MATCH CUTS PRESENTS: TIM BLAKE NELSON’S O


O
dir. Tim Blake Nelson, 2001.
USA, 95 min.
English.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19th
ONE NIGHT ONLY – 7:30 PM
INTRODUCED BY LINDSAY ZOLADZ (THE RINGER)

ONLINE TIX
FB EVENT

Moving the classic tale of “Othello” onto the basketball courts of a high school, the story focuses on a young black man named Odin (Mekhi Phifer) who is convinced by a conniving best friend, Hugo (Josh Hartnett) that his girlfriend (Julia Stiles) is cheating on him. Of course, what Odin doesn’t know is that Hugo is in fact motivated by his own jealousy of Odin’s good fortune. It’s a sticky situation in classic Shakespearean tradition.

*Text courtesy of Wikipedia*

MATCH CUTS is a weekly podcast centered on video, film and the moving image. Match Cuts Presents is dedicated to presenting de-colonialized cinema, LGBTQI films, Marxist diatribes, video art, dance films, sex films, and activist documentaries with a rotating cast of presenters from all spectrums of the performing and plastic arts and surrounding humanities. Match Cuts is hosted by Nick Faust and Kachine Moore.

DAS IST KUNST: 16MM EXPERIMENTAL SHORTS


DAS IST KUNST: 16MM EXPERIMENTAL SHORTS
dir. Various, 2018
Approx. 50 min

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 28 – 7:30 PM & 10 PM
ONE NIGHT ONLY! FILMMAKER IN ATTENDANCE! Q&A!
(Tickets for this event are $10)

DAS IST KUNST – on 16mm!
dir. Julie Orlick, 2018
Berlin / NYC

TRAUER NATUR – on 16mm!
dir. Julie Orlick, 2018
Berlin / NYC

DISCHARGE WORKING II
dir. Johnny Welch, 2018
Berlin

ONLINE TIX
FB EVENT

Dim and dusty short works by deranging visual artists hailing from Brookyln, Berlin, Mexico City, Oakland, and Los Angeles; all in the game of deviously manipulating precious 16mm film. With brand new releases featuring slick & savvy in-camera 16mm Bolex tricks, nail-polish splotched emulsion, decaying film chemical experiments from six-feet under, and more, all returning to the spinning spool to haunt your digitally drained eyelids.

COFFIN JOE AND OTHER COFFINS


AWAKENING OF THE BEAST
Dir. José Mojica Marins, 92 mins.
Brazil, 1969

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20 – 7:30 PM
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22 – 10 PM

ONLINE TIX

Perhaps Awakening of the Beast is considered Marin’s greatest film by many of his admirer’s because it is the first film made after the establishment of Zé do Caixão’s iconography in the Brazilian cultural lexicon. This familiarity allowed Marins to modulate Ze’s role in the horror films featuring the character starting with and following this film, accentuating the paranormal, dreamlike quality that was achieved once Zé became the demonic puppetmaster lurking in the subconscious, rather than the focus of the narrative, constantly seeking to assert his dominance.

Indeed, we do see constant reference to and manipulation of Marins’ image throughout Awakening of the Beast, as his visage appears both on TV as himself, and as Zé do Caixão across various media including comic books and a hallucinogenic-trip-inducing poster. This newfound recognition of the potential held for the proliferation of Zé’s image through contemporary mass media lead Marins to probe the countercultural issues of his day in Brazil, resulting in Awakening’s focus on recreational drug use, (Sadistic) sexual liberation, and the political repression carried out by the second, more severe military “coup within the coup” in the Brazilian government that occurred 1968.

Truly, Awakening of the Beast remains Marins’ most potent political film, as it juxtaposes its scenes of violent repression enacted by the dictatorship upon “subversives” against a panel of condescending psychiatric figures, rejecting both physical and institutional forms of coercive despotism. Featuring both a hellacious color sequence that rivals that of This Night I’ll Possess Your Corpse, and other figures from the “udigrudi” Brazilian cinematic movement (such as Ozualdo Candeias, Carlos Reichenbach, and Jairo Ferreira), the third film in the Coffin Joe saga remains a Brazilian countercultural milestone that deserves to be regarded as such.



