Category: Ongoing Series

SPECTOBER MIDNIGHTS

FRIDAY, SPECTOBER 2: 555
SATURDAY, SPECTOBER 3: WILD SIDE

FRIDAY, SPECTOBER 9: THE UNDERTAKER AND HIS PALS
SATURDAY, SPECTOBER 10: BALLET DOWN THE HIGHWAY

FRIDAY, SPECTOBER 16: HEADLESS EYES
SATURDAY, SPECTOBER 17: THE NIGHT BEFORE

FRIDAY, SPECTOBER 23: MARLEY’S REVENGE: THE MONSTER MOVIE
SATURDAY, SPECTOBER 24: FIFTH ANNUAL SPECTACLE SHRIEK SHOW

FRIDAY, SPECTOBER 30: TROUBLE EVERY DAY
SATURDAY, SPECTOBER 31: COMING SOON


555_banner

Massacre Video presents: 555
Dir. Wally Koz, 1988.
90 min, USA.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 – MIDNIGHT

From The First Annual Spectacle Shriek Show. (2011)

A hippie killer with a sex-fueled, murderous bloodlust is on a rampage and he’s brutally murdering innocent young couples! A nationwide trend of killings with the same m.o. happens to catch the eyes of Detective Haller and Sergeant Connor. Every five years, within five days of each other, the killer strikes! Now it’s up to Haller and Connor to find out who is behind these grisly murders. Who is this crazed, blood thirsty hippie? And more importantly, what is the significance of the third ‘five’?

Written by Roy Koz and directed by Wally Koz, this rare SOV splatter-classic has recently been given the royal treatment by Massacre Video with a DVD, special edition DVD, and an already eBay fodder clamshell.


WildSideBanner (1)

WILD SIDE
Dir. Donald Cammell, 1995.
U.S., 110 min. (Director’s cut); 95 min. (Nu Image re-edit)

Nu Image Re-edit
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3 – MIDNIGHT

Director’s Cut
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3 – 10:00 PM
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, OCTOBER 26 – 7:30 PM

Donald Cammell’s fourth film in as many decades, the brilliant and berserk WILD SIDE is a beyond-salacious slab of psycho-noir starring Anne Heche as “Alex”, a Long Beach investment banker-cum sex worker for the rich and powerful. Tonight, that means Bruno – a shadowy millionaire money launderer (Christopher Walken, plus wig) – and perhaps also his valet, a sleazy undercover cop by the name of Tony (Steven Hauer, of Scarface fame). Cammell’s signature refracted narrative comes into play when Alex meets Bruno’s wife Virginia (Joan Chen), up-turning audience expectations for late-nite sleaze into a surprisingly tender, psychologically astute, and crushingly desperate queer love story. (There’s also a sublime Ryuichi Sakamoto score, and a concurrent subplot about a virus on a floppy disk that, if it fell into the wrong hands, would bring the western world to its knees.)

After Nu Image Productions wrested control of WILD SIDE away from Cammell and recut the film into the schizoid quasi-porn they thought they had paid for, the filmmaker saw fit to take his own life. In 2000, Kong supervised a painstaking, posthumous recut with editor Frank Mazzola; this October, Spectacle is thrilled to present both the damned and saved versions of WILD SIDE.

“Games are again played with power and identity, dangerous games but not fatal ones this time; if there is one difference between the Cammell of 1968 and of 1995 that stands out above all others, it is the replacement of Artaudian cruelty with an affectionate generosity towards his characters.” – Maximilian Le Cain, Senses of Cinema

“When this film was premiered at last year’s Edinburgh Festival, it was accompanied by a remarkable on-stage talk from Mazzola and Kong, who were able to show extracts from the butchered, and utterly different ‘TV version’: furnishing us with an unmissable masterclass in the realities of film editing and a radical essay in the textual aspects of cinema. I hope that Mr Mazzola and Ms Kong can be persuaded to repeat this lecture all over the country.” – Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian


UNDERTAKER_BANNER

Lunchmeat VHS Fanzine presents: THE UNDERTAKER AND HIS PALS
Dir. T.L.P. Swicegood, 1966.
63 min, USA.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9 – MIDNIGHT

From The Spectacle Shriek Show II. (2012)

Two degenerate café owners cook up a depraved alliance with a demented Undertaker and run amok through town on their motorcycles, hacking up hot dames and cleaving craniums. Select portions of the corpses are served up as daily specials at the café and The Undertaker gets to bury the leftovers. But when a pair of local detectives smell something fishy afoot, the trio’s reign of terror runs into some trouble.

One of Lunchmeat Publisher and Editor-in-Chief Josh Schafer’s all-time favorite flicks, this pioneering pitch black comedy is a kitschy slice of pure drive-in delirium that plants its tongue firmly in cheek, then bites it off and spits it out onto a sizzling hot plate ready for you to enjoy. Once you’ve ingested the wacky slab o’ cinema cheeze that is THE UNDERTAKER AND HIS PALS, you’ll never get the taste out of your mouth!

Dig it!


BALLET DOWN THE HIGHWAY
Dir. Jack Deveau
USA, 93 min, 1975

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10 – MIDNIGHT
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14 – 10:00 PM
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20 – 7:30 PM

Opposites attract when a New York ballet dancer’s car breaks down on the highway and he is rescued by a closeted truck driver. An ambivalent romance blossoms until he finds the city apartment he shares with his boyfriend, a fellow dancer, filled with horny truckers. Filled with sadness and unrequited longing, BALLET DOWN THE HIGHWAY is directed by Jack Deveau, whose disco-tastic DRIVE screened at Spectacle in 2014.


HEADLESSEYES_Banner

Spectacle Midnights presents: HEADLESS EYES
Dir. Kent Bateman, 1971.
78 min, USA.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 – MIDNIGHT

From The Third Annual Spectacle Shriek Show. (2013)

You know how it is for starving artists, right? I mean, look at your clothes. Anyway, it used to be even harder! So hard that some of them turned to a life of crime. This is especially true in the case of Arthur Malcolm. Down on his luck, Arthur is caught robbing an apartment and loses his eye in the process. Once he’s healed he’s out on the streets and, brother, he is HEATED. Arthur sets about on a mad killing spree, gouging out the eyes of his victims with a spoon. He collects the eyes for his artwork, you see. This continues for some time with mixed results.

This film was directed by Kent Bateman, father of Jason and Justine, in the streets of a now long gone version of NYC. According to this film, it was a time when a hooker would approach a man covered in blood in the middle of the day in order to turn a trick. The good old days. In addition to this movie being totally batshit insane with a FIERCE mutant soundtrack, it’s a veritable snapshot of a city as nasty as they come. The performances are hammy and intense, like Easter dinner in a mental institution.

Not to be missed!


THE NIGHT BEFORE
Dir. Arch Brown
USA, 72 min, 1973

MONDAY, OCTOBER 12 – 7:30 PM
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 17 – MIDNIGHT
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20 – 10:00 PM

THE NIGHT BEFORE gets its straightforward gay porn “narrative” out of the way in the first half before getting on with being exceptionally odd and psychedelic. There’s body painting, someone sucking a disembodied cock that appears out of a bowl of fruit, a woman dancing in Central Park for no reason, and if you want to see an orgy scene
where a dildo goes in so deep it comes out someone’s mouth, this film is highly recommended. Also appearing: kittens.


MARLEY_Banner

Horror Boobs presents: MARLEY’S REVENGE: THE MONSTER MOVIE
Dir. Jet Eller, 1989.
83 min, USA.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23 – MIDNIGHT

From The Fourth Annual Spectacle Shriek Show. (2014)

“I don’t know about you, man, but I’m still huuuuungry.”

Two bozos get picked up by a gang of vigilantes out to scrub the streets of scum after mistaking the men for drug smugglers. The problem is they’re actually smuggling in their aunt and uncle. The four are whisked away to the local island where they murder all the other drug smugglers. You know what though? None of this even matters because once they get to the island things get really out of hand. Zombies rise from the grave, a giant hell monster shows up, and the vigilantes aren’t too pleased either. How will anyone escape this island alive?

Another marathon mainstay and VHS monolith, Horror Boobs has been providing not only marathon fare but midnight fodder at Spectacle for over a decade![citation needed] This years entry is…well, something special indeed.

Featuring a completely new transfer and other goodies. If you saw this at the marathon last year, you still haven’t truly seen it. A house favorite and rare treat!


TroubleErryday2

TROUBLE EVERY DAY
Dir. Claire Denis, 2001
France, 101 mins.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 – 10:00 PM
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 13 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30 – MIDNIGHT

An American doctor (Vincent Gallo) arrives in Paris with his new wife (Tricia Vessey). They are ostensibly on honeymoon, but he is strangely distant and preoccupied with finding a former a colleague. Meanwhile, a French couple live in seclusion, the husband (Alex Descas) both caring for and imprisoning his wife (Béatrice Dalle, exuding a primal power) whose mysterious illness has reduced her to a vehicle for her own bloodlust. Connections between these characters reveal themselves slowly; exposition here is a distant second to a deep sensuality in the truest sense of the word. Denis’ tactile approach to filmmaking is in full effect, the camera mapping out fragile bodies with careful, almost predatory attention, creating a discomfiting sense of intimacy. TROUBLE EVERY DAY is a film felt as much as viewed, and when it reaches its bloody apex, that’s a truly frightening thing.

GHOSTS OF SHRIEK SHOWS PAST

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 – MIDNIGHT: 555
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9 – MIDNIGHT: THE UNDERTAKER AND HIS PALS
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 – MIDNIGHT: HEADLESS EYES
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23 – MIDNIGHT: MARLEY’S REVENGE: THE MONSTER MOVIE

Since the dawn of time, Spectacle has long been carried on the backs of many a supporter. It’s kind of like that poem Footprints that hung in your grandma’s dorm room. Or better yet, it’s like an ant farm. A cool ass ant farm that shows the best movies you’ve ever seen. To be blunt–Spectacle wouldn’t and couldn’t exist without the often jaw-dropping amount of love we receive from filmmakers, distributors, cinephiles, and (of course) our audience.

