MANGOSHAKE


MANGOSHAKE
dir. Terry Chiu, 2015
104 mins. Canada.
In English.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, JUNE 9 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, JUNE 14 – 10 PM
MONDAY, JUNE 17 -7:30 PM
SATURDAY, JUNE 22 – 7:30 PM

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Bummer in the summer! What happens with a pack of listless teens stop being polite, and start getting real serious about making money with their competing DIY fruit drink stands?

A special treat from our neighbors to the north, Terry Chiu’s coming-of-age send-up left audiences in stitches from Austin to Buenos Aires. Scrappy, honest, but hardly saccharine, Chiu’s improvisatory style and keen eye for interpersonal pettiness goes toe-to-toe with the more polished debuts of his better-heeled colleagues. See the film birth.movies.death called “the heart inside the roughest cinematic outsider art,” when MANGOSHAKE lands at Brooklyn’s outsiders-only cinema.

MATCH CUTS PRESENTS: HANGIN’ WITH LEO!


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19th – 7:30 PM

ONE NIGHT ONLY!

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HANGIN’ WITH LEO!
prod. Doug Waterman, 1998.
32 mins. United States.
In English.

Hangin’ With Leo!! – Leonardo DiCaprio: The Unauthorized Documentary VHS

MATCH CUTS is a weekly podcast centered on video, film and the moving image. Match Cuts Presents is dedicated to presenting de-colonialized cinema, LGBTQI films, Marxist diatribes, video art, dance films, sex films, and activist documentaries with a rotating cast of presenters from all spectrums of the performing and plastic arts and surrounding humanities. Match Cuts is hosted by Nick Faust and Kachine Moore.

REYNOLS “SINTI BOTUVA TAPES”

SUNDAY, JUNE 16 – 7:30 PM
ONE NIGHT ONLY!
Acourtis from Reynols in person for Q&A! (This event is $10.)

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REYNOLS “SINTI BOTUVA TAPES”
dir. Various, 2018.
Various, 81 min.

Screening to celebrate the release of the boxset REYNOLS “MINECXIO EMANATIONS 1993-2018” on Picadisk.

“SINTI BOTUVA TAPES” compiles videos of Argentine cult band REYNOLS. The band started in Buenos Aires in 1993 and it integrates Down Syndrome drummer Miguel Tomasín along with guitarists Roberto Conlazo and Alan Courtis, The film shows a diversity of live concerts and various activities over a period more than 25 years.

The film includes:

1. Saludo Vincher Vinchas (Dir. Miguel Mitlag)
2. Colegio Cristoforo Colombo, 1994 (Dir. A.Ruiz and unknown)
3. No Music Festival, The Tonic, New York 2001 (Dir. Mike Shiflet)
4. Flesh Sound Bs. As.,1999 (Reynols selected archives)
5. Somewhere near Kingston, New York, 2001 (Dir. Mike Shiflet)
6. Papagayos en la luz, Flesh Sound, Bs.As., 2001 (Reynols selected archives)
7. O’Hara Mansion, Ohio, 2001 (Dir. Reynols)
8. Fusa, Bs.As., 2001 (Reynols selected archives)
9. Lo Pawe Recy Plays Norway (Dir. Tom Løberg)
10. Camio Flatdas (Dir. Reynols)
11. Lor Nindio Pepelacho in Brussels (Dir. Christophe Piette)

THE PROSTITUTES OF LYON SPEAK


THE PROSTITUTES OF LYON SPEAK
(LES PROSTITUEES DE LYON PARLENT)
dir. Carole Roussopoulos, 1975
46 minutes. France.
In French with English subtitles.

SUNDAY, JUNE 2 – 7:30 PM
ONE NIGHT ONLY!
(This event is $10.)

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The state is a pimp. The greatest one!

In 1975, escalating tensions between the local government and sex workers in Lyon, France came to a head. Following a scandal linking the vice squad with area brothels, the police made a show of cracking down on sex workers, dramatically increasing fines for soliciting, and retroactively retrieving an old law which condemned repeat offenders to prison. Dozens of women suddenly faced jail time and the loss of custody of their children.

