& OTHER WORKS: KEREN CYTTER

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WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 20

SCREENINGS AT 8 AND 10 PM

“& Other Works” is a series of screenings focusing on film and video from contemporary artists organized by C. Spencer Yeh. “& Other Works” is an informal communal viewing experience, away from the white walls and passwords.

For November, we welcome Keren Cytter, with a program surveying her short-form works from the last few years. We may be biased towards the silver screen, but we think these cinematic fever dreams are the paramount expressions of Cytter’s artistic practices – a restless trajectory traversing fiction, choreography, poetry, theater, etc.

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VIDEO ART MANUAL
Dir. Keren Cytter, 2011.
DE. 15 min.
English, German w English subtitles.

OPEN HOUSE (3D)
Dir. Keren Cytter, 2011.
DE. 8 min.
English.

CORRECTIONS
Dir. Keren Cytter, 2013.
DE. 8 min.
English.

FOUR SEASONS
Dir. Keren Cytter, 2009.
DE. 12 min.
English.

LES RUISSELLEMENTS DU DIABLE (WHISPERS OF THE DEVIL)
Dir. Keren Cytter, 2008.
DE. 10 min.
French w English Subtitles.

DER SPIEGEL
Dir. Keren Cytter, 2008.
DE. 5 min.
German w English Subtitles, English.

SOMETHING HAPPENED
Dir. Keren Cytter, 2007.
DE. 8 min.
German w English Subtitles.

What’s that saying? Something about sticks and stones?

How often do you entertain that yearn “nothing is real” and that “nothing is happening”? Cytter employs the lurid signifiers of “action” as we’d call it in cinema. I wouldn’t necessarily say that she “makes it her own” – who wants to really claim ownership of the crappy gestures crafted by some other jerk-off dudes? What’s that thing about dramatic tension? Something about someone pulling a gun to get the conflict pumping? A drop of blood to get everyone’s attention? It’s ok – we are not being asked to question positions in the cultural hegemony – after all, one video contains the taboo-boo of a dude jerking off. It’s a cock, it’s hard, it’s being pulled. Adult content. The elephant in the room is being electrocuted. The spectacle is maintained. We’ll be providing the 3D glasses for Cytter’s “Open House.”

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Let’s try this again – here’s some borrowed (not appropriated) excerpts from a 2011 press release:

“In her films, Cytter explores stories of love, violence, sex, jealousy, betrayal and murder told in non-linear narrative in which time overlaps and characters mutate. The actors repeat lines, switch roles and recite directions aloud creating a shared lexicon through repetition and rhyme. Cytter’s fractured stories, suggestive of dream and memory, are often inspired by direct experience and observation but are filled with literary references, cinematic quotes and clichés drawn from popular culture that result in works that are existential dramas composed from seemingly incompatible genres.

In the film (Video Art Manual), Cytter offers a historical analysis of video art and its development the last forty years, focusing on the conditions of how contemporary video art is produced, installed and consumed.

In addition to films and works on paper, Cytter is the author of several novels and an opera libretto and the founder of D.I.E. NOW (Dance International Europe Now), a dance and theater company.” – Zach Feuer Gallery

Keren Cytter was born in Tel Aviv in 1977. She studied at The Avni Institute in Tel Aviv and received her degree from de Ateliers in Amsterdam. Cytter’s work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; Moderna Museet, Stockholm;Tate Modern, London; Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam; Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig, Vienna; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin and Kunsthalle Zürich. Her work was included in the 53rd Venice Biennial; Found in Translation, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; 8th Gwangju Biennale; Manifesta 7, Trentino; and Talking Pictures and K21 Kunstammlung Nordhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf.

 

& OTHER WORKS: TOM THAYER

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23RD

TWO SCREENINGS – 8 AND 10 PM – ARTIST IN ATTENDANCE

MORE DETAILS TBA!

“& Other Works” is a series of screenings focusing on film and video from contemporary artists organized by C. Spencer Yeh. “& Other Works” is an informal communal viewing experience, away from the white walls and passwords.