In 2011, we held our first ever horror marathon (and last ever sci-fi marathon). Over the course of the next 4 years the marathon would play host to some incredible titles both old and new while laying waste to brains both old and new. Whether you stopped by for the full 12 (sometimes 14) hours or just came for one movie (or maybe you’re the those two dudes who showed up at 2am after the first one who thought it started at midnight instead of noon)–we say thank you.

To celebrate half a decade of marathons we present GHOSTS OF SHRIEK SHOWS PAST. The following titles are hand picked one from each past year to lead into The Fifth Annual Spectacle Shriek Show this year on October 24th. Without the generosity, kindness, and confidence of the following presenters (and others too numerous to cover in this brief post) we wouldn’t be where we are today.

South Third Street Forever.


555_banner

Massacre Video presents: 555
Dir. Wally Koz, 1988.
90 min, USA.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 – MIDNIGHT

From The First Annual Spectacle Shriek Show. (2011)

A hippie killer with a sex-fueled, murderous bloodlust is on a rampage and he’s brutally murdering innocent young couples! A nationwide trend of killings with the same m.o. happens to catch the eyes of Detective Haller and Sergeant Connor. Every five years, within five days of each other, the killer strikes! Now it’s up to Haller and Connor to find out who is behind these grisly murders. Who is this crazed, blood thirsty hippie? And more importantly, what is the significance of the third ‘five’?

Written by Roy Koz and directed by Wally Koz, this rare SOV splatter-classic has recently been given the royal treatment by Massacre Video with a DVD, special edition DVD, and an already eBay fodder clamshell.


UNDERTAKER_BANNER

Lunchmeat VHS Fanzine presents: THE UNDERTAKER AND HIS PALS
Dir. T.L.P. Swicegood, 1966.
63 min, USA.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9 – MIDNIGHT

From The Spectacle Shriek Show II. (2012)

Two degenerate café owners cook up a depraved alliance with a demented Undertaker and run amok through town on their motorcycles, hacking up hot dames and cleaving craniums. Select portions of the corpses are served up as daily specials at the café and The Undertaker gets to bury the leftovers. But when a pair of local detectives smell something fishy afoot, the trio’s reign of terror runs into some trouble.

One of Lunchmeat Publisher and Editor-in-Chief Josh Schafer’s all-time favorite flicks, this pioneering pitch black comedy is a kitschy slice of pure drive-in delirium that plants its tongue firmly in cheek, then bites it off and spits it out onto a sizzling hot plate ready for you to enjoy. Once you’ve ingested the wacky slab o’ cinema cheeze that is THE UNDERTAKER AND HIS PALS, you’ll never get the taste out of your mouth!

Dig it!


HEADLESSEYES_Banner

Spectacle Midnights presents: HEADLESS EYES
Dir. Kent Bateman, 1971.
78 min, USA.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16 – MIDNIGHT

From The Third Annual Spectacle Shriek Show. (2013)

You know how it is for starving artists, right? I mean, look at your clothes. Anyway, it used to be even harder! So hard that some of them turned to a life of crime. This is especially true in the case of Arthur Malcolm. Down on his luck, Arthur is caught robbing an apartment and loses his eye in the process. Once he’s healed he’s out on the streets and, brother, he is HEATED. Arthur sets about on a mad killing spree, gouging out the eyes of his victims with a spoon. He collects the eyes for his artwork, you see. This continues for some time with mixed results.

This film was directed by Kent Bateman, father of Jason and Justine, in the streets of a now long gone version of NYC. According to this film, it was a time when a hooker would approach a man covered in blood in the middle of the day in order to turn a trick. The good old days. In addition to this movie being totally batshit insane with a FIERCE mutant soundtrack, it’s a veritable snapshot of a city as nasty as they come. The performances are hammy and intense, like Easter dinner in a mental institution.

Not to be missed!


MARLEY_Banner

Horror Boobs presents: MARLEY’S REVENGE: THE MONSTER MOVIE
Dir. Jet Eller, 1989.
83 min, USA.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23 – MIDNIGHT

From The Fourth Annual Spectacle Shriek Show. (2014)

“I don’t know about you, man, but I’m still huuuuungry.”

Two bozos get picked up by a gang of vigilantes out to scrub the streets of scum after mistaking the men for drug smugglers. The problem is they’re actually smuggling in their aunt and uncle. The four are whisked away to the local island where they murder all the other drug smugglers. You know what though? None of this even matters because once they get to the island things get really out of hand. Zombies rise from the grave, a giant hell monster shows up, and the vigilantes aren’t too pleased either. How will anyone escape this island alive?

Another marathon mainstay and VHS monolith, Horror Boobs has been providing not only marathon fare but midnight fodder at Spectacle for over a decade![citation needed] This years entry is…well, something special indeed.

Featuring a completely new transfer and other goodies. If you saw this at the marathon last year, you still haven’t truly seen it. A house favorite and rare treat!

MILLENNIUM FILM WORKSHOP AT SPECTACLE

millenium

Spectacle is pleased to host Millennium Film Workshop for an ongoing, weekly presentation through December 2015 to showcase a selection of works by cinema artists.

For 49 years, Millennium Film Workshop has supported the emergence of a veritable “who’s who” of experimental and non-commercial film cinema artists, through low cost workshops and equipment access, critical discourse in Open Screenings and the pages of the Millennium Film Journal, and through Personal Cinema Screenings that provide a forum for filmmakers to present and discuss their work in self-curated programs. Continuing a policy of “open” programming, we invite cinema artists and scholars to propose screenings, series, or events. We invite you to contact us at screenings@millenniumfilm.org.

NOW PLAYING:
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4: 7:30 PM – DIVIDING ROADMAPS BY TIMEZONES: FILMS BY AMANDA DAWN CHRISTIE
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13: 7:30 PM – MILLENNIUM FILM WORKSHOP MEMBER’S SHOW


9-9_banner

POLYNESIAN TRIANGLE PROGRAM
Dir. Various, 1958-2015
Various, Total Running Time: 75 min.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 – 7:30 PM
** Grahame Weinbren in attendance! **

The program is curated by Grahame Weinbren from an assemblage of films selected by Martin Rumsby. It consists of works primarily by Samoan, New Zealand and Cook Island Maori, moving image artists from the Polynesian Triangle, which extends from New Zealand to Hawaii, from Easter Island to Samoa. All the works are U.S. premieres, and many world premieres made especially for the program. Artists include Leilani Kake, Tanya Ruka, Jeremy Leatinu’u, and Len Lye. The program is based on Martin Rumsby’s “The Ocean is our Prairie,” published in MFJ 61. Graham Weinbren will read from this text.

FREE RADICALS
Dir. Len Lye, 1958-1979
New Zealand, 4 min.

POUTAMA
Dir. Tanya Ruka, 2015
New Zealand, 4 min.

IN PURSUIT OF VENUS (INFECTED), 2 excerpts
Dir. Lisa Reihana, 2015
New Zealand, 3 min.

KIA ORA / KIA ORANA
Dir. Leilani Kake, 2010
Cook Island/New Zealand, 8 min.

THE WELCOME PROJECT
Dir. Jeremy Leatinu’u, 2010
New Zealand, 21 min.

TANE LIVES
Dir. Johnson Witehira, 2011
New Zealand, 3 min

TIMES SQUARE PROJECT [DOCUMENTATION]
Dir. Johnson Witehira, 2012
New Zealand, 2 min.


9-17_Banner

VAGUE TERRAIN
Dir. Various, 2010-2015
USA/Belgium, Total Running Time: 56 min.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 – 7:30 PM
** All artists in attendance! **

Curated by Angela Ferraiolo.

A diverse group of filmmakers comes together to examine the familiar and ambiguous–to revisit places, persons, situations or ideas in an effort to find that small part of an experience that escapes logic, system, and the quantifiable. By looking at what is weird, and unstable, these films seek to generate illusory narratives, unsettling landscapes, and strange interiors.

LOS ANGELES II
Dir. Angela Ferraiolo, 2013
USA, 2 min.

GLASS ELEVATOR
Dir. Angela Ferraiolo, 2015
USA, 12 min. 30 sec.

PARADISE
Dir. Noe Kidder, 2010
USA, 10 min.

PARADISE OF CHILDREN
Dir. Noe Kidder, 2015
USA, 3 min.

ALEXIA
Dir. Kevin Jarvis, 2015
USA, 8 min.

INTELLECTUAL DESIGN
Dir. Kevin Jarvis, 2015
USA, 15 min.

DUBAI/ABU DHABI DESERT
Dir. Robbert&Frank Frank&Robbert, 2015
Belgium, 1 min. 30 sec.

QATAR COWBOY SCENE
Dir. Robbert&Frank Frank&Robbert, 2015
Belgium, 3 min. 30 sec.


9-23_banner

KIM RICHARDS GOT ARRESTED AT TARGET
Dir. Joey Huertas aka Jane Public, 2003-2013
USA, Total Running Time: 86 min.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 – 7:30 PM
** Joey Huertas aka Jane Public in attendance! **

Millennium Film Workshop and Spectacle present an evening of film screenings by experimental filmmaker Joey Huertas–aka Jane Public. The screening will included I Need You; Missing Green; I’m not Jesus; Nice People; and I really think it’s a Black and White incident.

Active since the early 1990’s, Huertas has divided his time between social work and his practice as a filmmaker. The complex cinematic research that Huertas deploys extracts–at first sight–of a general violent layer exposing the state of a type of social schizophrenia. Using re-enactments, obscurity and sound sources within many of his films, the stories depicted are personal misers of broader social actions constantly shifting between private and public concerns.

