Author: Spectacle

MATCH CUTS PRESENTS: YVONNE RAINER’S PRIVILEGE (SOLD OUT)

PRIVILEGE
dir. Yvonne Rainer, 1990.
USA, 103 min.
English

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24 – 8:00 PM
ONE NIGHT ONLY!
Presented by critic and curator Kari Rittenbach

SOLD OUT

Spectacle Theater is excited to collaborate with critical platform Match Cuts on a new series of screenings. This program will be our inaugural event. Scroll down for more information on Match Cuts.

PRIVILEGE, Yvonne Rainer’s sixth feature is a genuinely subversive movie about menopause. Out of a subject that has been virtually invisible on film, Rainer has fashioned a witty, risky work about sexual identity and the unequal economies of race, gender and class.

PRIVILEGE is set in motion by clips from an old black and white educational film, facts and data shot off a Macintosh computer, and a cast of characters with varied, provocative, and often contrasting political critiques. Jenny, the white middle-aged protagonist, agrees to be interviewed by Yvonne, an African-American friend who is making a documentary on menopause. Her candid observations are punctuated by a “hot flashback” of RASHOMON-like intensity, which reveals an experience she has kept secret for 25 years.

“(Rainer’s) most accessible film… Who else could spin hot flashes, Lenny Bruce, Carmen Miranda, and SOUL ON ICE into such a pungent brew?” – The Village Voice

“Fascinating and unpredictable… PRIVILEGE is a ride worth taking.” – The Boston Globe

Match Cuts is a weekly podcast centered on video, film and the moving image. Match Cuts Presents is dedicated to presenting de-colonialized cinema, LGBTQI films, Marxist diatribes, video art, dance films, sex films, and activist documentaries with a rotating cast of presenters from all spectrums of the performing and plastic arts and surrounding humanities. Match Cuts is hosted by Nick Faust and Kachine Moore, and produced by Meg Murnane.

Kari Rittenbach is an art critic and curator based in Brooklyn. Her writing has appeared in Afterall, Artforum, Flash Art, Frieze, and Texte zur Kunst, among others. She has organized exhibitions and events at SculptureCenter, Triple Canopy, Artists Space, and at other non-profit institutions in New York, London, and Berlin.

BORBETOMAGUS: A POLLOCK OF SOUND

BORBETOMAGUS: A POLLOCK OF SOUND
dir. Jef Mertens, 2016.
Belgium, 63 min.
English

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14 – 8:00 PM (SOLD OUT) and 10:00 PM
NYC PREMIERE! Director Jef Mertens in person for intro and Q&A!
GET TICKETS HERE!

A POLLOCK OF SOUND is the first-ever full feature documentary film on the legendary group Borbetomagus. With a current career spanning of 37 years, and still going, this explains a lot.

From 1979 on, Borbetomagus have persevered a ‘no holds barred’ musical style, described and boxed by the media so many times that they remain uncategorized. Coming together in upstate NY, far away from the burgeoning NYC scene, they began having a cult status reaching as far as Northeast Asia. With both saxophone players extending techniques beyond recognition and a guitar player utilizing metal shards besides a plectrum, the band have showcased a whole new vocabulary staying true to the word ‘free.’

Guerilla filmmaker Jef Mertens brings the story previously only written in select underground media, as told by band members Don Dietrich, Donald Miller and Jim Sauter. Made on a low budget string and with the help of many artists, writers, photographers and fellow filmmakers, the film exhibits a raw, urgent, and unpolished vision on a band that has spent almost 4 decades defining and redefining their music.

Starring writer Byron Coley, drummer Chris Corsano, guitarist Thurston Moore, Japanese noise outfit Hijokaidan, Switzerland’s Voice Crack, and a pontificating intro by Jason Gross. With never-before-seen archival footage, amazing photographic finds and even some never before released recordings, the film is a must-see, or must-listen if you will, for every Borbetomagus fan or lover of music that has labored its own definition of what sound should be like.

BIO: Jef Mertens is a self-taught documentary filmmaker hailing from Geel, Belgium. In the early 2000’s he transitioned from his photographic training into moving image exploration while documenting Sonic Youth in “short rough tour diaries.” His first documentary, DRONEVOLK in 2007, followed four acts in the local Belgian experimental music scene. He established his DVD/cassette label (and later production company) Taping Policies in 2009, publishing performances by Tony Conrad and Lee Ranaldo.