THIS NIGHT I’LL POSSESS YOUR CORPSE
Dir. José Mojica Marins, 1967
Brazil, 109 mins.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6 – 10 PM
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21 – 7:30 PM

An unsuspecting viewer need only watch the opening credits of THIS NIGHT I’LL POSSESS YOUR CORPSE to understand the tenor of what they are stepping into, if not the scope. The second installment in José Mojica Marins’ instantly iconic saga chronicling of the tribulations of Zé do Caixâo (known as Coffin Joe to his international audience) begins with a concise introductory sequence that covers both the catch-up from the first film and the exposition for the current one, thrust forward by the narrative’s need to reach the point where Zé resumes his quest to secure the object of his obsession: a heir to his bloodline.

Working in no less an allegorical mode than its Cinema Novo contemporaries (though Marins certainly aligned more closely with the udigrudi movement), Zé’s frenzied reign of terror resemble the repressive tactics of Brazil’s military regime—already three years underway by the time of THIS NIGHT’s release—in no small significance. Ze’s actions are nothing less than evil, both in its ideal form and its politically violent manifestations, and actions such as diving in front of an out-of-control motorcycle to save a child’s life are always underpinned by the sour deliverance of conservative diatribe extolling the superiority of those who secure their lineage. Murder and torture abound, driven solely by Zé’s mania. These neofascist ideals represented by the figure of Zé do Caixâo invite a critical view to the work that historically place and render its subversive values active in the radical Brazilian discourse of the 1960s and 70s.

No less a constructing factor in the analysis implied here is the underdeveloped modes of production and technical quality that is characteristic of the Brazilian underground, signaled here by many elements—not the least of which is the fact that in the negative of the film remain copious evidence of tape splicing accompanying the edits, an almost subliminal reminder of the conditions under which Marins was working. And yet, it is clear that in the small span of time between AT MIDNIGHT I’LL TAKE YOUR SOUL and THIS NIGHT I’LL POSSESS YOUR CORPSE, Marins progressed an incalculable amount in technical skill, as well as popularity, one of the elements which allowed the freer sense of experimentation in the latter film, epitomized by its mesmerizing representation of Hell, rendered in phantasmagoric color.

Content advisory – This film contains scenes of traumatic violence committed against women. While we believe these acts are dramatized with a critical perspective, we realize the adverse affect seeing such imagery potentially has on viewers.


PREVIOUSLY SCREENED, AS PART OF SPECTOBER

AT MIDNIGHT I’LL TAKE YOUR SOUL
(A MEIA-NOITE LEVAREI SUA ALMA)

Dir. José Mojica Marins, 1964
Brazil. 84 minutes.
In Brazilian Portuguese with English subtitles.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, OCTOBER 15 – 10:00 PM
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26 – 10:00 PM

“What is Life? It is the Beginning of Death. What is Death? It is the end of life. What is existence? It is the continuity of blood. What is blood? It is the reason to exist!” So ushers in both the twin obsessions of death and progeny in the cinema of Zé do Caixão, and the first incarnation of Brazilian horror cinema. José Mojica Marins entered into the iconographic canon a figure who is both constructed of pieces from other famous monsters and a wholly original, idiosyncratic, definitively Brazilian figure who has yet to be duplicated (possessing the most disgusting nails you’re likely to come across).

With Marins’ third film, AT MIDNIGHT I’LL TAKE YOUR SOUL, we are immediately familiarized with a fully-formed icon: the dreaded Zé do Caixão, whose reign of terror over the small mountain town in which he resides carries with it the certainty that the man is aided by the unnameable forces of evil.Operating on Nietzchean levels of religious irreverence and self-preservation, Zé’s main concern is the securement of an heir, an end in which the fury of his conviction knows no bounds. Cruel sadism defines his interactions with nearly person he comes across, acts aided by his diverse repertoire of violent methods, including his sheer strength, fueled by disdain (more often than not in misogynistic iterations), tarantulas and other creepy crawlies, and the manipulation of fear on display in all of Zé do Caixão’s appearances.While nothing in the diegesis explicitly reveals Zé’s powers to be sourced in the devil, the dark surrealism of Marins’ mise-en-scene never allows the film to leave the precarious position it holds on the edge of the supernatural.