The background upon which Huertas’ works take place can be described as ‘clinical fiction.’

I NEED YOU
Dir. Joey Huertas aka Jane Public, 2004
USA, 37 min.

MISSING GREEN
Dir. Joey Huertas aka Jane Public, 2007
USA, 9 min.

I’M NOT JESUS
Dir. Joey Huertas aka Jane Public, 2013
USA, 3 min.

NICE PEOPLE
Dir. Joey Huertas aka Jane Public, 2008
USA, 26 min.

I REALLY THINK IT’S A BLACK WHITE INCIDENT
Dir. Joey Huertas aka Jane Public, 2003
USA, 11 min.


9-30_banner

TRIP AND GO NAKED
Dir. Chris Fiore, 2004
USA, 74 min.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 – 7:30 PM
** Chris Fiore in attendance! **

TRIP AND GO NAKED is a defiantly, deliriously, and joyously, obscene film. TRIP falls squarely into a time honored tradition of underground cinema, breaking sexual barriers and flaunting taboos, the film is a cavalcade of performances intended to titillate, shock, and terrify.

TRIP AND GO NAKED documents a transgressive variety show that took place in the dead of night over the course of the sweltering New York summer of 1995. Shot in the East Village’s famous Pyramid Club, the film chronicles the efforts of the indomitable Mistress Otter and her band of merry perverts, constantly upping a twisted ante in an escalating series of emotionally intense and dangerous performances. Though it’s definitely not a film for the squeamish, one of the big surprises here is that it’s also quite funny.

In 2004 TRIP AND GO NAKED won the Excellence In Sexual Theater award at the Arlene’s Grocery Picture Show and was featured at The Coney Island film festival.

Celebrating the twentieth anniversary of its shooting, this Millennium Film Workshop screening will be the third time this rarely screened film will be witnessed by the public.


image from the film ROMA ©2004 by Jacob Burckhardt

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 MINUTES (WHY GO ANYWHERE)
Dir. Jacob Burckhardt, 2000-2015
USA, ~70 min.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14 – 7:30 PM
** Artist in attendance! **

A series of short poetic documentaries shot by Jacob Burckhardt in various places around the world between 2000 and this year. Some in black and white film, some in color video, some in-between. Impressions of a curious pedestrian. Sky light, dancing, night. Italy, New York, Sri Lanka, Estonia, Japan, New Jersey and more.

Over the years Jacob Burckhardt has worked a variety of jobs: blueberry picker, steel mill laborer, Fuller Brush man, truck driver, taxi driver, camera repairman and photographer. He has done sound recording, edited and mixed the sound of many independent movies and teaches at the Cooper Union and the Pratt Institute.

His films include two features: IT DON’T PAY TO BE AN HONEST CITIZEN (1984) with William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg and Vincent D’Onofrio, and LANDLORD BLUES (1986); four featurettes in the series “Black Moments In Great History” (a collaboration with Royston Scott and Gerard Little AKA Mr. Fashion); A GUIDED TOUR OF EDITH’S APARTMENT, a “talking head” documentary about the 90-year-old artist. His movies fall into two categories: comedies and poetic documentaries concerned with texture, atmosphere and presence.


1021_banner

STRING THEORY: RECENT WORKS BY ROBERTA FRIEDMAN & GRAHAME WEINBREN
Dir. Roberta Friedman & Grahame Weinbren, 1976-2015
USA, ~70 min.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21 – 7:30 PM
** Artists in attendance! **

A program of recent films including STRAIGHT FROM BERTHA (1976-2015) and LETTERS (1997-present).

“STRAIGHT FROM BERTHA is straight from the heart. From the mind, it is hardly straight. The Gertrude Stein epigraph—“Everything being alike everything is different simply different naturally simply different”—prescribes the profoundly recursive style of the film will take, starting, as the film does, with the minimalist, structuralist, looping film-within-a-film, appropriated from an earlier era, 1976, then folding into that film new material from many earlier and later eras, generations, and themes, including film history, film language, film style, film institutions, family history, biography, and autobiography.” -Ron Green, from “Notes on Straight from Bertha,” 2015.


1028_banner

FILMS BY TIM GERAGHTY
Dir. Tim Geraghty, 2013-2015.
USA, ~70 min.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 28 – 7:30 PM
** Artist in attendance! **

3D visions. Plagues of cicadas. Charred forests, crowded subways, the monkey’s hand. Basements. Old cars. Soiled spots, torn extensions. Movies for each of your eyes. Binocular visions and locked doors. Mushrooms, dashboards, a walk to the store. Window planes, bending floors. Psychology. Food. Decapitation. Somehow these movies all make sense.

Program includes:
SOMETHING MIGHT HAPPEN, 2013, 16min (Anaglyph 3D video)
RAVEN AND DOVE, 2014, 11min (Anaglyph 3D video)
HERE COMES EVERYBODY, 2014, 10min (bipacked 16mm film)
NOVEL, 2015, 22min (Anaglyph 3D video, live optical sound performance)

Tim Geraghty is a film & video artist in the avant-garde tradition working largely with stereo 3D. His work has shown at the Rotterdam International Film Festival, Anthology Film Archives, the London Institute of Contemporary Art, Microscope Gallery, Flaherty NYC, and the International Film Festival Oberhausen. He is currently completing a documentary he has edited and co-directed. Born and educated in Providence, Rhode Island, he now lives and works in Queens, NY.


11-4_banner

DIVIDING ROADMAPS BY TIMEZONES: FILMS BY AMANDA DAWN CHRISTIE
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2000-2010
Canada, Total Running Time: 71 min.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4 – 7:30 PM
**Amanda Dawn Christie in attendance!**

This program of work is a survey of ten years of her practice from 2000-2010. These films reflect Amanda Dawn Christie’s restless growth as an artist. Moving from hand processing to optical printing, contact printing, and performance, she layers memories and images in an effort to explore her past. Train trips, relationships, and her efforts to plumb the depths of the image all contribute to an ever changing evolution of her work.

“Amanda Dawn Christie traces the proximity and distance between places and people, images and memories; experiences, sensations, thoughts. Christie works the surface and the deeper materiality of film to trace the perpetual motion of subjectivity […] Analogous to a series of letters from one to another, Christie etches fragments of a life lived and places traveled into the fabric of the film medium. ”
-Scott Birdwise – Canadian Film Institute-

HERE
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2000
Canada, 3 min
Super 8, BW, silent

One of Christie’s first films, this hand processed super 8 film was created as a part of Helen Hill’s Ladies Film Bee . Twelve women in Halifax were invited to each shoot a roll of super 8 film edited in camera, and then after handprocessing in Helen’s bathtub, they spent an afternoon of tea, chit-chat, cucumber sandwiches and film animation at the kitchen table.

FOREVER HOLD YOUR PEACE
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2003
Canada, 1 min
16mm, colour, hand scratched sound

Live actions with hand scratched sound, this film presents the frustration of feeling the need to speak with nothing to say. Filmed by the artist’s husband at the time, the film also relates to subtle complexities of communication within marriage.

TURNING
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2004
Canada, 9 min
16mm, BW, silent

Throughout the journey, meanings that symbols once held for us shift and change as black and white blend to form grey. We see ourselves reflected in the world around us and the world around us envelops us. Things that were once threatening become comforting arms of solace while things that were once sanctuaries threaten to drown us. Water has the power to cleanse as well as the power to drown while the forest is both protective and foreboding.

This film was originally projected onto a wall of melting ice as a part of the Quiet Triptych performance

PLAYING JACOB
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2005
Canada, 3 min
16mm, colour, optical sound

Loosely exploring the historical weight of institutionalized religion , and its relationship to individual spirituality, the filmmaker places herself into the Jacob myth of the Pentateuch. She plays the role of Jacob in an attempt to come to terms with her religious upbringing, and her anxious ambivalence towards her own agnosticism. Inspired by the in-camera techniques of the early cinema of Meliese, the film and all of its special effects were shot and edited in-camera.

16MM POSTCARD
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2005
Canada, 3 min
16mm, BW, optical sound

A diaristic film in which the filmmaker comes to terms with her new life in Vancouver, “16mm Postcard” is a bittersweet letter back home to the Atlantic Filmmakers Cooperative in Halifax. Like in any letter, it becomes painfully obvious that one can never fully communicate an experience or a longing, and the result is a series of random tidbits that point to a larger experience.

KNOWLEDGE OF GOOD AND EVIL
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2005
Canada, 1 min 25 sec
16mm, colour, silent

This film is an abstract exploration of the tension surrounding women and stereotypical representations of their knowledge. This film was created from footage shot at Phil Hoffman’s independent imaging retreat (aka “the film farm”) in Ontario as well as from footage shot in Vancouver. All of the footage was hand-processed, and some of it was contact printed by hand and treated in baths of potassium ferricyanide. The final film was created through various optical printing techniques.

THIS UNNAMABLE LITTLE DREAM: OR A TRACED SKETCH OF TWO BROTHERS
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2005
Canada, 3 min
Super 8, BW, silent

A personal narrative about the end of a marriage inserted into an homage to the Brother’s Quay. This film was commissioned for the Splice This Remake This program.

MECHANICAL MEMORY
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2006
Canada, 5min
16mm, BW, optical sound

Created from super 8 footage that was shot in the 1970s of the family dogs and the trains that my father worked on, this film explores the decay of memory and image. The super 8 film grew fungus while stored in a basement. It was then optically printed up to 16mm and slowed down so that the snowflake shaped fungus could be studied. Narration presents fragmented stories of childhood memories. This film was created as a source film, which was later physically cut up and reprinted with a flashlight to destroy the image and sound for the subsequent film “Mechanical/Animal Memory” which is owned by the NFB.