 

(IN)VISIBLE: AN EVENING OF MOVING IMAGE X-RAYS

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27TH – 8:00 PM
** ONE NIGHT ONLY! **

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SANCTUS
Dir. Barbara Hammer, 1990.
USA. 20 minutes.

THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER
Dir. James Sibley Watson and Melville Webber, 1928.
USA. 13 minutes.

MOVEMENT OF THE JOINTS BY CINERADIOGRAPHY     
Produced by Nuffield Institute for Medical Research Oxford, 1945.
UK. 16 minutes.
**W/LIVE SCORE BY HIGH WATER**  

In 1990, experimental filmmaker Barbara Hammer explored what is visible beneath the surface of the skin. Digging through the archives at the George Eastman House, in Rochester, New York, she found previously unopened 35mm nitrate films made by Dr. James Sibley Watson in the 1950s. These were among the first experiments using X-ray technology to see what it looks like inside a living body when it moves. Hammer, through photography and painting, renders an intimacy to these X-rays in her 16mm film SANCTUS, with an operatic soundtrack by Neil B. Rolnick. 

The program on Thursday, October 27th will feature three rarely seen films: Barbara Hammer’s SANCTUS; a horror film–an adaptation of Poe’s The Fall of the House of Usher–made by Dr. Watson himself; and a medical tutorial, never before projected, created at Oxford University, of joints moving in flesh and then in X-ray. The Oxford film will be accompanied by an original, live score by High Water.

New York-based musician Will Epstein, aka High Water, is a saxophonist with a psychedelic vibe. A multi-instrumentalist, he also writes and incants his songs. His recent LP–“Crush”–was released on Nicolas Jaar’s Other People label and is available on iTunes and Amazon.

Barbara Hammer is a filmmaker and visual artist who has been making groundbreaking films for over forty years. She is a progenitor of Queer Cinema. Retrospectives of her work have been presented at the Museum of Modern Art, the Tate Modern, and the Toronto International Film Festival, among others.

WHAT’S REVENGE

WHAT’S REVENGE
Dir. Kat Hunt, 2016
US, 52 min.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8 – 10:00PM (NYC Premiere)
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15 – 10:00PM

Filmmaker Kat Hunt in attendance!

ADVANCE TICKETS SOLD OUT!

Innovative new docu-fiction WHAT’S REVENGE by interdisciplinary artist and director Kat Hunt adapts elements from 70’s pulp revenge cinema to address the problems and pitfalls of relationships in the modern age. The film uses a blend of staged reenactments of real events and fictionalized scenarios inspired by the lived experiences of the cast and crew. A feminist piece of genre-bending film, made by an entirely female production team, Hunt plays the chief provocateur in a story of two friends seeking to explain the reason behind the injustices inflicted upon them by the men in their lives. Hunt’s character makes a personal mission of revisiting these indignities upon “the men” in question, on a mission to take their power back in the process. By using non-actors and their stories throughout, Hunt crafts a complex and comedic take on relationships and filmmaking.

THE PROCESS CHURCH x VISIONS IN MAGICKAL CINEMA

Join us as we welcome filmmakers Neil Edwards and Pierre-Luc Vaillancourt for two evenings examining one of the most infamous cults ever, plus a survey of contemporary visual alchemy.


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SYMPATHY FOR THE DEVIL: THE TRUE STORY OF THE PROCESS CHURCH OF THE FINAL JUDGMENT
Dir. Neil Edwards, 2015
UK, 101 min.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 – 7:30PM
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 – 7:30PM

Filmmaker Neil Edwards in attendance!

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Google ‘The Process Church of the Final Judgment’ and you will discover a long list of lurid conspiracy theories. The cult has been accused of being the inspiration for Charles Manson’s ‘crimes of the century’, influencing the assassination of Bobby Kennedy, and being the root of the notorious Son of Sam serial killings.

Formed in 1960s England, many of its members were drawn from wealthy families and aristocracy. Newspapers branded them the ‘Mindbenders in Mayfair’ and ‘The Devil’s Disciples’. Ever since, members of The Process have adopted a secretive stance. Only now, have former members of the inner circle agreed to reveal the truth behind the conspiracy theories, and open up about their beliefs, rituals, and the closely guarded secret of the real power behind it all.

The film gets behind the veils of the cult and tracks their journey from their formation in London’s prestigious Mayfair district, through wilderness experiences in Mexico, flirtations with pop royalty, and their spread state-side that resulted in them being ‘christened’ ‘One of the most dangerous satanic cults in America.’