Maybe you don’t know the particular shadow that the October moon casts for us here at the Spectacle, but in its quaint darkness we like to call it Spec3ber – the numerical affectation being that it’s the third in our fledgling history. Nothing is ever easily defined or agreed upon with us, except that Halloween is a month-long event. And since & Other Works is even younger, we like to learn by watching and following along with our guardian – stealing make-up, smoking pretzel sticks, and pretending our shoe is an iPhone. So, it’s with great pleasure that this Spec3ber we have the fantastical works of the inimitable Tom Thayer.

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Let’s start off by saying that really in order to get the whole picture, you may need to attend one of Thayer’s fully three-dimensional performances or installations. However, in keeping with the &OW ethos, we’ll be focusing on JTV – Just The Video. Nothing will be lacking however, as all the unsettled lanky angles and smeared colors of his paintings, sculptures, music and his etcetera and ephemera are fully in effect and incorporated. In fact, as &OW hopes, being served by the flat faceful will put you even further in the zone.

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The program will survey Thayer’s video works from his earliest animation “Phantasmagoria” on through music videos for both his own music as well others (e.g. NYC’s finest No Neck Blues Band), and on to later works regularly incorporated into aboveplugged performances and installations. We’re pretty excited to give them the proper &OW “microcinematic” attention and reception.

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Thayer has gone on record more-or-less saying his methods and materials are decidedly kept to a period of time in which he feels comfortable and connected working within. So, that’s masking tape and cardboard, crude cuts and jagged circuits; Thayer coaxes every bit and blurp of curdle and mist out of his tools. Though a particular unplaceable nostalgia may be provoked in sampling his work, Thayer is no more a retro-fetishist than you would be using your great-grandparents’ armoire, because that shit is built to last.

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It’s hard to really describe the vibe without getting into some words like “haunting,” “playful” and “surreal” but those words are loaded with blanks these days. Likewise, we can get into talking about collage, stop-motion, marionettes, analog video, oscillators, and drum machines. Then there’s the thin gaunt birds, rainbow omelette mountains, and children with crushed faces only mothers with crushed faces could love. Or we can just say there’s something about how every element just lands beautifully and properly in Thayer’s hand and vision that we had no choice but to use “inimitable” earlier.

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& OTHER WORKS: MELANIE GILLIGAN

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18TH

CRISIS IN THE CREDIT SYSTEM and SELF-CAPITAL at 8 PM
POPULAR UNREST at 10 PM

ARTIST IN ATTENDANCE
ONE NIGHT ONLY

“& Other Works” is a series of screenings focusing on film and video from contemporary artists organized by C. Spencer Yeh. “& Other Works” is an informal communal viewing experience, away from the white walls and passwords.

For September we welcome artist Melanie Gilligan, writer and director (and editor and etc). Originally deployed online in episodic form, &OW brings you these three tales of crisis, self, and unrest – uninterrupted. We’ll take care of clicking “play next” – you just sit back and enjoy. Gilligan will be present this evening and available for questions, should you have any.

In case you couldn’t tell from the titles, the primary inspiration and subject matter of these works is our contemporary capitalist economic system. Choosing to dramatize instead of document inserts subjective loops within that vast and obtuse tangle of snakes and ladders – when we receive information, we process with all our defenses and criticality; when we see stories, we can’t help but search for a niche or foothold. Gilligan borrows frames and devices from popular media to build an accessibility, but retains license to break free from the expectations binding more commercial attempts basted with similar info-sauce (neither Margin Call nor Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps depicts a floating computer graphics cube speckled with disembodied limbs).

SELF-CAPITAL
Dir. Melanie Gilligan, 2009.
UK. 24 min.
English.

No more is this evident than with Self-Capital, in which an individual named “Global Economy” undergoes extensive psychological evaluation and experimental therapy. Having recently experienced a traumatic breakdown, we follow Global Economy from her initial diagnosis, through sessions and body-actualizing exercise, to the final prognosis (for now). The same actor portrays all roles, flattening any figurative reading of casting decision and gender portrayal, not to mention a certain, uhhh, economy in filmmaking ;-).

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CRISIS IN THE CREDIT SYSTEM
Dir. Melanie Gilligan, 2008.
UK. 38 min.
English.