3PART HARMONY: COMPOSITION IN RGB #1
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2006
Canada, 6 min
16mm, colour, optical sound

This experimental dance film employs a bastardized version of the 1930s three strip Technicolor process. Shot entirely on black and white film through color filters, the images were recombined into full color through optical printing techniques, one frame at a time. The gestures in this dance work explore the psychological fracturing and reunification in representations of the female body.

A MATERNAL RECORD NOT FULLY RECORDED
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2006
Canada, 3 min
Super 8, colour, live sound

A look at our attempts to preserve the past in home movies and photographs, and the disparity between the actual lived events and the mnemonic objects. Super 8 home movies from the 1970s show my mother and myself as a toddler, blowing bubbles and riding horse back. The original super 8 footage was transferred to video, then filmed back onto super 8 from a television monitor in an attempt to translate the memories from medium to medium degenerating and deteriorating with each transfer.

FALLEN FLAGS
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2007
Canada, 8min
16mm, colour, optical sound

A layered tapestry of trains and underwater footage exploring the realms of fear death and transience, this film places the traces of human voices amidst the flickering light and shadows of empty passenger cars. This film Stems from a train trip from one end of Canada to the other and back again, and the loss of a friend in a drowning accident. This project involved 15 days of train travel from Vancouver to Halifax and back again (1200 km in total).

POINT A – > POINT B
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2009
Canada, 3 min
Super 8, BW, double system sound

Created for a program of Acadian films curated by Mario Doucette for 8fest. This film is a meditation on identity, geography, and language; Je viens d’Acadie, mais je ne suis peut-être même pas Acadienne; est-ce que c’est la langue? la géographie? l’histoire?

V=D/T
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2008
Canada, 7min 36 sec
16mm, colour, optical sound

This film explores the possibility of measuring distances between loved ones through time zones. The sound track is comprised of personal and tragic phone messages left on voicemail when individuals could not connect due to great time zone differences, while the visual elements present simple and contemplative images of antique telephones, on handprocessed colour film, using a modified steenbeck as a contact printer.

TRANSMISSIONS
Dir: Amanda Dawn Christie, 2010
Canada, 15 min
Expanded cinema performance for two 16mm projectors, optics, and radio

An improvisational performance for analogue and digital technologies that explores radio waves and dreaming; satellites and ideas; wireless internet and cell phones; television and radio broadcasts; all of these signals contribute to complex interconnected webs of invisible landscapes and invisible architectures passing through our bodies in every time and in every space.

___

Amanda Dawn Christie is a Canadian artist working in film, video, performance, photography, and electroacoustic sound. Since 1997 she has been involved with artist run centres, serving on boards, working as a technician and later as a director, teaching workshops, publishing, and serving on juries across Canada. She completed her MFA at the SFU School for the Contemporary Arts in Vancouver, before moving to Amsterdam. Upon her return to Canada she worked as director of the Galerie Sans Nom and the RE:FLUX music festival. She left the gallery last year to work as a full time artist.


11-13_banner

MILLENNIUM FILM WORKSHOP MEMBER’S SHOW
Curated by Lili White
Dir: Various, Various
Total Running Time: 73 minutes

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 7:30PM
**Curator and artists in attendance!**

This is a Members show of filmmakers involved with MILLENNIUM FILM WORKSHOP. There is no theme, no style, no philosophy or anything that connects these works together. Each presents an individual filmmaker work through their own personal cinema. – Lili White, curator

ZULEIKA DOBSON (digital)
Dir: Catherine Corman
2 min, 41 sec

MARIETTA (16mm)
Dir: Adele Friedman
5 min
“Marietta” was filmed in Vienna, Austria, in an apartment building that has been in her family since the aught years of the 20th century. The film is in black and white, which suits the interior of mementoes and heirlooms, family portraits and souvenirs of eras past. Yet Marietta is extremely energetic and contemporary in her approach to life.

BABEL (digital)
Dir: Margot Niederland (Theremin Music: Llamano)
4 min, 40 sec
A meditation on the consistency of change. I shot this footage on 16mm film and double exposed it in-camera. During my residency at The Experimental TV Center, I used one of their old analogue machines and turned its dials and knobs to create the effects.

EAST RIVER PAVILION, UPPER EAST SIDE, NYC (16mm to digital)
Dir: Barton Lewis
3 min, 4 sec
A study of a rusting steel truss bejeweled with flaking paint at the East River Pavilion.

WISCONSIN CHEESE QUILT 1 (digital)
Dir: Peter Kingsbury
3 min
This is quilted from still and moving digital captures I made at a Wisconsin cheese and root beer oasis. Over several months I had become fascinated with my wife’s art practice transition from painting to quilting. Pondering images from our recent transcontinental road trip, I suddenly thought of quilting them -though I could not imagine the process or result. I still can’t -which is a refreshing change in my art practice. I have plans for more quilts. I find that sewing timelines raises interesting questions about drama and decoration.

STARFISH AORTA COLOSSUS (8mm to digital)
Dir: Lynne Sachs and Sean Hanley
4 min, 30 sec
NYC poet Paolo Javier invited Sachs to create a film that would speak to one of his poems from his book COURT OF THE DRAGON (Nightboat Books). Sachs chose Stanza 10 from Javier’s poem “Starfish Aorta Colossus”. She then collaborated with film artist Sean Hanley to edit the film. Together, they traveled through 25 years of unsplit Regular 8 mm film that Sachs had shot
including footage of the A.I.D.S. Quilt from the late 1980s, a drive from Florida to San Francisco, and a journey into a very untouristic part of Puerto Rico. Throughout the process, they explore the syntactical ruptures, the celebration of nouns and the haunting resonances of Javier’s poetry.

THE DOGS OF SPACE (digital)
Designed by Michael Betancourt
3 min
This narrative fuses documentary, scientific, fictional and abstract glitch footage into a composite story, dramatizing the launch of two Soviet space dogs, Belka and Strelka, into orbit. It explores glitch and realism, where the two are held in tension against each other: a balance between the abstracting and representing functions of digital imaging. In this
trajectory between realism and the geometric, the formal dimensions of digitally encoded motion transform live action footage into something else by shifting between the surface flatness of pixels and their organization into particular, recognizable subject matter. This engagement is distinctly semiotic: recognizable imagery as signifier (earlier, quoted work) in an arrangement and context that changes the meaning of concepts such as “Heavens and Earth” to provide a visionary subtext to scientific exploration. The immanent identification provided by archival material is essential. By using twentieth century scientific and public domain footage, these explicit quotations enable a synthesis, drawing attention to my reuse. Glitching functions syntactically in this fusion; linking shot-quotations while at the same time providing inflection that changes the imagery’s meaning separately from issues of montage or sequence. The continuous flow of imagery is precisely the point to this process: there is only a limited distinction between one “shot” and the next, eschewing montage for the continuity of the long take data stream of the digital file. The results are neither edited nor animated, but a hybrid recognizable as the “morph” where one image becomes the next seamlessly by degrees of change over time. These technically-generated transformations give rise to both the abstracting and representing dimensions of the imagery equally.

THE GAME IMPROVES AS A SPECTACLE (Super 8 /animation to digital)
Dir: Guy Kozak
2 min, 26 sec
A contest between Yellow and Blue and another phase in Guy Kozak’s ongoing exploration of the aesthetics and psychology of American Football. Shot on the field in Super 8.

SNEAKING UP ON PEOPLE (digital)
Dir: Jonathan Mittiga
3 min
Visit www.plermpt.com for more info!

IN THE FOOTSTEPS (16mm to digital)
Dir: Jacob Burckhardt, 2009
13 min, 4 sec
A trip through Jordan, following the footsteps of Jean Louis Burckhardt, the explorer who was the first European to see Petra in hundreds of years. Shot in 16mm B&W.

GUILTY
Dir: George Spencer, 2014
3 min, 33 sec
From a performance in Berlin

[T] (digital)
Dir: Philippe Leonard (Sound by Jefre Cantu-Ledesma)
12 min
[T] is a film at the limit of cinema, an experiment in the moving image where stillness and movement converge on each other to produce an experience of time as space. Philippe Leonard shot the footage for this remarkable work at Times Square, in New York City, during the hours of artificial illumination. Partly for this reason, it is an oneiric diary, tempted by myth and, at the same time, suffused by a melancholy sense that myth has lost its magical power. Faces appear and disappear in spasmodic waves of light, which emanate from billboards and mobile telephone screens and confuse the boundary between the organic and the artificial. The dilation of time and the miniaturization that that enables in [T] also ensures that the momentary betrayal of excitement, suspicion, attraction, hesitation, boredom and relief that traverses these faces approaches pure physicality. A smile, a blank stare, a fluttering eyelash: what the film permits us to encounter in these isolated elements is a materiality drained of eroticism, a society of bodies beneath the neon signs, where the market has abducted everything and everyone. The meticulously edited image track is brilliantly echoed in a sound track that renders the underground subway as a haunting residue and subtext. Times Square is a stop on the subway line; [T] is a film that arrests the mania of that space, giving to the viewer a rare experience of visual redemption.” – Rosalind Morris

ALVARO (digital)
Dir: Jean Sousa (Music: A.Vitorino d’Almeida, Lyrics: Jose Saramago, Sung by: Misia)
6 min, 13 sec 6.13
A meditation on loss, based on a poem written by Alice Goncalves Sousa about the death of her brother Alvaro. Using Nature used as metaphor for the fragility of life and including archival photographs and material objects left behind by one who passed, it embodies the spirit of Fado, Portugal’s urban folk music.

SUHAIL AND THE ONE HAVING CROSSED OVER
Dir: Anna Kipervaser (Sound: Freesound/Yle Archives & Anna Kipervaser)
5 min, 55 sec
Before he was known as Canopus, he was called Suhail. And before that his name was Osiris. In all documented cases, he had two sisters, one of whom was left behind. She always signals the coming of an other, bigger than she. Their legend lives on to this day; each night the two sisters mourn him – and their separation – across the great heavenly river.

