live the wild life of a moving guy!

MUBI PRESENTS: THE TOXIC AVENGER


THE TOXIC AVENGER
dir. Lloyd Kaufman and Michael Herz, 1984
United States, 82 min.
In English.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4 – 7:30 PM w/ Lloyd Kaufman in person!
(This screening is $10)
FRIDAY MARCH 6 – MIDNIGHT

ONLINE TICKETS          FACEBOOK EVENT 

MUBI is excited to present these exclusive screenings to launch their new series dedicated to the infamous American independent production company Troma. Directed by the company’s founders, THE TOXIC AVENGER is an endlessly inspired oddity of a superhero movie—made long before the genre became rife with convention and impersonality.

THE TOXIC AVENGER is the first film in MUBI‘s series The Vulgar Disruptor: Troma Restored

Founded in 1974 by filmmakers Lloyd Kaufman and Michael Herz, the production-distribution company Troma has long been dedicated to realizing and releasing only the most transgressive of genre films. Troma is indisputably a landmark company in the American filmmaking landscape, upending all comfortable notions of both good and bad taste and high and low art.

MUBI celebrates their commitment to all things vulgar with this 6-film series which encompasses films across the company’s lifetime, starting with their initial runaway success of The Toxic Avenger through to what is surely the most gruesome adaptation of Romeo and Juliet ever realized, the aptly titled Tromeo & Juliet. From gross-out Shakespeare adaptations to a Nazi-hunting exploitation revenge flick, there’s something here for everyone.

THE TOXIC AVENGER will be available to stream on MUBI starting March 3. More info here.

MUBI is a curated streaming service. An ever-changing collection of hand-picked films. From new directors to award-winners. From everywhere on earth. Beautiful, interesting, incredible movies — a new one, every single day. Always thoughtfully selected. MUBI is available to watch in 190 countries. On any screen or device, anywhere.

FREE AT LAST: The Marriage Circle

New works are finally entering the public domain after a 20 year hiatus; come and celebrate the newly liberated films of 1924 with Spectacle!

THE MARRIAGE CIRCLE
dir. Ernst Lubitsch, 1924.
France. 85 min.
Silent with English intertitles

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 28 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS           FACEBOOK EVENT 

In this marital sex comedy, Lubitsch finds humor in the small conflicts and misunderstandings that arise in relationships. Lubitsch thought of The Marriage Circle as depicting “everyday people” who were “just a little bit bad and not too good.”

In Vienna, two married couples intersect; the newly-married and in-love Brauns and the mismatched Stocks. The flapperish Mizzi Stock, unsatisfied with her husband’s subdued and formal manner and lack of attention, throws herself at the first man she runs into, who happens to be the new husband of her best friend Charlotte Braun. As Mizzi pursues Doctor Braun, who does his best to evade her, Charlotte begins to suspect that he’s interested in another woman. Doctor Braun’s partner sees his chance and takes the opportunity to woo the unreceptive Charlotte. Hoping to procure a divorce from his restless wife, Professor Stock hires a detective who uncovers Mizzi’s connection to Doctor Braun, threatening his otherwise happy marriage.

JANE: AN ABORTION SERVICE


JANE: AN ABORTION SERVICE

dir. Kate Kirtz and Nell Lundy, 1996
United States, 58 min.
In English.

FRIDAY, MARCH 27 – 7:30 PM
ONE NIGHT ONLY!
(This event is $10)

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

100% of ticket sales will go to Access Reproductive Care – Southeast, an Atlanta-based service providing financial and logistical support for those in need of abortions in six southeastern states.

This fascinating political look at a little-known chapter in women’s history tells the story of “Jane”, the Chicago-based women’s health group who performed nearly 12,000 safe illegal abortions between 1969 and 1973 with no formal medical training.

Special thanks to Women Make Movies.

DO YOU KNOW WHERE YOUR GIRLS ARE?

Burning rubber? Taking names? Climbing the social ladders of the Brooklyn organized crime scene? These women (gasp) do it all. Alternating between the schlock and the subversive, the films included in this series are best enjoyed with your own clique of delinquents, punks and biker toughs.

Special thanks to byNWR, G.B. Jones, Vtape, and AGFA.



CHAINED GIRLS
dir. Joseph P. Marwa, 1965
United States, 65 min.
In English.

SATURDAY, MARCH 7 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, MARCH 15 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Presented by byNWR

In contemporary times, sleaze documentarian Marwa’s expose of the secret lives of New York lesbians plays best wryly and tongue-and-cheek (and occasionally laugh out loud). This anthropological oddity is shot verité-style on the Greenwich Village streets, drastically underexposed, an amateurish eventide tour of mid-60s New York with the mysterious Sapphics as our guide. byNWR’s recent incredible restoration preserves an unforgettable pre-Stonewall curio.

screening with

THE YO-YO GANG
dir. G.B. Jones, 1992
Canada, 30 min.
In English.