Read over the years as an allegory for Brazilian military repression, a queer text, an epitome of paracinema, and countless other fields of discourse, AT MIDNIGHT I’LL TAKE YOUR SOUL undoubtedly kicks off one of cinema’s most singular visions of an extended universe, held together by the essentially DIY ethic and “dirty screen” aesthetic that defines much of the Brazilian underground, a movement for which Spectacle holds nothing but whole-hearted admiration.

Content advisory – This film contains scenes of traumatic violence committed against women. While we believe these acts are dramatized with a critical perspective, we realize the adverse affect seeing such imagery potentially has on viewers.

TIE YOUR PLOUGH TO A STAR

TIE YOUR PLOUGH TO A STAR
(ATA TU ARADO A UNA ESTRELLA)
Dir. Carmen Guarini, 2017
Argentina. 82 minutes.
In Spanish with English subtitles.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13 – 10 PM
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25 – 5 PM

“I’m a phantasmagoria. You people are inventing me, I barely exist anymore. I haven’t existed for the last five years. I live because of false projections. I’m very glad that you think I’m with you people. When you leave here, I act like I go to my room. I close the door and disappear. I reappear when Carmen knocks on the door and I reconstruct myself.”

After some time off, we decided to put a cherry on top of our near-complete Fernando Birri retrospective (COSMIC, RAVING, LUMPEN CINEMA) with this documentary by Carmen Guarini, who shot Birri’s return to Argentina (as well as the Higuera commune in Bolivia) in 1997, to mark the 30th anniversary of Che Guevara’s murder. TIE YOUR PLOUGH TO A STAR is structured around that visitation which, necessarily, uncorks many juicy anecdotes about the turbulent 60s and 70s heyday of Third Cinema, alongside invaluable glimpses of Birri’s practice as a thinker (utterly unafraid of then-burgeoning digital technology) and his eternal quest for answers to one nagging question: What is utopia? Guarini stitches it together with a wide-ranging interview conducted with Birri two decades later, just before his death in December 2017. The result is a loving portrait of a restless mind and a titan of Latin American cinema, as well as invaluable testimony to Birri’s influence as an unclassifiable theorist, educator and filmmaker.

CARMEN GUARINI is a veteran filmmaker and anthropologist, as well as the founder of DOCUBUENOSAIRES Festival and Forum (est. 2001) as well as the pioneering Argentine documentary production house CINE OJO (est. 1987), cofounded with Marcelo Céspedes. She teaches at University of Buenos Aires and the University of Cinema (FUC) as well as the EICTV-Cuba. She has participated in seminars with Jorge Preloran, Fernando Birri and Jean-Louis Commoli. Her other films include (but are not limited to) HOSPITAL BORDA, A CALL TO REASON (1986), THE ETERNAL NIGHT (1990), THE VOICE OF THE HANDKERCHIEFS (1992), RED INK (1998), THE DEVIL AMONG THE FLOWERS (2005) and STREETS OF MEMORY (2013).

SHOOT THE WHALE

SHOOT THE WHALE
dir. Philip Makanna
1972, USA
78 minutes

Preceded by a short excerpt from Philip Makanna’s subsequent film WITH ENOUGH BANANAS.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16 – MIDNIGHT
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18 – 5 PM
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26 – 7:30 PM

Special thanks to Unseen Worlds.

SHOOT THE WHALE will be preceded by a short excerpt from Philip Makanna’s subsequent film WITH ENOUGH BANANAS.