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (digital)
Dir: Catherine Corman
4 min

FELONY COMICS CRIME SPREE #3

CRIMESPREE3

Negative Pleasure is pleased to announce the latest installment of our ongoing series, the Felony Comics Crime Spree, in celebration of the debut of Felony Comics #3, an anthology of underground crime comics featuring new work by Brigid Deacon, Ben Passmore, Pete Toms, Thomas Slattery, Amy Searles and Harris Smith, with a cover by Kid Space Heater creator Josh Burggraf and a never before seen pin-up of Michel Fiffe’s Copra!

For such a monumentously criminal undertaking, we have dug deep into the annals of cinematic crime and unearthed two little seen tales of delinquent malefaction. All shows $5, make an evening of it.


DAY OF THE WOLVES
Dir. Ferde Grofé Jr, 1971
USA, 95 min.
In English.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 – 7:30 PM

In this post-Western, neo-noir heist film, a cadre of bearded thieves, each identified only by number, with no name, conspire to rob an entire town. Clad in black jumpsuits and wielding submachine guns, they have little trouble taking the whole village’s populace hostage, but Sheriff Pete Anderson isn’t going to take that kind of antisocial behavior lying down. Outmanned, outgunned, and with the lives of his family, friends and constituency at risk, Anderson fights back! Starring noir veteran Richard Egan (SLAUGHTER ON 10TH AVENUE) and venerable Borchst Belt comedian Jan Murray (aka Uncle Raymond on “My Two Dads”).


DRUG RUNNERS
Dir. Alan Kuskowski, 1988
USA/Mexico, 86 min.
in English.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 – 10:00 PM

Featuring one of the last performances by once-great character actor Aldo Ray, DRUG RUNNERS hits all the marks a low-budget 80’s action thriller oughta. The bad guys are bad, the good guys play by their own rules. There are sports cars, blazing Uzis, big hair, desperate chases across the Mexican border and a flustered chief who’s getting way too old for this shit. The specifics, if they matter, involve a hotshot Mexican cop and his beautiful partner infiltrating a ruthless smuggling carter in a mission that’s more out for vengeance than justice. Gunfights ensue. Directed by Alan Kuskowski (FIRST STRIKE).


REVOLT
Dir. J. Shaybany, 1986
USA/Persia, 72 min.
In heavily dubbed English.

FRIDAY,  SEPTEMBER 11 – MIDNIGHT

Written by the enigmatically named Shield, this US-Persian co-production features yet another cop-on-the-edge squaring off against yet another band of ruthless drug dealers, this time set against the racial tensions set off by the Iran hostage crisis. Shot without sound and weirdly overdubbed, Revolt is a schizophrenic mess of a movie (i.e. perfect for a Spectacle midnight) that can’t decide whether it’s a hard-hitting, socially conscious crime drama or a goofy, lighthearted action comedy. Fortunately, the filmmakers lacked the ability to appropriately orchestrate either, and the result is a near-hallucinatory mess of inscrutable plot developments and character flourishes. Whatever the intent, Revolt is one of the most consistently entertaining hidden gems of 1980s action cinema!

SEPTEMBER MIDNIGHTS

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4: MONDO BIZARRO
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 5: MONDO FREUDO

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 11: REVOLT
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12: THE FORBIDDEN

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18: RUBY
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19: THE DEAD DON’T DIE

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25: NINJA WARS


RUBY
Dir. Curtis Harrington, 1977
USA, 84 min.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 – MIDNIGHT
** One night only! **
** Don’t miss this month’s Harrington shorts! **

To call Ruby an EXORCIST/CARRIE knockoff (Piper Laurie starred in both, this film a year after CARRIE, also it’s about possession, which everyone on IMDB knows never appeared in a film before Friedkin) misses the point entirely: rather than being the story of an ostracized teenage girl and her overbearing mother, it’s the story of Ruby, a one-time gangster’s moll turned single mother, drunk and drive-in owner who begins receiving messages from her rubbed-out hood boyfriend through their mute child Leslie. Bodies begin piling up, with employees at the drive-in meeting a series of grisly ends, and Ruby’s ever-tenuous grip on reality slides into madness. Harrington’s love of southern Gothic and period pieces is in full display here, as always more interested in creeping dread than shock. Best known via a TV edit often played on midnight creature features (re-edited and with additional material shot without Harrington’s approval, possibly by Stephanie Rothman, leading to Harrington removing his name from the TV edited version), the copy we’ll be playing is the uncut theatrical version, closest to Harrington’s original vision. Beloved by Leni Riefenstahl, it’s a film only Harrington could have directed.


the-dead-dont-die-banner

THE DEAD DON’T DIE
Dir. Curtis Harrington, 1975
USA, 74 min.
In English

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 – MIDNIGHT
** One night only! **
** Don’t miss this month’s Harrington shorts! **

Perdito is dead! His body is merely an instrument through which I speak. The dead are my children!

“Not too long after The Killer Bees was completed, Doug Cramer offered me another Robert Bloch story from the pages of Weird Tales to direct. The Dead Don’t Die was about zombies and took place during the depths of the depression. I was once more back in the period territory of What’s The Matter With Helen?, and I loved it.” -Curtis Harrington, Nice Guys Don’t Live In Hollywood

The 70s was a golden age for TV horror, from tv shows (Night Gallery, Circle Of Fear, Kolchak The Night Stalker) to films like DARK NIGHT OF THE SCARECROW, DON’T GO TO SLEEP and BAD RONALD. By 1975, Harrington was well into his TV career, or as he called it, his “slippery slope”. Of his many TV projects, THE DEAD DON’T DIE is among his best, making the most of Harrington’s attention to period piece detail, his taste for the Gothic and his love of casting actors best know from earlier work, with Joan Blondell, Ray Milland and Yvette Vickers (Attack of the 50 Foot Woman) joining George Hamilton all doing great, moody work. It’s a film about as far away from the action-film-pretending-to-be-horror status of the contemporary zombie film, the entire film drenched in timeless night, an occult atmosphere permeating everything, perfectly balanced against the pulpy detective quality of a man seeking to clear his brother’s name descending into witchcraft and madness. By turns chilling, paranoid and absolutely lovely, it’s a perfect demonstration of Harrington’s sullen style in a format which, for a short time at least, proved a suitable pairing. Never released on DVD or Blu-Ray!


ninjawars4

NINJA WARS
Dir. Kôsei Saitô, 1982
Japan, 95 min.
Japanese dubbed in English

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 – MIDNIGHT
** One night only! **

Good fantasy needs some missing pieces. Just as we mumble increasingly nonsensical arguments in bed to prepare ourselves for dreams each night, films that transfer us to another world sometimes need to be defended for their irrationality. Does THE NINJA WARS have a lot in the realm of character development? It really could not have less. Does it need any to make us care about these characters who decide in an instant they love or hate each other? Also no. Is plot often shoehorned into exposition scenes that offer the barest pretext for random groups of men dressed in exotic period costumes to slaughter each other while our main characters wait patiently in the middle of the affray? Yes. But are those fights awesome? Also yes.
THE NINJA WARS is a beautiful film, camera and special effects departments come together and diverge in an elegant counterpoint of daring composition and extreme gore, criteria of excellence Japanese filmmakers have thankfully never thought of separating. It’s also beautifully blocked, thanks to the mechanistic Kabuki aesthetics that give every little movement, of every completely retarded dramatic scene, the same quality of dance as the fights.

There is something like a real story still shining through from novelist Futaro Yamada’s source material. Yamada also wrote the novel that became Oshima’s PLEASURES OF THE FLESH, a much more coherent drama about a misogynist chasing pieces of an ideal woman across various female bodies. The same exchange in WARS has a reverse meaning. The forces of evil need a woman to legitimate their power, she in turn offers them a series of counterfeit versions of her likeness. In the process she is constantly becoming more abstract, losing her head, then her life, then her any identity independent of her twin, ultimately arriving back in her true love’s arms as nothing more than the principle of self-determination, represented by a symbol of Western values, the crucifix. These were principle concerns of Yamada’s, who was famous not only for pulp novels about ninja wars, but also the bitterness of a postwar generation that viewed Japanese society as a “pile of acorns with zero regard for personal independence or uniqueness.” That uniqueness is denied brutally in FLESH, and only regained in WARS as the faintest promise amid overwhelming, violent nonsense.

For the staggering and delirious in our midnight audience, who look to the ninja war genre for simpler satisfactions, we can promise the following: some (limited, but fruitful) screen time for Sonny Chiba, projectile vomiting monks (who can fly), doppelgänger succubi, an impressive variety decapitation scenes, and a love story that does not require any serious attention to the dialogue to enjoy.

MONDO NOWHERE – THE WAY OUT WORLD OF LEE FROST

In 1966 R. Lee Frost was a filmmaker with some nudie cuties (SURFTIDE 77) and Dave Friedman-written roughies (THE DEFILERS) under his belt. He’d spend the year combining pre-existing footage of weirdness around the world with his own high-powered lens examinations of the seedier side of Los Angeles (and beyond) to create three of the stranger examinations of the Mondo film. Episodic, problematic, lurid and ready to swing, these three films offer viewers a peek behind the forbidden curtain to witness scenes they’ve only read about in the tabloids. With re-enactments, staged scenes, and completely out of context clips from European stag reels cut into live documentary footage, it’s a constantly shifting collection between peepshow and freakshow. Generally free of the animal cruelty that marks European mondo films, it was aimed much more toward theaters of the arts like the Pussycat Theater than basement arthouses, during which Frost perfected his use of POV he’d later use in films like ZERO IN AND SCREAM and the Video Nasty Nazi nightmare of LOVE CAMP 7. Those of you who came out for WITCHCRAFT 70 know about Lee Frost’s ability to cut European Mondo into American Smut and will find all three of these films in the same lascivious mode. Welcome to the far side of the peephole! Welcome to MONDO NOWHERE!