“A major investment bank runs a brainstorming and role-playing session for its employees, asking them to come up with strategies for coping with today’s dangerous financial climate. Role-playing their way into increasingly bizarre scenarios, they find themselves drawing disturbing conclusions about the deeper significance of the crisis and its effects beyond the world of finance. Crisis is the result of extensive research and conversation with major hedge fund managers, key financial journalists, economists, bankers and debt activists.” – courtesy of the artist

You could call Crisis in the Credit System a dark comedy, except that the scenarios and lingo are expressly presented intact – there is no need to embellish or satirize to elicit the type of nervous laughter in the face of total madness. With alarming prescience, Crisis was in production during, and released shortly after the collapse of financial services firm Lehman Brothers in 2008.

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POPULAR UNREST
Dir. Melanie Gilligan, 2010.
UK. 71 min.
English.

Popular Unrest is a multi-episode drama set in a future not so different from the present, that is shaped by the convergence of capital, biopolitics and ‘big data’. The film explores a world in which the self is reduced to physical biology, directly subject to the needs of capital. Shot in London with a cast of twelve main actors, the film’s form is partly inspired by David Cronenberg’s ‘body horror’ and American television dramas CSI, Dexter and Bones, where reality is perceived through a pornographic forensics of empirical and visceral phenomena.” – courtesy of the artist

The vision of futuristic society in Popular Unrest doesn’t front as allegory or parody, as other dystopian media visions are often served; the results are intentionally literal and stifling. Detaching the caustic docudrama that drives Crisis in the Credit System, Popular Unrest foregrounds Gilligan’s own speculations on the issues and themes her work is concerned with; she carves the players and the pieces, and fixes the game played. We realize that as fantastical as the teams and rules are, they are no more unreasonable than the working myths constructed to parse the overwhelming systems of economic exchange in our actual times. On top of that,

Here’s the checkboard and pawns of Popular Unrest – “The Spirit” is the ruling belief system, the force by which people are divined. “The Spirit” is a cloud, the inevitable accumulation and deification of society’s collective material and economic aspiration. People work, and any extracurricular activity is regulated to support the ability to work. The individual has no choice but to become mercenary, as individual worth is increasingly defined in isolation. However, eco-systemic chaos despises status quo, so the see-saw is seated with two inexplicable phenomena. There’s “groupings,” in which strangers congregate and bond due to an unidentifiable urge to meet with one another. Then, as counterbalance to these mysterious love-ins, there’s a mysterious floating knife that murders people without warning or apparent reason.

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Melanie Gilligan is an artist and writer born in Toronto in 1979. She currently lives in London and New York and works in a variety of media including video, performance, text, installation and music. Gilligan completed a BA (Hons) Fine Art at Central Saint Martins in 2002 and was a Fellow with the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Independent Study Programme in 2004/5. She has presented solo exhibitions at institutions including Chisenhale Gallery (London), Kölnischer Kunstverein (Cologne), Transmission Gallery (Glasgow), The Banff Centre, (Banff), Franco Soffiantino Gallery (Turin), Justina M. Barnicke Gallery (Toronto), and VOX centre de l’image contemporaine (Montreal). In 2008, commissioned by Artangel Interaction, Gilligan released Crisis in the Credit System, a four-part fictional mini drama about the recent financial crisis. Gilligan has taught widely in Europe and North America, and has appeared in numerous group exhibitions worldwide, including Manifesta 8 (Murcia, Spain) in 2010. Her writings on art, politics and finance have appeared in magazines such as ArtforumTexte zur Kunst and Grey Room and in recent volumes such as Canvases and Careers Today(Sternberg Press) and Intangible Economies (Fillip).

& OTHER WORKS: VARIOUS ARTISTS

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 6TH – TWO SHOWS – 8PM & 10 PM
(SOME) ARTISTS IN ATTENDANCE!
ONE NIGHT ONLY!

“& Other Works” is a series of screenings focusing on works from contemporary artists organized by C. Spencer Yeh. “& Other Works” cools down in an informal communal viewing experience, away from the dry walls and passwords.

It’s August, and time for some SUMMER FUN. AUG!!! A selection of work from v-v-v-various artists are gathered up from under the sweltering sun and slobber-screened in the air-conditioned confines of the goth bodega. Think of the rockets launching in the distance, of ascension, isolation, vacation, summer whites. Wet air leaves us light on words, but heavy on excitement. Soooo load up the van and head to the extreme opposite of the beach – “& Other Works” at Spectacle Theater !

We welcome Rachel Mason, Frank Heath & JJ PEET, and Robert Beatty.