*****

UNDER THIS SKY
THERE IS NO BEGINNING NO MIDDLE NO END

UNDER THIS SKY
EVERYTHING HAPPENS AT ONCE

THESE EVENTS
ARE FRAGMENTS OF A TRUE STORY

CAREFULLY CHOSEN
AND PRESENTED EXACTLY AS THEY HAPPENED

*****

Filmed in 1970 in Death Valley, Mono Lake, Hoover Dam and a local Greek temple, then edited in a glorious year at Francis Coppola’s American Zoetrope Studios, SHOOT THE WHALE follows a madcap troupe of revolutionary philosophers through an endless American purgatory. Dubbed by the filmmaker as “the one and only WWII Cowboy Circus Electronic Musical Comedy,” it is desert-gonzo street theater.

Philip Makanna came to filmmaking through painting and sculpture, teaching a spectacularly early course of fine arts video (says Makanna “we called it television”) in the late ’60s at the California College of Arts and Crafts in Oakland. He was commissioned by Jim Newman of the Dilexi Foundation to make his first foray into broadcast television, The Empire of Things for KQED, described by Gene Youngblood as an “Expressionist painting of green shadows and purple highlights quivering in a liquid mosaic of hues.”

In SHOOT THE WHALE, Makanna continues to experiment with video manipulations, interspersing the improvised action with expressionistic circus performance.

The film enlists an intriguing array of Bay Area counter-culture fixtures. Performing duties are assumed by the East Bay Sharks, a street theater troupe that included Darryl Henriques (later of JUMANJI and STAR TREK VI). The score was composed by Robert Ashley and “Blue” Gene Tyranny at the Center for Contemporary Music at Mills College. Jim Newman, its producer, followed SHOOT THE WHALE with Sun Ra’s SPACE IS THE PLACE soon after.

Though the film was screened at Cannes and enjoyed some rabble-rousing midnight screenings around the Bay Area, it has gone largely unseen until the recent re-discovery of its masters – lost for 30 years and rescued by the Prelinger Archive.

This screening marks the NYC debut of its restoration.

TERROR


TERROR
dir. Norman J Warren
UK, 1978

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17 – MIDNIGHT
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30 – MIDNIGHT

Family can really be a drag.

Norman’s bloodline is supposedly cursed by witches from 300 years ago, and he’s just made a horror film about it. After a wrap party at their primary location (which also happens to be Norman’s family home where the legend of the curse began), crew members start dying one by one – are the stories true, or is Norman losing his mind?

An unabashed riff on Suspiria, Norman and crew clearly had a blast playing with light, color, and not giving a damn about the barebones plot. With the release of Suspiria-reimagined this month, we thought it would be the perfect opportunity to air this less-known but (almost) equally entertaining sibling from across the pond.

ANGORA RISING: TWO FROM ED WOOD



GLEN OR GLENDA
dir. Edward D. Wood Jr, 1953
USA, 61 min.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2 – MIDNIGHT
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8 – 7:30 PM
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23 – 10 PM

“In the making of this film, which deals with a strange and curious subject, no punches have been pulled– no easy way out has been taken. Many of the smaller parts are portrayed by persons who actually are, in real life, the character they portray on the screen. This is a picture of stark realism– taking no sides — but giving you the facts — ALL the facts — as they are today… YOU ARE SOCIETY — JUDGE YE NOT…”

Opening with and extended monologue by The Scientist (Bela Lugosi, dead) he “explains” that in humanity’s search for the unknown many startling things come to light. While investigating the suicide of a transvestite, Inspector Warren seeks the help of Dr. Alton who tells him the sordid tale of a man named Glen (Ed Wood). Glen’s wife Barbara (Dolores Fuller, Ed Wood’s real life girlfriend at the time) accuses him of having another woman in his life but little does she know the “other woman” is Glen’s female counterpart – Glenda! Recounted in flashback we see Glen wearing his sisters clothes for Halloween and then never wanting to take them off. Shunned by his family, Glen must keep his desires a secret. Now it’s up to Glen to decide if he should tell his blushing bride-to-be about his double life…

One of 3 films directed by Ed Wood in 1953, GLEN OR GLENDA was shot in just 4 days, propped up by almost 14 minutes of stock footage, and padded out with erotic vignettes by producer George Weiss. The film was initially to be a profile of Christine Jorgensen who had dominated the headlines only a year before. After Jorgensen turned the filmmakers down they decided to go a different route, though many of the films promotional materials still tried to sell it as a profile of Jorgensen. Though no official sequel was ever filmed Glen/Glenda would show up in two of Wood’s novels later on. After film fell into public domain it was released dozens if not hundreds of times garnering quite a reputation along the way. David Lynch is such a fan of this film that he used the “blowing wind” sound effect from it in his film ERASERHEAD!