MONDO BIZARRO
Dir. Lee Frost, 1966
USA, 76 min.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 – MIDNIGHT
** One night only! **


MONDO FREUDO
Dir. Lee Frost, 1966
USA, 76 min.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 – MIDNIGHT
** One night only! **


THE FORBIDDEN
Dir. Lee Frost, 1966
USA, 68 min.
(US edition, modified from the original)

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 – MIDNIGHT
** One night only! **


AUGUST MIDNIGHTS

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1: AND GOD SAID TO CAIN

FRIDAY, AUGUST 7: TOXIC ZOMBIES
SATURDAY, AUGUST 8: TOXIC ZOMBIES

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14: THE EMBALMER
SATURDAY, AUGUST 15: THE EMBALMER

FRIDAY, AUGUST 21: LASER MISSION
SATURDAY, AUGUST 22: NINJA MISSION

FRIDAY, AUGUST 28: MY CHAUFFEUR
SATURDAY, AUGUST 29: THE HORROR OF PARTY BEACH


godsaidtocain-banner

AND GOD SAID TO CAIN
Antonio Margheriti, 1970.
96 min. Italy/West Germany.
In German with English subtitles.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 – MIDNIGHT

In this macabre spaghetti western, the Duke of Delirium, Goth Kinski, gives a rare, heroic and unquestionably leading role as a man released after ten years of wrongful incarceration in a prison labor camp. Once sprung, he meanders his way back to town to get revenge on the men who framed him — one of whom has since become a wealthy and politically powerful land baron with dozens of hired guns on the payroll.

The plot may be traditional, but the movie is anything but: AND GOD SAID TO CAIN is notorious as of the darkest spaghettis ever made, and closer in tone to Italian horror films of the period than traditional westerns. It’s the most accomplished picture of underrated director Antonio Margheriti, best known for gothic horror films like CASTLE OF BLOOD and THE LONG HAIR OF DEATH. CAIN is an effortless synthesis of the two genres: in a largely wordless performance, Kinski assumes an almost phantasmagorical aura, and eerie shootouts take place under moonlight and in churches and candlelit quarters. The film’s baroque, blazing climax — think the of funhouse shootout of THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI restaged in Hell — validates the film’s German title, SATAN DER RACHE — “Satan of Revenge.”

Though AND GOD SAID TO CAIN frequently languishes in washed out transfers in YouTube and public domain purgatory, tonight we’ll show a pristine digital transfer with the German-language soundtrack that preserves Kinski’s original spoken dialog.


TOXIC ZOMBIES
aka Bloodeaters
Dir. Charles McCrann, 1980
USA, 89 min.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 7 – MIDNIGHT
SATURDAY, AUGUST 8 – MIDNIGHT

We return with the second examination of some of the lesser-know films to pop on on Mary Whitehouse’s list of “sadist videos”, criticized for their combination of sex. violence and cruelty. What the Nurse With Wound list was to experimental music weirdoes, the Video Nasty List became a must-see list for those lurking in dingy basement video stores. For contemporary viewers, it’s easy to think of such a list as silly and tame, but it’s worth keeping in mind this list wasn’t really about gutmunching gore effects — for most of these films, it’s the cavalier combination of giddy bloodshed and unrepentant deviancy sneaking into suburban homes any time little Janey and Johnny skipped down to the video rental store. Many of these films are now considered classics (POSSESSION, TENEBRAE, I SPIT ON YOUR GRAVE, THE LAST HOUSE ON YOUR LEFT) while others will still turn even lifetime Fangoria readers green (ANTHROPOPHAHOUS, LOVE CAMP 7, CANNIBAL HOLOCAUST), but with the Video Nasty Project we’re taking a look at some of the lesser-known films to appear on the list. Do you dare to watch them all?

Deep in the forest, a group of pot farmers get into a Ruby Ridge situation with some corrupt US agents, who then spray the crops with some kinda psychedelic that turns the farmers into zombies. That’s the setup, but director/writer/actor Charles McCrann (in his only film) isn’t here to give you a ton of backstory: he’s here for zombies in the woods, Romero-style anti-establishment rhetoric and a general vibe that’d sit nicely with BURIAL GROUND or THE LIVING DEAD AT MANCHESTER MORGUE. With all the washed-out grungy deep woods darkness and flanging score you’d expect, we’re delighted to bring you TOXIC ZOMBIES!


embalmer-banner

THE EMBALMER
aka Il mostro di Venezia
Dir. Dino Tavella, 1965
Italy, 77 min.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 14 – MIDNIGHT
SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 – MIDNIGHT

“How lovely you are! Like alabaster goddesses. No living woman possesses your mysterious fascination or your sweet repose.”

Welcome to Venice! It is one of the most picturesque cities in the entire world with its beautiful architecture dotting the murky waters of the grand canal. Our story begins here with a series of disappearances. All of the disappearances have something in common, the missing are all young ladies who just happened to have disappeared close to a canal. The police suspect that the missing young ladies may have fallen into the water and drowned, but none of the bodies have been recovered. Meanwhile, a reporter from a local paper begins to suspect that the disappearances are the work of some fiend who is kidnapping young women and hiding their bodies deep in the Venetian canals. The city is in a state of panic! How many more girls can possibly disappear?! Well, about nine more because just around the corner is a group of lovely young ladies visiting from Rome and they are just dying to explore Venice. Which one of the girls will be the first victim of this fiend? Who is the mysterious fiend and what is this fiend doing to the bodies of these young ladies?

THE EMBALMER is an early Giallo film that reads like a travelogue film with a touch of gothic imagery. The city of Venice and its labyrinthian canals take the place of the ancient stately manor found in gothic tales. Macabre tinged scenes are scattered throughout the film like that of a pop musician emerging from a coffin to sing songs to an unsuspecting crowd and a crypt full of petrified monks a la Capuchin crypt. THE EMBALMER is a must see for all Giallo fans.


LASER_MISSION_BANNER LASER MISSION
Dir. BJ Davis, 1989
USA, 84 min.
English.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 21 – MIDNIGHT

Before he was THE CROW (but definitely after his LEGACY OF RAGE), Brandon Lee was Michael Gold – a cocky, self-righteous asshole who upends his fully free agent status and chooses to accept a LASER MISSION on offer from the CIA (but, like, eschewing CASH MONEY USA in favor of action man SWAGGER ethics). There’s something about the WORLD’S LARGEST DIAMOND gone missing, along with some LASER expert (expertly lazied by ERNEST BORGNINE) being held in Angola (or somewhere) by the KGB (or Cuban military or some Austrian madman or something). All this adds up to is TROUBLE and the potential END of the WESTERN WORLD as we KNOW IT. When not donning gross disguises to fool bumbling cartoon humans, Gold is totes in NEGGING WAR III with terminal television episoder DEBI MONAHAN (who may or may not be portraying a daughter or a double agent or whatever).
Even if you HAVE seen LASER MISSION, you won’t want to MISS our special WIDESCREEN presentation, with all the EXPLOSIVE action (and sometimes admittedly great wide tracking shots) as NEVER BEFORE SEEN in domestic US BARGAIN BINS and FIFTY-FILM DVD collections.
If you HAVEN’T seen LASER MISSION, then grab your favorite brand of adult diapers and head the hell over here. Sounds appealing? Then make like an ORANGE and GET JUICED.

ninjamission-banner

NINJA MISSION
Dir. Mats Helge Olsson, 1984
Sweden, 93 min.
In English.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 22 – MIDNIGHT

** Part of our “Lasers vs. Ninjas” Weekend Spectacular! **


my_chauffeur_header

MY CHAUFFEUR
Dir. David Beaird, 1986
USA, 97 min.
In English

FRIDAY, AUGUST 28 – MIDNIGHT

“You ever give an Alka-Seltzer to a dog?”

Endless Bummer heads from the 70s to the 80s with our final film, MY CHAUFFEUR. Starring Deborah Foreman, who was *everywhere* in the eighties (Valley Girl, Real Genius, Waxwork, April Fool’s Day), as Casey Meadows, a dishwasher who receives an invitation to work for the prestigious Brentwood chauffeur company directly from the company’s owner (none other than the great E.G. Marshall!). Disliked by the all-male staff and barely tolerated by her boss (Howard Hesseman of WKRP/Rubin and Ed fame), Casey takes on a series of insane jobs, from lugging drunken rock band Cat Fight around LA to dealing with a spoiled stalker’s heartbreak (if you suspect this may lead to love, you’re right) and none other than Penn and Teller playing an sheik and a con-man attempting to lure him out of his money. Despite all odds, Casey’s non-conformist streak leads her to triumph where the other stuffed-shirt drivers fail miserably. A staple of cable tv during the late eighties and one of the final Marimark Productions films, MY CHAUFFEUR hits all the rom-com notes while offering plenty of off-color comedy and topless hijinx for the midnight crowd. Drive off into the sun setting over the Pacific as Endless Bummer finishes up…FOR NOW!


horrorpartybeach-banner

THE HORROR OF PARTY BEACH
Dir. Del Tenney, 1964
United States, 78 min.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 29 – MIDNIGHT

“Weird Atomic Beasts Who Live Off Human BLOOD!”

horrorofpartybeach650

Let’s go to the beach! What a wonderful place to get away with its sparkling blue water and radioactive monsters! Well, more like the radioactive living dead for you see radioactive waste is being dumped into the ocean and as a result the remains of the poor souls littering the ocean floor have been mutated into humanoid fish-like monsters! Monsters that have chosen to make their first appearance on the sunny shores of Connecticut! The monsters have decided to crash a happenin’ beach party that is being presided over by none other than surf rock legends The Del-Aires! All the girls and boys were too busy doing the zombie stomp to notice the monsters crawling up on land and feasting on the blood of bikini clad beauties! Can the blood thirsty rampage of these monsters be stopped?