Pushed to the edge, on June 2nd, about a hundred women took over the church of St. Nizier in the center of Lyon. They set up a dormitory inside the church, as well as a monitor on the street outside to broadcast their message to onlookers and passersby. Their protest action itself was short lived, but it captured national attention, and sparked a wave of similar church occupations throughout France. Today it is commonly regarded as the birth of the modern sex workers rights movement.

Pioneering feminist documentary filmmaker Carole Roussopoulos visited St. Nizier during the occupation to speak with activists about their lives, their work, and the repression they faced as sex workers. She recorded these interviews with the utmost simplicity, forgoing artifice to bear witness to their stories. In this vital document, she invites us to do the same.

This program is part of SEX WORK IS WORK, an ongoing benefit series exploring sex work in film, programmed in protest of the SESTA/FOSTA law. All proceeds from this event will go to Lysistrata Mutual Care Collective and Fund.

Poster by Henri de Corinth 

GOLDSTEIN


GOLDSTEIN

dirs. Philip Kaufman and Benjamin Manaster, 1964
85 mins. United States.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, JUNE 9 – 5 PM
SATURDAY, JUNE 15 – MIDNIGHT
MONDAY, JUNE 17 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, JUNE 23 – 5 PM
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 – 7:30 PM

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A curious document of mid-’60s low-budget filmmaking, GOLDSTEIN is the directorial debut of Philip Kaufman (THE RIGHT STUFF, INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS remake, and co-creator of Indiana Jones, etc). Initially conceived as a novel inspired by Martin Buber and Yiddish folklore, Kaufman was urged by Anais Nïn to turn it into a mystical screwball film. Enlisting many of the major players of the Second City Troupe (Del Close, Viola Spolin, Severn Darden), plus comedian Jack Burns, author Nelson Algren, and a pre-SHADOWS Ben Carruthers (did you know his son was the original drummer of Megadeth?), it’s a free-wheeling parade of mid-century improvisational acting and a tour of ’60s Chicago. Most impressively, the film was photographed by Aldofas Mekas, whose ingenuous camera-sense shows with some very adhoc tracking shots and creative use of widescreen. It debuted at Cannes in May 1964, where it was lauded by the likes of Jean Renoir and Francois Truffaut and took home the Prix de Nouvelle Critique — though viewers expecting magisterial arthouse should look elsewhere, because GOLDSTEIN is pure American scrap.

SHEILA AND THE BRAINSTEM


SHEILA AND THE BRAINSTEM

dir. Matt McDowell and Russell Bates, 1989
79 min. United States.

THURSDAY, JUNE 6 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, JUNE 10 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, JUNE 20 – 7: 30 PM
SATURDAY, JUNE 22 – MIDNIGHT
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 – 10PM

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Taz, a desert mystic devoted to a lifestyle of non-stop consumption and convenience, travels the countryside in search of a magic brainstem that grants its owner access to a paradise at the center of the Earth. Unfortunately for Taz, three no-good, beverage-obsessed, anti-corporate punks named Sean, Head, and Billy Dork mistake the arcane object for beef jerky and abscond with it in a minimart robbery.

Meanwhile, newlyweds Bruce and Sheila are taken hostage — Bruce by Taz, and Sheila by the punks — but Sheila escapes and sets out on her own, while Taz befriends Bruce. On the long road to paradise (a portal somewhere in Nebraska, where life is everlasting and all stores are open 24 hours a day), conversations about commodity, convenience, love, life, and death trail behind cars like tail lights in the dark.

Filmed in 1989 for $100,000 in and around Gridley, CA, SHEILA AND THE BRAINSTEM is a road movie, a crash-course in punk philosophy, and a commercial for soft drinks that don’t exist. Also, Red Kross plays a bar band (with Bob Forrest on vocals). An ambitious and rewarding first feature, criminally under-appreciated but deserving of a place on the shelf next to REPO MAN, BORDER RADIO and ALONE IN THE T-SHIRT ZONE.

Ahead of its first-ever physical release, Spectacle is pleased as punch to present this rarity throughout the month of June.