ECONOLINE 1
Dir. Frank Heath & JJ PEET, 2007.
27 min. USA.

Smearing a healthy grip of hardheaded mischievous streak across I-95 in the middling aughts, artists JJ PEET and Frank Heath (as seen on &OW earlier this year) suited up as visor-ly anonymoustronauts for their micro-epic lo-fi spaceplay fantasy Econoline 1. The half-hour vessel propelled by invention and ideals first launched at Videotage Gallery in Hong Kong, Econoline 1 has never landed on these shores…  until NOW:

“Traveling in a Ford Econoline van retro-fitted as a mock spacecraft, two astronauts journey to the surface of the moon and back. This depiction of space travel is superimposed over an actual trip down the east coast of the United States and an illegal speedboat jaunt to the Cuban coastline. The trip was made in eight days, mirroring the timetable of the first Apollo moon landing.” – courtesy of the artists

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WALL
Dir. Rachel Mason, 2001.
6 min. USA.

TERRESTRIAL BEING A TANGELO
Dir. Rachel Mason, 2001.
4 min. USA.

Rolling back to 2001 (the projected year of famed aspirational odyssey) artist Rachel Mason close-encountered a persona dubbed the Terrestrial Being. Ivory-white domed and bodysuited, the Being was first captured on video free-climbing a tall structure on the campus of UCLA (documented in the harrowing and succinct stunt titled Wall). Is the TB a superhuman? An alien? Harbinger? The accompanying 16mm feel-piece Terrestrial Being A Tangelo rears its rear; read the paper:

“Not long before planes attacked the World Trade Center in New York City, the twenty-one year old Rachel Mason was temporarily expelled from school after scaling an eight story building in Los Angeles. The building was Dickson Art Center at UCLA, a building which was thereafter replaced by the Broad Art Center. Mason scaled Dixon without ropes – in the character she would continue to work with for the next decade and beyond: the white helmeted figure called ‘The Terrestrial Being.’ Numerous videos and live performances exist but have rarely been shown. Wall, from 2001 and a 16mm film, also from 2001 entitled Terrestrial Being A Tangelo, a film which has not been presented publicly until now.” – courtest of the artist

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LANDLINE
Dir. Robert Beatty, 2011.
6 min. USA.

UNTITLED
Dir. Robert Beatty, 2011.
3 min. USA.

Who is Robert Beatty? His is a name known in a few circles – circles which he has perverted into his own Venn diagram spelling ROB for quite a few years. Here, &OW admits finding any excuse to show one of Beatty’s earliest forays into video, his own Untitled. Sure, it’s an edit – an aggregation based on simple formal guidelines (of a popular cartoon, no less); but to build such a haunted arc and atmosphere! Untitled is telling us that wind will blow, leaves will wilt, streets will empty – this moment isn’t forever.  As for the puzzle piece Landline, found loosely conspiring with visions of mask obstruction, let’s turn again to the copypaster:

“The terror of contamination through communication.” – courtesy of the artist

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Robert Beatty (b. 1981) is a Lexington, Kentucky based artist and musician. His multi-disciplinary work in the fields of drawing, digital art, sculpture, video, graphic design, and sound often use outmoded technology to yield organic results. Beatty performs experimental electronic music as Three Legged Race and is a founding member of psychedelic noise band Hair Police. He is also a frequent collaborator with artists as diverse as Takeshi Murata, C. Spencer Yeh, Ben Durham, and Robert Schneider of the Apples in Stereo. He has created album art and posters for countless artists in the worldwide underground, and was featured in the latest edition of Kramers Ergot, published by PictureBox Inc., for whom he is working on a book scheduled for publication in late spring 2014. Beatty has exhibited at Institute 193 in Lexington, Land of Tomorrow in Lexington and Louisville, and in group exhibitions in Baltimore and Los Angeles. He has performed at such places as the Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing; Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin; the Gene Siskel Film Center at the Art Institute of Chicago in Chicago; the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati; the All Tomorrow’s Parties Nightmare Before Christmas Festival in Minehead, England; and numerous venues and institutions in New York including the New Museum, Deitch Projects, Issue Project Room, Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, and Canada gallery.