With contributions from leading former members of the cult, and insights from filmmaker John Waters (who encountered the cult whilst living in New Orleans) George Clinton (who included Process writings on his Funkadelic albums). Plus artist Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, and renowned authors Gary Lachman, Robert Irwin, Gaia Servadio (who infiltrated the group in 1966), and Manson biographer Simon Wells.

SYMPATHY FOR THE DEVIL


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VISIONS IN MAGICKAL CINEMA
Dir. Brian Butler, Carl Abrahamsson & Pierre-Luc Vaillancourt, 2009-2016
TRT: 106 min.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 – 10PM
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 – 5PM

Filmmaker Pierre-Luc Vaillancourt in attendance!

WARNING: This program contains content featuring graphic nudity of a sexual nature. Viewer discretion is strongly advised.

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The manifestation of Nuit, its visions in the hypnagogic fields of cinema. These magickal films are exploring various realms of consciousness, challenging the nature of cinema by their singular artistic visions, esoteric sensibilities and remarkable metaphysical insights.

Resonating with the ideas of great visionaries such as Aleister Crowley, John Dee, Edward Kelley and Derek Jarman, these films are reaching the furthest regions of perceptive ocular vision, where the eyes and the noumenal world unite. Dazzling visual alchemy, hypnotic magnetic pulsations, mesmerizing electronic compositions and beautiful magick rituals resides in these powerful mind-bending films.

NIGHT OF PAN
Dir.Brian Butler, 2009
USA, 6 min.

BABALON WORKING
Dir. Brian Butler, 2016
USA, 9 min.

PHANTOM LIMBS
Dir. Pierre-Luc Vaillancourt, 2015
Canada, 8 min.

AUTOPSY LIGHTS
Dir. Pierre-Luc Vaillancourt, 2015
Canada, 23 min.

SUB UMBRA ALARUM LUNA
Dir. Carl Abrahamsson, 2016
Sweden, 60 min.

SEPTEMBER MIDNIGHTS

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2:  Strawberries Need Rain
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3:  Beyond the Doors

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9:  Strawberries Need Rain
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10Vintage Erotica: Anno 20

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16: Beyond the Doors
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17: Vintage Erotica: Anno 20

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23: Vintage Erotica: Anno 20
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24: Strawberries Need Rain

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30Beyond the Doors

FRESH MASONRY: PRE-BREXIT THRILLS OF JAMES MASON

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Just before his big break in Carol Reed’s ODD MAN OUT (1947), just after training at venerable Old Vic in London, setting the stage for his American debút in Max Ophüls’ CAUGHT (1949), preceding his having been voted the most popular British movie star in every year between 1944 and 1947, in the vein of his more well-known late-40s work in the melodramatic THE SEVENTH VEIL (1945) and adventuresome THE WICKED LADY (1945), always refusing to ever wear make-up on set, precisely at the time that he made the controversial decision to refuse to fight in WWII (estranging him from his family), long anticipating his American stardom—Nemo in the porto-steampunk 20,000 LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA (1954), unforgettable spy Vandamm in a lil’ flick called NORTH BY NORTHWEST (1959), creep H.H. in LOLITA (1962), his late-70s/early-80s genre renaissance—that established his intractable character presence… James Mason made a number of sleeper thrillers before his Brexit to America. We present four of them!!!


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THE NIGHT HAS EYES
Dir. Leslie Arliss, 1942.
UK. 75 minutes.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 – 10:00PM
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 – 7:30PM
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 – 10:00PM

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“The Night Has Eyes (AKA: Terror House/Moonlight Madness) is directed by Leslie Arliss who also adapts the screenplay from the novel written by Alan Kennington. It stars James Mason, Wilfrid Lawson, Mary Clare, Joyce Howard and Tucker Maguire. Music is by Charles Williams and cinematography by Gunther Krampf.

‘You seem to regard me as some sort of male sleeping beauty who is restored to life by your kiss.’

“During the school term break, two lady school teachers travel to the Yorkshire Moors in the hope of finding out what happened to a fellow work colleague who vanished there a year previously. Arriving on the moors at night time, a storm breaks and the two women are thankful to stumble upon an isolated house where somebody is at home. The inhabitant is Stephen Deremid (Mason), a mysterious man who may just hold the key to what happened to the ladies’ missing colleague.