“Expanding a kind of throwaway Robert Altman gag, it’s a pop road film about America as a chain-store complex. Boasting a staunch heroine who extricates her consorts from a maze of tract housing, it droops into the Twilight Zone for a bodysnatcher parable about the conformity of rebellion.” – Dennis Delrogh, L.A. Weekly

Presented by Barbarian Video.

BORN ON THE FOURTH OF JUNE: Tiananmen Square Revisited

BORN ON THE FOURTH OF JUNE commemorates the 30th anniversary of the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests, referred to in mainland China as 六四事件 – the “June 4 incident”. None of these movies adopts an explicitly polemical stance; instead, it’s a necessarily imperfect selection of works shedding light on the botched dreams and secret economies that came after the Cultural Revolution, but before the liberalizations of the 1990s – a process that led, of course, to the present moment’s extravaganza of state-managed turbocapitalism. In the spirit of the infamous “tank man” photograph (iconic to the rest of the world, but scrubbed near-entirely from the Chinese internet), this series takes a look at the cultural context surrounding the 1989 protests (and, implicitly, their bloody suppression) in media res.

BUMMING IN BEIJING
(流浪北京)
dir. Wu Wenguang, 1990
70 minutes.
In Mandarin with English subtitles.

MONDAY, JUNE 3 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, JUNE 11 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, JUNE 27 – 10 PM

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In 1990, Chinese documentaries were almost exclusively stodgy, didactic talking-head affairs broadcast on state-run media. Then came Wu Wenguang’s BUMMING IN BEIJING, kicking off an entire independent documentary scene in the country. Shot directly before and after the Tiananmen Square Massacre on cameras taken from a government TV station, BUMMING IN BEIJING follows five broke bohemians (including future art stars like Zhang Dali, long before they found fame) in grimy late 80s Beijing. Shot in a vérité style that would soon be adopted by a new generation of filmmakers, the movie includes an onscreen mental breakdown, a time-capsule view of the emergence of the country’s avant-garde, and proof that the hippest place in China used to be KFC.

“The prolonged moments of near silence in BUMMING IN BEIJING produce the aesthetic effect of outlasting the remembered roar of government tanks.” – Ernest Larsen, Art In America


( poster by Wendy Cong Zhao )

BLACK SNOW
(本命年)
dir. Xie Fei, 1990
107 mins. China.
In Mandarin with English subtitles.

MONDAY, JUNE 3 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, JUNE 11 – 10 PM
MONDAY, JUNE 24 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, JUNE 28 – 10 PM

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Winner of the Silver Bear at the 1990 Berlinale, Xie Fei’s kitchen-sink drama BLACK SNOW was in production before the June 4 Incident, but reflects the bitterness and unease of the period from first frame to last without need for any explicit political statement or reference. In a smoldering early performance, Chinese superstar Jiang Wen (DEVILS ON THE DOORSTEP, KEEP COOL, ROGUE ONE) stars Li Huiquan, a derelict twentysomething returning home after a three-year term at a labor camp, having been implicated in the murder of a young man who was hanging out with his ex-girlfriend. Surrounded by alcoholic friends from childhood and squabbling adults in his claustrophobic slum, Li falls for a torch singer at his favorite nightclub named Yaqiu (Lin Cheng), and the ensuing struggles – freedom versus the need to make a living, going straight versus turning a profit – are unique to this vision of Beijing as a den of black-market iniquity, while linking seamlessly with the classic themes of film noir. Bleak but exhilarating to behold (largely thanks to Jiang’s tight-lipped leading turn), BLACK SNOW is ultimately about the lack of options for Li’s generation to have an undisturbed inner life, living in close quarters in the aftermath of the Cultural Revolution.

“Li represents a lost generation of young people who rebel against the ideals of their forefathers and the traditions of their country… The tragedy is that they are at a loss where to go or what to believe in. Everyone in China now wants to find a new ideal, a new belief, because the Cultural Revolution destroyed our old beliefs and our old system… We realized, after it was too late, that we had been deceived — we had destroyed our past, our values, our lives, but had created nothing.” – Xie Fei

( poster by Wendy Cong Zhao )


THE SQUARE
(广场)
dirs. Zhang Yuan and Duan Jinchuan, 1994
100 mins. China.
In Mandarin with English subtitles.