Frank Heath, born in St. Joseph, MO in 1982, lives and works in New York. Last spring, he made his first solo exhibition in New York at Simone Subal Gallery. Two-person shows include Bcc:, with Brendan Meara at Roots and Culture, Chicago (2011), and Econoline 1, with JJ PEET at Videotage Gallery, Hong Kong (2007). Past group shows and screenings include Matter Out of Place at The Kitchen (2012), Someone Has Stolen Our Tent at Simon Preston Gallery, New York (2012), Single Channel at Soho House, Miami FL (2011); Forcemeat at Wallspace, New York (2011); and Suddenly: Where We Live Now at Cooley Gallery, Reed College, Portland, OR; and Pomona College Museum of Art (2008, 2009).

Rachel Mason is an artist from Los Angeles who lives in New York. Her most recent project is a rock opera and film called, The Lives of Hamilton Fish. She is also currently a resident of the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. She has toured, exhibited sculpture, video, and performance at galleries and museums internationally. Her work has been exhibited and she has performed at the Whitney Museum, Queens Museum, Detroit Museum of Contemporary Art, School of the Art Institute in Chicago, Henry Gallery in Seattle, James Gallery at CUNY, University Art Museum in Buffalo, Sculpture Center, Hessel Museum of Art at Bard and Occidental College, Kunsthalle Zurich, Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit, The New Museum, Park Avenue Armory, Art in General, La Mama, Galapagos, Dixon Place, and Empac Center for Performance in Troy, among other venues. Reviews include New York Times, Village Voice, Los Angeles Times, Flash Art, Art in America, Art News, and Artforum.

JJ PEET received his MFA from Yale University School of Art in 2006 and his BFA from the University of Minnesota in 1999.  Recent solo exhibitions include Redling Fine Art, Los Angeles, CA (2013); On Stellar Rays, New York, NY (2012); Gallery Diet, Miami, FL (2013). These exhibitions received numerous reviews, in publications such as Art in America, Artforum.com, ArtPulse, Bomb, Frieze, The Last Magazine, The New Yorker and TimeOut NY. PEET currently lives and work on Earth.

& OTHER WORKS: JUSTIN LIEBERMAN

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26TH – TWO SHOWS – 8PM & 10 PM
ARTIST IN ATTENDANCE!
ONE NIGHT ONLY!

JUSTIN LIEBERMAN: THE DISHWASHER’S SONG & OTHER WORKS from Spectacle Theater on Vimeo.

“& Other Works” is a series of screenings focusing on video and film from contemporary artists, organized by C. Spencer Yeh.

“& Other Works” seeks out artists’ efforts which invite and evoke the cinematic experience, yet are typically looped on crowded walls or locked up in online isolation. “& Other Works” screens beginning to end, in an informal but focused communal viewing experience. In other words – “film, folks, fun.”

For June, we welcome artist Justin Lieberman, who will be in attendance.

THE DISHWASHER’S SONG
Dir. Justin Lieberman, 2002.
17 min. USA.

THE DISHWASHER’S SONG was created over a nine month period while Lieberman worked at the Maharishi Spiritual Center of America in North Carolina. Employed as a  dishwasher (surprise!), Lieberman was tasked with discarding the leftover food from the center’s meal services each night, a ritual he began documenting on video. The resulting culinary downpour conjures thrills from volatile modernist sculpture, to the inventive viscera of gonzo gore movies; an aggregated topography of consumption and meditative essay on the backside of the enlightenment machine.

To cook up the perfect kitchen radio soundtrack, Lieberman plundered via Napster (remember, it’s the early 2000s), collecting and collaging pop music instances of “yeah,” “baby,” and “no.” These three exclamations weave in and out of the fore, composing a colorful choir of cultural cacophony.

Originally presented as a multi-channel audiovisual installation, THE DISHWASHER’S SONG has been adapted into a single-channel work in collaboration with the artist especially for this screening. The mantric excretions of THE DISHWASHER’S SONG build to sustained climax from this presentation; your appetite won’t.

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THE VISITOR
Dir. Justin Lieberman, 2004.
10 min. USA.

THE VISITOR casts Lieberman as a diapered brain alien crash landing straight into a backwoods summer fantasy informed by Easy Rider, El Topo, Fire in the Sky, and the Joseph Beuys joint I Like American and America Likes Me. A cameo from Brion Gysin’s Dream Machine consummates this compact fable of loving a visit, but hating the life.