“OK! It’s a stage bound “Old Dark House” film that has noir shadings but is more in keeping with classic Gothic offerings like Jane Eyre, Uncle Silas and Gaslight. The setting is a doozy, a creaky and shadowy mansion with a secret room, add in a storm from hell, the foggy moors that hold secrets along with the patches of quicksand (quickbog?), a seriously brooding leading man greatly troubled by his past, a spunky heroine fronting up for love interest and some possible perilous shenanigans… and you are good to go for some dark deeds and closeted skeletons.

“Director Arliss builds the suspense very slowly, dangling snippets of information that teases the audience as to what might be going on in this shadowy abode. Stephen is a music composer, he is also a veteran of the Spanish Civil War, the effects of which has left him scarred. Why does he take tablets? Why is the moon significant? Now that his house servants have turned up, do they know what happened to the girl last year? It all builds towards the film’s chilling climax, where all is revealed, and not insultingly so.

“The cast all perform well under Arliss’ direction, with Mason honing the brooding lead man act that would serve him so well in his career. Cinematographer Gunther Krampf (Nosferatu/The Hands of Orlac) creates an eerie atmosphere of fog-bound menace out on the moors, and also a foreboding darkened house of shadows for the interior of the Deremid mansion. The slow pace may put some off, and you are asked to forgive one or two dumb character reactions to certain situations, but this rewards the patient and very much it’s a film for Gothic thriller fans to seek out.”

7/10 IMDB Review by Spikeopath from United Kingdom


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THEY MET IN THE DARK
Dir. Carl Lamac, 1943.
UK. 90 minutes.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 – 7:30PM
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 – 10:00PM
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 – 7:30PM

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“To begin, They Met in the Dark is a mystery that is seamlessly turned into a WWII espionage film, all the while remaining a film about two attractive and courageous people gradually falling in love. Analysts of recent vintage who try to watch the film, I suggest, routinely fail to understand its strengths and make too much of its very few weaknesses. It also confuses them because it is a film directed by a Czech, made with British actors, and yet its style is superior U.S. 1940s narrative of unusual clarity, swiftness of pace and occasional brilliance.

“The story involves a young naval officer who is cashiered from the service under suspicion of incompetence (James Mason) and who manages to become involved with a young woman (Joyce Howard) who finds a body and has cause to suspect him of having been the murderer. Following parallel paths–she to clear herself of suspicion in the case and he trying to find the truth about how his career came to grief over his botched assignment at sea–he tries to protect her while she is busy eluding him. The clues lead them both to a Dance Academy cum talent agency, which is really a nest of spies, wherein a quintet of villains has been manipulating innocents and finding a way to extract secret information from British naval officers, such as that knowledge those loss wreaked havoc on Mason’s life. The last portion of the film, maintaining the light-hearted tone carried out throughout the proceedings, becomes an anti-espionage caper led by Mason and a fellow officer, leading to a very satisfying conclusion.

“Carl Lamac (as Karel Lamac) directed with a fluid and amazingly adept camera style, handling varying sorts of indoor and outdoor, group and chase, two-shot and nightclub scenes with extreme skill. Marcel Hellman produced, with music by Ben Frankel, outstanding cinematography by Otto Heller, art direction by Norma G. Arnold and period dance arrangements by Philip Bruchel. The screenplay was adapted from the oft-imitated novel “The Vanished Corpse” by Anthony Gilbert. Others involved in the screenplay included Basil Bartlett, Anatole de Grunwald, Victor MacLure, Miles Malleson, and James Seymour. Phyllis Stanley is outstanding as a singer, David Farrar and Edward Rigby are Mason’s closest confederates. The evil quintet are portrayed by Ronald Ward, powerful Tom Walls as the leader, capable Karel Stepanek, Eric Mason, and Ronald Chesney, aided by Walter Crisham and Betty Warren. Brefni O’Rourke plays a police Inspector, with Kynaston Reeves, Terence de Marney, Robert Sansom, Patricia Medina and Peggy Dexter in supporting roles. As the young woman caught up in intrigue, Joyce Howard is far better here than she had been in the much darker “The Night Has Eyes”; though she lacks some voltage, she is attractive, and more than adequate. As the hero, James Mason gets to essay a great variety of interesting scenes, all of which he performs with convincing and skillful art throughout. He wins the girl in this one, but only after playing a variety of dramatic, comedic and challenging scenes; and as usual; he is able to sustain his character throughout the proceedings and make everyone around him look better than they do in the film at any other time.