THE HORROR OF PARTY BEACH is one of the first, if not the first horror beach party film. Think of it as BEACH BLANKET BINGO, but filled with blood thirsty monsters whose mouths look like they have been stuffed with a pack of hotdogs. It is a refreshing freudian slap in the face to those “wholesome” beach party films. The film is beautifully shot and features some fantastic sequences like the creation of the monsters. It’s funny, creepy, and the music of The Del-Aires will have you groovin’ all night long. What are you waiting for? Let’s go to the beach!

partybeach_poster

JULY MIDNIGHTS

FRIDAY, JULY 3: AMERICAN HUNTER

FRIDAY, JULY 10: GURU THE MAD MONK
SATURDAY, JULY 11: HORROR EXPRESS

FRIDAY, JULY 17: DON’T ANSWER THE PHONE!
SATURDAY, JULY 18: NEON CITY

FRIDAY, JULY 24: MALIBU BEACH
SATURDAY, JULY 25: THE POM POM GIRLS

FRIDAY, JULY 31: INSEMINOID


AmericanHunter_Banner

LETHAL HUNTER aka AMERICAN HUNTER
Dir. Arizal, 1988.
Indonesia. 92 min.
Indonesian dubbed into English with Japanese subtitles.

FRIDAY, JULY 3 – MIDNIGHT

“With the information in this study, the wrong people could start a panic on Wall Street that would bring the Western World to its knees…”

In mononymous Indonesian action maestro Arizal’s star-spangled shoot-’em-up, Christopher Mitchum, former 2012 Republican candidate for California Congressional District 24’s United States House of Representatives seat, stars as Jake Carver, an “agent” whose self-described occupation is to “fight bad guys.” As the AMERICAN HUNTER, Carver battles a multifariously evil organization over a piece of microfilm to unspecified ends. Highlights include a jeep driving off the side of one skyscraper into the window of another, a three-way motorcycle/pick-up truck/train chase, a baby being run over by a car crashing through the side of a supermarket yet miraculously surviving, an eight minute helicopter chase, an awkwardly clothed shower sex scene, one house explosion, one castle explosion, dozens of car explosions, male bondage and electrocution, and a fist fight inside a dungeon full of what appears to be cardboard boxes overflowing with shredded paper. Bill “Super Foot” Wallace stars as the bad guy whose nefariousness is conveyed through his variously keeping pet falcons and monkeys on his shoulder, and RAMBU’s Peter O’Brien drops in for an unlikely turn as a hench villain who gets the shit kicked out of him then has his legs run over then crashes through a brick wall on the hood of a car. Approximately ten of the 92 action-packed minutes have been described.


guru_banner

GURU THE MAD MONK

FRIDAY, JULY 10 – MIDNIGHT


horror_express_banner

HORROR EXPRESS
Dir. Eugenio Martin, 1972.
90 min. Italy/UK.
In English

SATURDAY, JULY 11 – MIDNIGHT

In this essential Trans-Siberian classic, the great Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing are rival anthropologists aboard a train en route from China to Moscow housing a crate with an amazing discovery: a primitive humanoid creature. The problem is, the creature’s body itself is the vessel for a shapeless, ancient alien entity hopping from body to body as hosts suck the memory, knowledge and brains from their victims. Lee and Cushing must combine their scientific expertise to understand and conqueror the otherworldly, demonic menace. In the meantime, Telly Savalas shows up as a domineering Cossack officer, and Argentinian spaghetti western star Alberto de Mendoza plays a nefarious, mad monk who renounces his faith and pledges his devotion to the ancient evil. Like THE THING re-written by Paul Theroux aboard a bullet train to hell and featuring creepy, eye-bleeding make-up effects, freaky blazing-eyed zombies and top-notch performances by Lee and Cushing, HORROR EXPRESS is a total classic!


dont_answer_the_phone_heade

DON’T ANSWER THE PHONE!

FRIDAY, JULY 17 – MIDNIGHT


NeonCityBanner

NEON CITY
Dir. Monte Markham, 1991
USA, 101 min.

SATURDAY, JULY 18 – MIDNIGHT

“Take a deep breath: it may be your last.”

As the dust settles from Mad Max: Fury Road, some of us here at Spectacle figured it was time to blow the dust off of Monte Markham’s high (but technically running-on-low) octane dystopian action disasterpiece NEON CITY, starring the one and only Michael Ironside. Tasked with transporting a gorgeous prisoner (Vanity – yes, that Vanity) across a frozen desert hellscape via overcrowded megabus, Ironside’s flinty-eyed and ponytailed bounty hunter Stark gets bumped into by it all: motorcycle gangs of mutants, cannibals, gearheads, a pissed-off ex-wife and a bus driver nicknamed “Bulk” – played by Oakland Raider Lyle Alzado, who died a year after reaching Neon City – who he personally sent to prison for five years. Spellbinding chase sequences as needless post-oxygen hijinks ensue long before the inevitable Wizard of Oz-xeroxing conclusion.


malibu_beach_header

MALIBU BEACH

FRIDAY, JULY 24 – MIDNIGHT


the_pom_pom_girls_banner

THE POM POM GIRLS

SATURDAY, JULY 25 – MIDNIGHT


inseminoid_header

INSEMINOID
Dir. Norman Warren, 1981
UK, 93 min.
In English.

FRIDAY, JULY 31 – MIDNIGHT

Before we get into the whole gynonightmare of this film, there’s a few things you need to know about INSEMINOID. It was partially financed by Run Run Shaw (If you’ve EVER been to Fist Church you know Shaw Bros.), it was written by Nick Maley (a make-up artist who’d later work on Krull and Lifeforce) and Gloria Maley (who did a series of British tv shows under the name Gloria Walker), the only script either would ever write, and was directed by Norman J. Warren, who brought us Satan’s Slaves and Prey, all of whom try to put a twist on the tale told by Alien a few years earlier. There’s a really nice synth score, a slew of actors any Hammer fan would happily recognize (Stephanie Beacham, Victoria Tennant, Judy Geeson), and some genuinely nice twists on the Ridley Scott/Dan O’Bannon model. That being said, you should take that title seriously: there is alien-on-astronaut non-consensual sex, and while it’s not as freakish as Xtro it definitely makes this film a midnight special. But hold onto your Gender Studies textbooks, because our glowing mother, dewy in the radiance of the miracle of childbirth, has a hunger…FOR BLOOD! There’s a bit of a The Thing/Body Snatchers twist here as well, but perhaps I’ve said too much…Playing one night only, one of the strangest Video Nasties, and definitely a film you’ll be telling people about (if you dare), INSEMINOID is a film we’ve promised for a while and are proud to deliver midnight July 31!

JUNE MIDNIGHTS

FRIDAY, JUNE 5: ENDLESS BUMMER: THE VAN
SATURDAY, JUNE 6: ENDLESS BUMMER: VAN NUYS BLVD.

FRIDAY, JUNE 12: LES EBRANLEES
SATURDAY, JUNE 13: DELIRIUM

FRIDAY, JUNE 20: ENDLESS BUMMER: THE VAN
SATURDAY, JUNE 21: LES EBRANLEES

FRIDAY, JUNE 27: ENDLESS BUMMER: VAN NUYS BLVD.
SATURDAY, JUNE 28: DELIRIUM


ENDLESS BUMMER

the_van_banner

THE VAN
Dir. Sam Grossman, 1977
USA, 92 min.

Later retitled Chevy Van to make the most of the Sammy Johns song in the soundtrack (despite the fact that the van in the film is a Dodge), The Van was the second of the Marimark Pictures series (the first being last year’s Superchick) and absolutely the best place to start our Endless Bummer series. Stuart Goetz (who later went on to a long career in film music; he won a daytime Emmy for his work on ALF!) plays Bobby, a red-blooded red-headed Californian who wants nothing more than to graduate high school and invest his life savings in his brand-new custom van, the (ahem) Straight Arrow. Bobby’s desperate attempts to turn himself into a van guy and find decadent imbroglios by the moonlit Pacific are not as easy as he hoped; between his increasingly complicated nature of his relationship with Tina (Deborah White — both White and Goetz would go on to be in the brain-rot epic Record City), the bad advice of his best buddy Jack (Harry Moses) and his boss Andy (DANNY DEVITO!), not to mention the constant bullying from local thug Dugan (Steven Oliver, who we’ll meet again later in this series) — how the hell is Bobby supposed to do any FUN TRUCKIN’? Van expos, boneheaded pranks, drunk driving, tasteful plot-required nude scenes — no, this is not a hidden gem of west coast cinema verite’, it’s a drive-in movie about vans, and that’s all right with me.


van_nuys_blvd-banner

VAN NUYS BLVD.
Dir. William Sachs
USA, 93 min.

William Sachs, probably best known for The Incredible Melting Man and Galaxina, here presents the story of a young man wanting to leave behind his boring life to make the cruising scene on Van Nuys Blvd, from the Santa Monica Mountains at the north through the San Fernando Valley to the Verdugo Mountains in the south. Half American Graffitti, half drive-in beach romp, it’s held together buy our lead, Bill Adler, who played Steve in The Van! He’s back as Bobby, who spends a crazy weekend meeting the locals: strippers, carhops, dopers and cops, but specifically old-school hot-rodder Chooch (David Hayward), who is sort of the grand master of Van Nuys. Did I mention ’74 Playmate of the Year Cynthia Wood plays Moon, and Melissa Prophet (who later had roles in Goodfellas and Casino) as Camille? PLUS go-karts, an adorable beach dog, hassling the man, all the LA cruising action you can handle and a badass disco-funk theme song! C’mon and meet us on the boulevard!


Les Ebranlees

LES EBRANLEES
aka Vibrating Girls
Dir. Jess Franco (as Clifford Brown), 1972
France, 81 min.
In French with English subs.