TUESDAY, JUNE 4 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, JUNE 10 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, JUNE 18 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, JUNE 21 – 10 PM

SATURDAY, JUNE 29 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, JUNE 30 – 5 PM

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Never before screened in New York City and long-suppressed in China, this documentary by the renowned Sixth Generation filmmaker Zhang Yuan (MAMA, SONS, BEIJING BASTARD) sprang from an innocent-enough idea in the years after the June 4 Incident: Tiananmen Square was a public space, so who was to stop Zhang (with Duan Jinchuan) from filming day-to-day mundanities in the guise of working for state TV? It’s a fascinating (and sometimes, dryly funny) glimpse at China on the eve of sweeping economic transition, with accoutrements of the Mao era perhaps uncanny present. Largely emptied out in the years after the Incident, this Square is defined by its absences, and the unease of its own legacy.

“Anyone who knows about Chinese history understands that whatever huge historical changes play out, Tiananmen Square is often the stage – for instance, the June Fourth Incident in 1989, Tomb-Sweeping Day in 1976 when crowds came out to mourn Zhou Enlai. In 1966 it was there in the square that Mao Zedong received more than six million Red Guards. If we go back even further, there is the 1949 ceremony to celebrate the founding of the People’s Republic of China and, if we like, we can go back even further to the May Fourth Movement and beyond. On one level, Tiananmen Square can be said to be a political symbol; at the same time, it is like a massive stage… Especially in the years following the June Fourth Incident, I noticed how quiet it had become. I would see people there flying kites, peddling things, going for strolls, and I would see so many policemen, plainclothes officers… I felt the pressing need to pick up my camera and record some of those more interesting people and attempt to capture that feeling of the square.” – Zhang Yuan


LAN YU
(藍宇)
dir. Stanley Kwan, 2001
96 mins. China/Hong Kong.
In Mandarin with English subtitles.

TUESDAY, JUNE 4 – 10 PM
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, JUNE 16 – 5 PM
THURSDAY, JUNE 20 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, JUNE 23 – 7:30 PM

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Based on a novel first published online by one “Beijing Comrade” in 1998, LAN YU is a breakthrough film, a queer drama set against the backdrop of the student movement that culminated in the Tiananmen Square Massacre. While the book was infamous for its erotic descriptive passages, director Stanley Kwan wanted to expand the source material to focus on the tortured romance between the story’s eponymous architecture student (Liu Ye) and his lover, a closeted businessman of the older generation named Chen Handong (Hu Jun). The result is a film that’s both elliptical and brutally sharp, a diagnosis in the class differences and mores (and thus, denials) that helped foment the dissent of the late eighties – in particular, the corruption of China’s bureaucratic (and, by proximity to government, emerging bourgeois) classes. It’s also an edge-of-your-seat portrayal of desire and devastation through Lan Yu’s fast-eroding innocence, with a plot spanning multiple years of unrequited passion.

Widely heralded as one of the greatest living Hong Kong filmmakers for works like CENTER STAGE and ROUGE, Stanley Kwan has still never gotten a proper retrospective in North America; hopefully these screenings will help renew interest in his fascinating and singular body of work. “In my last film THE ISLAND TALES, I made simple things too complicated, “he said. “And so this time I’ve tried to make complicated things less complicated, or simple things even simpler… What I was interested in was how we could transform June 4 into the moment that Chen Handong commits to Lan Yu… The fact that the story took place in Beijing, a city foreign to me, didn’t bother me…. I might not be Lan Yu and my boyfriend might not be Chen Handong, but virtually everything they go through in the novel I’ve been through with my partner.”

“Courageously simple and frank… The film eliminates most of the novel’s near-porno sex scenes and tones down the melodrama, producing a matter of fact and emotionally truthful account of a relationship marked by its time and place. Superbly acted, too.” – Time Out London

“Pulpy and mesmerizing.” – Carla Meyer, San Francisco Chronicle

KINET MEDIA PRESENTS: Three Films By Miguel Mantecon

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 – 7:30 PM – ONE NIGHT ONLY
Filmmaker in person!

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As digital technologies continue to reshape the ways in which we produce and relate to images, cinema finds itself in a media landscape given over to near-constant metamorphosis. A new generation of filmmakers have begun to create works contemplative of cinema’s updated conditions. In 2016, Kinet was formed in order to provide a home for this cinema.