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FIRST THOUGHT, THEN SUSTENANCE
Dir: Justin Lieberman, 2007.
11 min. USA.

FIRST THOUGHT, THEN SUSTENANCE is described by Lieberman as “something of a structuralist narrative made in collaboration with the artists Jacques Louis Vidal and Kembra Pfahler.” A homeless man in a wheelchair, an SS officer, and a performance artist (Pfahler in full Voluptuous Horror garb) take turns tossing books into a shared oil can fire, while tossing off lines plundered from Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations.

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THE BATH 2051
Dir. Justin Lieberman, 1997.
10 min. USA.

THE BATH 2051 = Aluminum foil Tetsuo cosplay vibes waft through a Jack Smith-haunted bathroom performance document, in Lieberman’s first official video effort.

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Justin Lieberman is an artist, teacher, activist, curator, and critic who has worked extensively in the US and Europe. He has held faculty positions at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Queens College, New York, and Brandeis University, Waltham. He has presented numerous solo exhibitions of his work in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, Miami, London, Paris, Brussels, Geneva, Athens, and Klagenfurt, among others. His work has been reviewed in publications including Artforum, Art in America, The Poetry Project Newsletter, Triple Canopy, Frieze, Useless, Art Review, The New York Times, Bomb, Le Monde, and Le Journal, and is the subject of a monograph published by JRP Ringier.

FRANK HEATH “GRAFFITI REPORT FORM” & OTHER WORKS

GRAFFITI REPORT FORM
Dir. Frank Heath, 2012.
52 min. USA.
INVASIVE SPECIES
Dir. Frank Heath, 2012.
11 min. USA.
ASYMPTOMATIC CARRIER
Dir. Frank Heath, 2013.
10 min. USA.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 29 – 8:00 PM

 

“& Other Works” is a series of screenings focusing on video and film from contemporary artists, organized by C. Spencer Yeh. “& Other Works” seeks out artists’ efforts which invite and evoke the cinematic experience, yet are typically looped on crowded walls or locked up in online isolation. “& Other Works” screens beginning to end, in an informal but focused communal viewing experience. In other words – “film, folks, fun.” The inaugural program features artist Frank Heath, who will be in attendance.

Invasive Species begins as a document of a peculiar request by phone, set against a beautiful day at Green-Wood Cemetery. The exchange meanders into multiple tangents, from parakeets to numerology, while the onscreen events turn bizarrely synchronous. Asymptomatic Carrier, created for this year’s Frieze Arts Fair NYC, flies over the abandoned North Brother Island in the East River. Wikipedia says “now a bird sanctuary, the island is currently abandoned and off-limits to the public… …from the 1980s through the early 2000s it supported one of the area’s largest nesting colonies of Black-crowned Night Heron. However as of 2011 this species has abandoned the island for unknown reasons.”

Graffiti Report Form is described a press release excerpt:

“Heath’s formally complex video Graffiti Report Form, which as the title suggests, was actually submitted to the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. What begins as a first person account of a concerned citizen wishing to report an instance of graffiti in Morningside Park becomes a film within a film and a subtle meditation on history, place, and narrative structure. Shot over a period of five years, this expanse of time is both compressed and extended through a confluence of interventionist gesture, historical anecdote, and fictional narrative. Dystopian survival story in the guise of an urgent militaristic transmission, the film elicits issues of public and private space, the arbitrary nature of anniversary, and the peculiar history of this specific park as the starting place for the infamous 1968 student revolt at nearby Columbia University.”

Frank Heath, born in St. Joseph, MO in 1982, lives and works in New York. Last spring, he made his first solo exhibition in New York at Simone Subal Gallery. Two-person shows include Bcc:, with Brendan Meara at Roots and Culture, Chicago (2011), and Econoline 1, with JJ PEET at Videotage Gallery, Hong Kong (2007). Past group shows and screenings include Matter Out of Place at The Kitchen (2012), Someone Has Stolen Our Tent at Simon Preston Gallery, New York (2012), Single Channel at Soho House, Miami FL (2011); Forcemeat at Wallspace, New York (2011); and Suddenly: Where We Live Now at Cooley Gallery, Reed College, Portland, OR; and Pomona College Museum of Art (2008, 2009).