Flash forward thirty years, to queercore Toronto, where Fifth Column’s G.B. Jones unleashed the furiously gritty punk opus Yo-Yo Gang, following a turf war between the titular girl clique and their nemeses, The Skateboard Bitches.



TEENAGE GANG DEBS
dir. Sande N. Johnson, 1966
United States, 72 min.
In English.

FRIDAY, MARCH 6 – 10 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

“No one’s gonna cut me up, pigface!” growls no-goodnik Terry (Diane Conti), fresh in Brooklyn from Manhattan and vying to wrest control of the Brooklyn-based Rebels. An operatic teen movie full of brawls on the open Brooklyn streets, Teenage Gang Debs has a rightful rep as one of the most fun films in its genre.



GIRL GANG
dir. Robert C. Derteno, 1954
United States, 64 min.
In  English.

MONDAY, MARCH 16 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, MARCH 23 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

A prime cut of 1950s cautionary schlock, Girl Gang chronicles the downfall of a group of teens who fall under the drug-addled sway of gangster kingpin. Funded by roadshow maestro George Weiss, who also funded Ed Wood’s films as well as Chained Girls, this z-grade relic was rescued from obscurity by Something Weird.



SHE-DEVILS ON WHEELS
dir. Herschell Gordon Lewis, 1968
United States, 88 min.
In English.

FRIDAY, MARCH 6 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, MARCH 15 – 5 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18 -10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Presented by the America Genre Film Archive.

Gore god Gordon Lewis gives girl gangs a go in this mean and nasty 1968 exploitation flick following the exploits of The Man-Eaters; biker chicks reigning over a Florida town. They race their bikes weekly on an airport tarmac, endowing the winner with “first pick from the stud line”. Shot in Miami (and reportedly starring actual motorcycle toughs), She-Devils is as colorful as exploitation films get.

WOMEN’S PUNK ART MAKING PARTIES

The word “collective” brings to mind infinite potentials — an unlimited number of practices towards horizontality within an artistic ecosystem. Some of these practices are more tenable than others, but throughout history activist-minded artists have collectivized in an effort to change what the economic, social and political model of making arts looks like. From West Berlin to DC, the Second Wave to riot grrrl, we present a cross-section of female artists coming together in times of political need.

Organized with Mary Billyou. Special thanks to Kristen Fitzpatrick, WMM, Filmmaker’s Co-op, K8 Hardy, Wynne Greenwood, Facets, and Meredith Drum.



WOMEN’S PUNK ART MAKING PARTY
Dir. Mary Billyou, 1996.
United States, 33 min.
In English.

SATURDAY, MARCH 21 – 7:30 PM w/director Mary Billyou in person
THURSDAY, MARCH 26 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, MARCH 29 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

A documentary in which a group of young women meet for an art-making party. Located at The Beehive Collective in Washington, DC, six individual episodes are loosely interspersed, allowing each participant a chance to represent themselves. Included: a feminist stripper preparing for work, a puppet show, and a music video.

screening with

SHE HAD HER GUN ALL READY
dir. Vivienne Dick, 1978.
United States, 28 min.
In English.

Vivienne Dick takes aim a reverence and power dynamics among women in one of her best known shorts, an 8mm Lower East Side-set psychodrama starring Lydia Lunch.

and

NEW REPORT ARTIST UNKNOWN
dir. K8 Hardy, Wynne Greenwood, 2006
United States, 16 min.
In English.

A collaborative project envisioning a news service in a post-feminist world, this comedic short features K8 Hardy (founder of the queer feminist art collective LTTR) and Wynne Greenwood (of Tracy and the Plastics) playing Henry Irigaray and Henry Stein-Acker-Hill, an anchor and roving correspondent for WKRH, a feminist TV news station whose tagline is “pregnant with information.”



THE ALL-AROUND REDUCED PERSONALITY
(aka DIE ALLSEITIG REDUZIERTE PERSÖNLICHKEIT)
dir. Helke Sander, 1979
Germany, 98 min.
In German with English subtitles.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 7 – 10 PM 
THURSDAY, MARCH 19 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

“Emancipation or not, you want to sell a story.”

Threatened by the increasing cost of living (not to mention of producing images), a women’s photography collective attempts to subvert a commission given to them by the politically and sexually repressive West German government. Drifting from private moments to Godardian accounting, urban survey to bureaucratic detentes, Sanders probes the possibility of reintegrating art into social space as a means of ending grey-on-grey capitalism and socialism, two sides of the same valueless coin.



UNDER THE PAVEMENT LIES THE STRAND
(aka UNTER DEM PFLASTER IST DER STRAND)
dir. Helma Sanders-Brahms, 1975
Germany, 99 min.
In German with English subtitles.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12 – 10 PM
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, MARCH 27 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

A sociological document on the working woman and abortion, an anti-matrimonial and anti-utopian communist manifesto, Unter dem Pflaster is an intimate chronicle of post-68 malaise and the growing schism between sexual and political revolutions. An illicit and ludic affair between two actors with a shared past in the student rebellions opens up onto the history of German revolution and fascism, the constraints of domestic monogamy and claustrophobia of private property, as they watch themselves become the very parents they mutinied against. Caught at a crux of early postmodernity, Sanders-Brahms pinpoints the exigency of a women’s movement in the stale husk of ’68 macho militancy and growing recuperation in post-Fordist women’s reformism.