This program provides a focus on Kinet filmmaker Miguel Mantecon and his trilogy of three films – a near singular cinematic object which hovers through the limbus between diaristic image-making, landscape filmmaking, and textural play to find the phantoms of history and memory. Each a perfectly arranged cascade of irreducible images, these three films catch and ensnare pure experiences of love, death, and familial communion, yet at the same time remain boundless in their pursuit by rejecting the barriers of meaning.

Mantecon’s artistic project has not yet been reckoned with by film festivals; this screening marks the theatrical premiere of these landmark works in digital filmmaking.

GOODBYE PHILIPPINES
2016. United States/Philippines.
25 min.

TODO Y TODO
2017. United States.
11 min.

MadManWedding_remix
2018. United States.
6 min.

Kinet is a virtual studio dedicated to the production and dissemination of new, boundary pushing avant-garde cinema.

AN EVENING WITH MICHAEL GLOVER SMITH

In keeping with recent events with independent filmmakers currently forging their own paths – Nuotama Bodomo, Ricky D’Ambrose, Lev Kalman & Whitney Horn, Amir George – Spectacle is pleased to invite Chicago-based film critic and director Michael Glover Smith to our humble theater to present the New York City premiere of two recent works: MERCURY IN RETROGRADE (2017) and RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO (2018). Just in time for your most recent imploded relationship, Smith’s films draw unabashedly from the influence of Eric Rohmer, alongside classic walk-and-talk romantic comedies of the eighties and nineties. Already it’s a signature body of work, alternately warm and humanist but without Hollywood allusions about the pitfalls of complicated people trying to forge a life together in the Windy City (or, for that matter, anywhere else.)

MERCURY IN RETROGRADE
dir. Michael Glover Smith, 2017
105 mins. United States.

SATURDAY, MAY 25 – 5 PM with Q&A featuring Michael Glover Smith, producer Kevin Wright and actor Shane Simmons
ONE NIGHT ONLY! (This event is $10.)

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MERCURY IN RETROGRADE follows three couples who spend a weekend together on Lake Michigan: Jack (Jack C. Newell) and Golda (Alana Arenas) have been married for a decade, Richard (Kevin Wehby) and Isabelle (Roxane Mesquida) are in a committed love relationship but clearly on (or near) the rocks, and Peggy (Najarra Townsend) and Wyatt (Shane Simmons, who will reprise the character in Smith’s followup RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO) just linked up. Embracing the intrinsic anxiety of its classic setup, Smith’s film is a handcrafted trip into the terra incognita of monogamy, epitomized by a jarring sequence of dudes being old-fashioned dudes back at the cabin while (because) their partners have repaired to the local watering hole. MERCURY IN RETROGRADE is that rare slice-of-life film with a grip on the darkness below its surface, driven forward by its flawed characters’ alternating fears of being committed or alone (no spoilers!) and anchored by six committed performances from a pitch-perfect cast.

RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO
dir. Michael Glover Smith, 2018
69 mins. United States.

SATURDAY, MAY 25 – 7:30 PM with Q&A featuring Michael Glover Smith, with actors Claire Cooney and Rashaad Hall
ONE NIGHT ONLY! (This event is $10.)

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RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO is separated into three discrete vignettes: the first concerns a young man named Paul (Kevin Wehby) angling to woo a grad student named Delaney (Clare Cooney) he meets in a bar. Paul’s innocuous-enough pickup attempt sets the stage for a bittersweet and frequently hilarious rumination on compatibility in short-and-long-terms, perfectly matched by the subsequent passages. Part II follows a couple (Rashaad Hall and Matthew Sherbach) weighing whether to get a cat or a dog, while one half privately considers popping The Question. Perhaps inevitably, Part III addresses breakup, in the form of a 20something schlub named Wyatt (Shane Simmons) whose girlfriend Julie (Nina Garnet) happens upon him in bed with another woman. The overall portrait of dating life – with all its agonies, ecstasies and nauseating in-betweens – is drawn with a delicate touch and a knack for sparkling dialogue.