“Comparing this delightful film to many routine program films of the war years, I suggest any critic worth his salt would have to applaud the success of this often brilliant entertainment. This is the sort of film people with a positive sense of life used to be able to make; I find it to be one within which complex story elements are made clear and scene follows scene with both logic and a continual sense of discovery. This is a very underrated noir adventure with most successful comedy used to advance the plot at every turn. Recommended.”

8/10 IMDB Review by silverscreen888 from United States


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THE UPTURNED GLASS
Dir. Lawrence Huntington, 1947.
UK. 83 minutes.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 – 7:30PM
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 – 7:30PM
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 – 10:00PM

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“This is a very unusual and intelligent thriller, like most thrillers involving doctors usually are. It is the first of James Mason’s very few own productions and features his own wife, Pamela Mason, here Pamela Kellino, as the second of the two ladies he is involved with, both of them leading to disaster. The intrigue cleverly leads astray at times while at the same time it sharpens as the doctor (James Mason) finds his own case constantly more crucial. He stages a kind of mock trial with himself by giving a lecture at the medical theatre with all rows filled with young attentive students, and one student almost sees through his show and sharpens his case even further. Is he in control or is he not? Has he the right to judge what’s right or wrong or has he not? The film poses many questions, and the questioning becomes increasingly more critical, until in the end he is faced with the final trial as a doctor, when an emergency calls on him to perform one more brain surgery. It’s the doctor who assists him who puts him to the final test, and these scenes are the most interesting and important in the film. James Mason as the doctor has no other choice than to be consistent with his own argument and conclude his own case after having received an understated sentence by his elderly colleague. It’s a remarkable film, not for its direction, which could have been better, but for its very thought-provoking story with the presentation of a case which not even doctors could in any possible way be called upon to give a fair judgement of. The tragedy of this case is that James Mason, one of the best actors ever, a constantly brooding romantic hero, more Hamletian than Byronic, has no other choice, which probably no one could reasonably disagree with.”

9/10 IMDB Review by clanciai from Sweden


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I MET A MURDERER
Dir. Roy Kellino, 1939.
UK. 63 minutes.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 – 7:30PM
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 – 5:00PM
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 – 7:30PM

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“If you are a true James Mason fan (as I am) here’s a lovely film. I Met a Murderer (England) was literally an original home movie production released in 1937 when Mason was yet under 30 years old (27-28).

“This curious and personal little movie was conceived and created by Pamela and Roy Kellino along with James Mason. It was not released in Great Britain immediately, having been rejected by Pamela’s family who controlled a large segment of the film distribution business in England. (This caused a painful schism between Pamela and James and the Osterer family.) Only costing 5000 pounds to make, the cinemagraphic production values are honest yet nearly amateur quality. Most of the actors in the film were their friends and performed for nothing or small favors. The story, written by Pamela, is simple and straightforward with lots of naive, old fashioned character interactions and impulsive, hot-tempered, reflexive responses to the problems of the day (like murdering your nagging wife because she shoots the dog-what a concept!). James Mason is exquisitely handsome, and there are lots of dreamy close-ups designed to propel this young superstar into the desiring hearts of swooning bobby-soxers and young moviegoers. His smooth, commanding voice (James Masons’ life long signature) is as potent at 28 years of age as it was throughout his life. James Mason and Pamela Kellino were, at this time, very personal and intimately close friends. Three years later Pamela would become Mrs. Mason and the rest is history.

“I can’t say this is a great movie, but it is an early short feature that shows the fiery intensity of a young James. His willful intensity portrayed here would characterize his appeal for much of his acting career. Indeed, he was the consummate screen actor, perfecting his trade tirelessly until the day of his death. The only complaint I have regarding this little gem is that the sound score is the silent film “follow-the-action-style” musical accompaniment with lots of rousing piano and jump-out-of-your-chair giddyup that can be annoying to modern listeners. Get a copy of this film if you can and enjoy the roots of one of the world’s finest actors.”

7/10 IMDB Review by Clement Concodora from Fort Meyers, FL

LA MANSION DE LA LOCURA (THE MANSION OF MADNESS)

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LA MANSION DE LA LOCURA (THE MANSION OF MADNESS)
Dir. Juan López Moctezuma
Mexico, 99 min.
In English

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15 – 5PM
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21 – 10PM
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26 – 10PM  
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“Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.”