“You wanted to go to the house of vice. Well, we’re going now.”
For Franco aficionados, LES EBRANLEES makes an interesting double feature with SINNER–THE SECRET DIARY OF A NYMPHOMANIAC: both released in 1973, both featuring stories of strippers lured into an underworld of crime and violence, both focused on a detective desperately searching for the truth. In the case of LES EBRANLEES, that detective is none other than Franco staple Howard Vernon as Al Pereira in search of the murderer of a prostitute. Definitely a film that lives up to the Eurosleaze tag, it’s long been one of the rarest of Franco’s 70s films.


delirium_banner

DELIRIUM
aka Le foto di Gioia
Dir. Lamberto Bava, 1987
Italy, 94 min.
In English

Originally helmed by Dario Argento, who dropped out of production at an early date and was replaced by one of his proteges, Lamberto Bava (son of the great Mario Bava, assistant director on everything from Suspiria to A Bay Of Blood to Cannibal Holocaust), DELIRIUM shifts our understanding of what a giallo is from the seventies to the eighties without a hint of nostalgia. Starring the almighty Daria Nicolodi (whose tumultuous marriage to Argento ended in 1985) and the stunning Serena Grandi (who you scuzzballs probably know from Anthropophagus), DELIRIUM is a glossy, flashy mid-80s Italian Vogue spread streaked in crimson. Serena Grandi plays Gloria, one-time prostitute turned head of a men’s fashion magazine called Pussycat. She begins receiving photos of her models murdered, disfigured, and displayed with photos of Gloria in the background. While the magazine drastically increases its readership due to the notoriety surrounding the murders, the noose closes in on Serena With lots of demented POV (where the killer imagines his victims with grotesque masks over their heads), lots of extra-sleazy Dynasty-inspired wardrobes, and drum machines aplenty, it’s an excellent example of where the giallo was by the mid-eighties, happily delivering all the style, perversity and murder set pieces any fan could want in a style entirely different from (but obviously deeply informed by) the 70s classics we most often think of as giallo. More from Lamberto (and fellow Argento protegee Michele Soavi) hopefully coming soon later this year!

MILLIGAN MIDNIGHTS

Milligan Midnights banner

SATURDAY, MAY 2: SEEDS OF SIN
FRIDAY, MAY 15: SEEDS OF SIN
SATURDAY, MAY 16: THE BODY BENEATH
FRIDAY, MAY 29: THE BODY BENEATH

There is no director like Staten Island’s own Andy Milligan. Made under extreme conditions, with miniscule budgets, Milligan makes seemingly simple horror flicks into nightmarish melodramas seething with rage, lust and hatred. Do they look cheap? Does everything seem entirely real? No? PAY ATTENTION. Milligan’s camera moves in ways so deeply foreign to viewers, and develops storylines closer to his early work staging Lord Dunsany and Jean Genet plays, that it’s no wonder he’s got his fair share of detractors (Stephen King said of The Ghastly Ones “the work of morons with cameras”), but over the years a small but fanatical following has formed, willing to look deeper into these films. Assisted by the late, great Mike Vraney of Something Weird, a tireless collector of Milligan original prints, and given deeper personal context thanks to Jimmy McDonough’s heartbreaking book The Ghastly One: The Sex-Gore Netherworld of Filmmaker Andy Milligan, the time is long overdue for a reconsideration of his work (thankfully recently begun in the UK by BFI as assisted by Vraney and director Nicholas Winding Refn), and with our Milligan Midnights series, we hope to bring a series of his films to Spectacle Midnights in the hope that Milligan himself might crack a rare smile from his unmarked grave somewhere in LA.

“I don’t see how anyone can write off Andy Milligan as just an exceptionally strange exploitation hack when his films are full of these beautiful eerie moments contained in these compositions that can last for a minute + or just a second because his weird camera is always moving and twisting and making your eyes travel in ways you’d never have expected them to…I can’t think of anyone else who’d have filmed a scene in which a woman lets her vampire cult leader into the house to have his minions bite her husband this way!” –Zynab Hashim



Seeds of Sin banner

SEEDS OF SIN
Dir. Andy Milligan, 1968
USA, 84 min.

SATURDAY, MAY 2 – MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY, MAY 15 – MIDNIGHT

“Sown in Incest! Harvested in Hate!”

Carol Manning takes the liberty to invite her siblings to a Christmas dinner at her familial home much to her mother’s displeasure. The members of the Manning family have not seen each other in years due to the resentment they have for each other. The only “love” that exists amongst them is limited to the incestuous affairs that they engaged in behind their mother’s back as children. The only tie between the siblings is the hatred they feel for their mother Claris. Claris is an aging widow who has survived many marriages and has amassed a large fortune as a result. She “dislikes” her children very much would rather not see any of them ever again. She feels that her children are like vultures flying overhead awaiting for the first sign of her death so they can swoop in and pick her pockets clean! Fortunately for the vultures, death is lurking just around the corner! For there is a murderer on the loose in the Manning estate! This shadowy figure is killing off members of the Manning family by orchestrating a series of “accidents”. Who could it be? Will Claris’s fortune survive? Who will reap THE SEEDS OF SIN?

SEEDS OF SIN has all of the trappings of a gothic tale. There is a stately familial home, dark secrets, incest, rape, murder and to top it all off there are beautiful roses featured throughout the entire film! Yet, unlike a “traditional” gothic tale, Seeds focuses on a Matriarchy instead of a Patriarchy. The story features several dominant female characters. These female characters greatly exert their power over the male characters in the film. It is a truly refreshing twist to the gothic “formula”. Think of it as a version of “Fall Of The House Of Usher”, but with more sex and violence and a lessened threat of being buried alive!

SEEDS is one of Andy Milligan’s greatest and most personal films. Andy is telling us the story of a broken family that is eerily similar to his own. He is breathing through his wounds in every frame. The overwhelmingly dominant female theme which is often explored in his work is presented here in full bloom in the form of Claris who is very similar to Andy’s mother. The character of Buster is like Milligan as a young man. The weak and down trodden paternal figure is a mirror image of Andy’s father. Seeds literally is Andy Milligan’s horrific family life scarred into celluloid. Sadly, SEEDS, like many other Milligan films has been tampered with badly by the greedy little hands of producers who wanted to make a buck selling sex. There are several “hardcore” scenes that have been edited into the film so that it would be more profitable. As a result certain scenes that were shot by Andy have been lost. Luckily, there is a trailer for the film that has pieces of some of the “lost” scenes from the film.

Always remember “Nothing can kill a bitch like momma!” Long Live Andy Milligan!


The Body Beneath banner

THE BODY BENEATH
Dir. Andy Milligan, 1970
UK, 82 min.

There is no director like Staten Island’s own Andy Milligan. Made under extreme conditions, with miniscule budgets, Milligan makes seemingly simple horror flicks into nightmarish melodramas seething with rage, lust and hatred. Do they look cheap? Does everything seem entirely real? No? PAY ATTENTION. Milligan’s camera moves in ways so deeply foreign to viewers, and develops storylines closer to his early work staging Lord Dunsany and Jean Genet plays, that it’s no wonder he’s got his fair share of detractors (Stephen King said of The Ghastly Ones “the work of morons with cameras”), but over the years a small but fanatical following has formed, willing to look deeper into these films. Assisted by the late, great Mike Vraney of Something Weird, a tireless collector of Milligan original prints, and given deeper personal context thanks to Jimmy McDonough’s heartbreaking book The Ghastly One: The Sex-Gore Netherworld of Filmmaker Andy Milligan, the time is long overdue for a reconsideration of his work (thankfully recently begun in the UK by BFI as assisted by Vraney and director Nicholas Winding Refn), and with our Milligan Midnights series, we hope to bring a series of his films to Spectacle Midnightd in the hope that Milligan himself might crack a rare smile from his unmarked grave somewhere in LA.

“I don’t see how anyone can write off Andy Milligan as just an exceptionally strange exploitation hack when his films are full of these beautiful eerie moments contained in these compositions that can last for a minute + or just a second because his weird camera is always moving and twisting and making your eyes travel in ways you’d never have expected them to…I can’t think of anyone else who’d have filmed a scene in which a woman lets her vampire cult leader into the house to have his minions bite her husband this way!” -Zynab Hashim

SATURDAY, MAY 16 – MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY, MAY 29 – MIDNIGHT

“Tonight is the yearly meeting. We must have the sacrifice.”

We begin with THE BODY BENEATH, a film Milligan made during his time in the UK. First-timers may find the film “talky” or “chatty” — that’s Milligan, and you’ll either get into it or you won’t. There’s a hypnotic slowness to Milligan’s films, which is one of the main reasons the “let’s see some boobs and blood” crowd never took to him, no matter how much green-faced nightgown action we get. And we get a LOT of it, with vampire lord Reverend Algernon Ford (played by Gavin Reed) realizing his pure bloodline was dying out after centuries of inbreeding. He seeks to find the non-vampire members of his bloodline and convert them, all of which sounds about right for a midnight, but it’s Milligan’s teeth-grinding misanthropy which brings us to a different level, so far from the laughable kitch it may at first seem. With one of Milligan’s best actors, Berwick Kaler, playing the hunchback Spool and a (comparably) larger budget than his earlier films, plus a jaw-dropping orgy of cannibalism that must be seen to be believed, It’s arguably one of the best entry points to his work. We have a slew of other Milligans coming up, so don’t sleep! Ever! MILLIGAN MIDNIGHTS SHALL NEVER DIE!

“Few filmmakers can boast of having a recognisable style, but when you see a Milligan movie, you are in no doubt whose film it is. He was sort of a Douglas Sirk figure – there’s so much subtext in his movies. And the more you get into them, the more you realise that they were made by someone who was very tormented, and very intelligent; a sensitive man who used film as an artform to express his views on life.” -Nicholas Winding Refn