MICHAEL GLOVER SMITH‘s debut feature COOL APOCALYPSE (2015) won multiple awards at festivals across the U.S. and screened at Chicago’s Gene Siskel Film Center and Movies in the Park before being released on home video by Emphasis Entertainment. His second feature, MERCURY IN RETROGRADE, starring Roxane Mesquida and Najarra Townsend, won the top prizes at the 2018 Tallahassee Film Festival and the 2017 Full Bloom Film Festival and was the subject of a rave review by the Chicago Sun-Times’ Richard Roeper who wrote: “Smith has a deft touch for dialogue, creating six distinct characters who look and sound like people we know…a smart, funny, quietly effective and authentic slice of older millennial life.” His most recent feature, 2018’s RENDEZVOUS IN CHICAGO, is the final installment in his “relationship trilogy” and has won four awards in its first 10 festival screenings. He was a recipient of the Siskel Center’s Star Filmmaker award in 2017 and made Newcity Chicago’s “Film 50” list in 2018. He teaches film history at several Chicago-area colleges and is the author of the film blog Whitecitycinema.com.

CONTORTING METAPHYSICAL HIJINKS: An Evening With Amir George

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 – 8 PM 
ONE NIGHT ONLY!

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Spectacle is thrilled to host Chicago-based multidisciplinary artist and “film alchemist” Amir George for an evolving program of works he likes to call CONTORTING METAPHYSICAL HIJINKS.

Like George’s own short film OPTIMUM CONTINUUM, the evening promises “an ongoing barrage of Blackness always in progress”; George’s work draws from a wide berth of inspiration, including archival material from the Chicago Film Archive (who have also commissioned “meditations” from George), psychedelic soul and funk, the defiantly idiosyncratic films of Sankofa Collective and the “LA Rebellion” and beyond. Even while acknowledging full stop that there’s nothing wrong with “pretty pictures”, George uses cinema to tackle the fetishization of memory and interrogate his own nostalgia towards certain types of images, fragmenting narrative to explore desire and ecstasy beyond the typical tried-and-trues of Black suffering endemic to so much 20th century visual media. Here’s a taste of what the program will include:

DECADENT ASYLUM
2017. 17 mins.

George describes DECADENT ASYLUM as a journey to a higher realm of consciousness, an “experimental fairy tale” in eight parts. A mundane doorman is transported through a broken door that leads him to metaphysical dimensions where he his put through practices of self-alchemy.

THE ENCOMPASSED WISDOM OF THE INEVITABLE MANIFESTATION
2017. 2 mins.

A spell-casting of images, guided by a voice in the light – recollections from Black Jesus.

BLACK CHAINS
2017. 4 mins.

A meditation on how oppression exacerbates interpersonal relations and mental health, connecting chain link fences, colorful street murals, black and white neighborhood defense footage from Chicago communities.

PASSAGES OF EXCESS
2017. 15 mins.

Ethereal movement and its relation to the physical world. Mundane gestures, ideas and images generated over time.

MUM
2016. 3 MINS.

A commissioned project for writer Julie Carr. MUM delves into the psyche and violence of motherhood.

MOMENTS OF INTENTION
2016. 8 mins.

The movement is the voice in the mirror. MOMENTS OF INTENTION is a vibration migrating from winter, spirits working in tandem as a force of creativity.

SHADES OF SHADOWS
2015. 6 mins.

Commissioned by Chicago Film Archives, this film is a collaboration with psychedelic soul band The O’Mys that delves into spiritual mysticism and ritual sacrifice. Created with all-archival footage, the characters in SHADES OF SHADOWS seek to manifest a better self.

AMIR GEORGE is a filmmaker and curator, based in Chicago. ​George is the founder of The Cinema Culture, a grassroots film programming organization, and co-founder, with Curator Erin Christovale, of Black Radical Imagination, a touring experimental short film series. As an artist, George’s films have screened at institutions and film festivals including Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, Anthology Film Archives, Glasgow School of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Arts Los Angeles, Museum of Contemporary Arts Chicago, MoMa PS1, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Trinidad and Tobago International Film Festival, BlackStar Film Festival, Afrikana Film Festival, and Chicago Underground Film Festival, among others.