THE HERETICS
dir. Joan Braderman, 2009
United States, 95 min.
In English.

TUESDAY, MARCH 3 -7:30 PM
SUNDAY, MARCH 29 – 5 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Presented by Women Make Movies

Tracing the influence of the Women’s Movement’s Second Wave on art and life, THE HERETICS is the exhilarating inside story of the New York feminist art collective that produced “Heresies: A Feminist Publication on Art and Politics” (1977-92). On the road with her camera crew from New Mexico to Italy, Braderman reconnects with 28 other group members, including writer/critic Lucy Lippard, architect Susanna Torre, filmmaker Su Friedrich, and artists Ida Applebroog, Mary Miss, Miriam Schapiro, and Cecilia Vicuña. — WMM

“Upbeat and affirmative…The stories these women tell envision a radically different moment in art-world history, one in which questions of career and market are barely mentioned, and philosophical arguments are firmly grounded in street-level politics.” — Ed Halter, ARTFORUM



WOMANHOUSE
dir. Johanna Demetrakas, 1974
United States, 47 min.
In English.

MONDAY, MARCH 9 – 10 PM 
MONDAY, MARCH 23 – 7:30 PM 
THURSDAY, MARCH 26 – 10 PM 

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Presented by Women Make Movies

WOMANHOUSE is an historic documentary about one of the most important feminist cultural events of the 1970s. Judy Chicago (best-known as the creator of THE DINNER PARTY) and Miriam Shapiro rented an old Hollywood mansion and altered its interior through decor and set-pieces to “search out and reveal the female experience…the dreams and fantasies of women as they sewed, cooked, washed and ironed away their lives.”

screening with

TAKING RESIDENCE: A HISTORY OF AIR GALLERY
dir. Meredith Drum, 2012
United States, 16 min.
In English.

A short documentary about the first non-profit, all-women’s gallery in the U.S., AIR Gallery, founded in 1972 in downtown New York City. This documentary was made on the occasion of a history show about AIR at Fales Library and the Tracey / Barry Gallery at New York University.

CONTROL FREAKS

A trio of horror films about controlling, overbearing, downright awful children.



THE PIT
dir. Lew Lehman, 1981
Canada, 96 min
In English.

FRIDAY, MARCH 13 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 21 – MIDNIGHT

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

Left with a baby sitter, a bad boy with a teddy bear finds a pit with four hungry monsters.

The most cartoonish of the trilogy is also somehow, occasionally, the most unsettling. Jamie, as played by Sammy Snyders in his second-to-last credit (right behind ‘The Littlest Hobo’), is an obnoxious, cringey, and entirely too horny pre-teen with parents who coddle him and his ‘unique’ behavior as he burns through babysitters who can’t handle him. Oh, did we mention he also has a teddy bear who talks to him, and has also found a pit full of ‘friends’ in the woods?

Tonal shifts abound as Jamie’s increasing(ly uncomfortable) attraction to his new babysitter Sandy curdles into rage at her and everyone who’s ever bullied him. The less you know the better, but The Pit is certainly a ride worth taking.



THE CHILD
dir. Robert Voskanian, 1977
US, 82 min
In English.

SATURDAY, MARCH 7 – MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY, MARCH 13 – MIDNIGHT
MONDAY, MARCH 30 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

A 1930’s widower hires a governess for his daughter, who can summon zombies.

Almost the polar opposite of The Pit despite very similar synopses, The Child is a distinctly moodier and more serious affair. Alicianne is en route to her new job as the governess to a recently widowed man and his 11 year old daughter, Rosalie, when her car breaks down, leaving her to walk the rest of the way through the woods. On the way, she meets an old woman who warns her of strange happenings since the girl’s mother died, and it just gets weirder from there.

Manages to strike a tone somewhere between Bava and the dreamy weirdness of ‘Tombs of the Blind Dead’ – if woods, fog, and synth are your thing, look no further.



PATRICK
dir. Richard Franklin, 1978
Australia, 112 min
In English.

TUESDAY, MARCH 3 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, MARCH 21 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS        FACEBOOK EVENT

A comatose hospital patient harasses and kills through his powers of telekinesis to claim his private nurse as his own.

Patrick follows the life of Patrick’s new nurse, who discovers he can communicate telepathically, as she moves through relationships in a script that’s aged surprisingly well. As his obsession grows, his possessiveness becomes more manic – not to mention his powers.

The classiest (and longest) entry in the series, Patrick was a crossover Ozploitation hit at the time of its release. Don’t let the length scare you – it’s a worthy Hitchockian slow-burn, plus telekinetic powers.

Directed by Richard Franklin (Road Games, Cloak & Dagger) and heavily referenced (read: ripped off) by Tarantino in a few Kill Bill sequences.