Based on Poe’s story The System Of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether, in which a reporter visits an asylum to discover the system by which the roles of the insane and the caregivers have become a bit muddled, we enter into a film where political satire and surrealist horror blend into a truly astonishing mixture, a place out of time where a man becomes a chicken, the body becomes a musical instrument, and nothing is ever as it seems. Director Juan Lopez Moctezuma (ALUCARDA, MARY MARY BLOODY MARY) was a member of Mexico’s Panic movement alongside Alejandro Jodorowski and Fernando Arrabal: the three worked together on FANDO Y LIS, which should give you some idea of what you’re in for. With a cast led by the great Claudio Brook (CRONOS, THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL) in a dual role as the mad Dr. Maillard as well as Raoul Fragonard, the film is as a dream, a ritual, a series of living tableaux. Describing the plot would be to cheapen the film, but it’s worth noting no less than Leonora Carrington served as art director. We are honored to present this film in its longest known cut, with the original English dialogue, miles from public domain cuts. Those expecting cheap horror will be disappointed; those expecting clarity will be confused, those with eyes to see will behold a revelation.


SUCCUBUS

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SUCCUBUS
Dir. Cosmotropia de Xam, 2016
Italy/Germany. 68 mins.

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 15 – 7:30PM

GET YOUR TICKETS HERE

From the mastermind behind witchhaus icons Mater SUSPIRIA VISION, DRUG MACHINE and PHANTASMADISQUES comes the latest surreal multi layer narration mindfuck art horror film by Cosmotropia de Xam.  The Dream as a sin? A Dream that has been stolen and is being controlled? A bizarre trip between dream and reality. Welcome to the Witch House of Gretel F.
New York Premiere!

Bad2Worse

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2016 has been a horrible year.  In just nine months, we’ve seen the loss of multiple cultural icons, the apparent erosion of the American political system, bigotry-fueled killings at the hands of police and madmen, while the destructive power of capitalism thunders on unabated and the environment rains down ecological disaster on a world that still refuses to acknowledge its own role in climate change.  As bad as things are, we at Spectacle Theater would like to remind you, dear moviegoers, that things can always get worse, and probably will.  In that spirit we have selected three films highlighting the failures of humanity to prepare itself for the inevitable downward spiral.  In Bad2Worse, witness the bleak inevitability of downfall at the hands of drug addition and false hope (in Born to Win), literal false imprisonment and the rational belief that being right will save you (The Fifth Floor) and the randomness of violence in a world without boundaries (Caged Terror).  Watch, enjoy, and remember, this WILL be YOU someday.


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BORN TO WIN
Dir. Ivan Passer, 1971.
USA. 85 minutes.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 – 10:00PM
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 – 10:00PM
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 – 7:30PM
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 – 7:30PM

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“They say I’m a charmer… that I charm the people I hustle. Well, that comes after dealing with women, after hairdressing. I love to dress hair! But being that I know what to do, being that I’m hip enough to know, I do it!”  George Segal plays J, a down-on-his-luck-beyond-down-on-his-luck hairdresser, scam artist and junkie in this grim portrait of NYC in the early 70s, co-starring Robert DeNiro, Paula Prentiss, Hector Elizondo and the late, great Karen Black, from the director of the equally bleak Cutter’s Way.


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THE FIFTH FLOOR
Dir. Howard Avedis, 1978.
USA. 90 minutes.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 – 5:00PM
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 – 10:00PM
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 – 10:00PM
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 – 7:30PM

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She was just looking for a night out on the town, but after collapsing on the dancefloor of a disco with strychnine poisoning, a young woman is committed to a mental institution for suicide watch. Like Sam Fuller’s “Shock Corridor,” “The Fifth Floor” begs the question, can sanity survive in a sea of insanity? Co-starring b-movie stalwarts Bo Hopkins, Robert Englund, Sharon Farrell, Julie Adams, Mel Ferrer, Earl Boen and Patti D’Arbanville. From the director of Mortuary and They’re Playing With Fire.


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CAGED TERROR
aka GOLDEN APPLES OF THE SUN
Dir. Barrie McLean and Kristen Weingartner, 1973.
Canada. 96 minutes.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 – 10:00PM
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 – 5:00PM
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 – 7:30PM

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A young couple (or rather, a manipulative yuppie who convinces a young woman to go camping with him) is pushed to their physical and psychological limits when their vacation is interrupted by a sadistic cult. The man is caged, the woman is tormented. Things end badly.