TAKE IT OUT IN TRADE
dir. Edward D. Wood Jr, 1970
USA, 77 min.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3 – MIDNIGHT
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16 – 7:30 PM

“Ed gave you free reign, he let you do your thing. You showed him what you could do and then you went ahead and did it. Eddie let you improvise a lot. A lot. Because he was not stuck to any one particular concept or idea.”
– Michael Donovan O’Donnell, “Nightmare Of Ecstasy”

A private dick named Mac McGregor (Michael Donovan O’Donnell) is brought in to help Frank and Donna Stanley, a couple search for their missing daughter. The trail leads him to a house of ill-repute. Inside are all manners of perversions and titillating sights to behold…can he keep his nose to the grindstone and bring the girl home?

Thought lost for years TAKE IT OUT IN TRADE was rediscovered by Ed Wood biographer Rudolph Grey while doing research for his book “Nightmare of Ecstasy.” Additionally, in the 1990’s 3 reels of bloopers, behind the scenes footage, and alternate takes were discovered in a theater in Santa Monica, California. Not screened in NYC since Anthology’s massive retrospective in 2014, TAKE IT OUT IN TRADE is finally set for home release by AGFA later this month.

Note: Both of these films contain scenes of sexual violence which may be offensive. Viewer discretion is advised.

MORAL PANIC: DARK NIGHT OF THE SCARECROW + HOUSE OF THE DEAD


This November, as we gear up for the start of the nightmare that is HOLIDAY SEASON, Spectacle is serving up two heaping helpings of MORAL TERROR – films with black and white visions of good and evil, where every transgression is followed by a lesson (usually deadly).

Both of these offerings are made for TV, but that doesn’t lessen the thrills – including haunting scarecrows, nightmare children, and the hobo-ization of a Wall Street scumbag.




DARK NIGHT OF THE SCARECROW
dir. Frank Felitta, 1981
96 min, USA

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9 – MIDNIGHT
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11 – 7:30 PM
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24 – MIDNIGHT
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27 – 10 PM

‘Mar-vel-ous! I was terrified!’ – Vincent Price

Dark Night of the Scarecrow is a made-for-TV horror film about a subject we’ve all become a little too familiar with lately: a gross miscarriage of justice.

When word spreads around town that little Marylee has been killed by gentle giant and local dullard Bubba (Larry Drake – Darkman, Dr. Giggles), five good-ol-boys decide to take ‘justice’ into their own hands by organizing a flash-mob and murdering Bubba in cold blood. Literal moments after the deed is done, word comes over the radio that Marylee is fine – in fact, Bubba saved her.

The murderers are acquitted on the grounds of ‘self-defense’ (lol) but its not long before a scarecrow turns up on the property of the ringleader…

If you like moody, creeping thrillers and a healthy serving of true karmic justice, this one is not to be missed. A true gem of a film.

Screening the blu-ray remaster courtesy of CALIFORNIA PICTURES INC.

Poster by Steph Monohan!




ALIEN ZONE aka THE HOUSE OF THE DEAD
dir. Shannon Miller
1978, USA

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4 – 7:30 PM
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 – MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20 – 10 PM

A rarely seen American anthology that attempted to capture the glory of the Amicus days in the UK, Shannon Miller directs this series of five alternately creepy and hilarious shorts, with a wraparound story centered on an adulterer who’s taxi accidentally drops him off outside of a funeral home.

After asking to use the phone, our adulterer is given a tour of the funeral home’s current residents by the caretaker, who takes him through each demise in great detail, each one addressing a different ‘sin’ of sorts.

Though it doesn’t quite reach the heights of Scarecrow, it is definitely a unique ride, featuring everything from evil trick or treaters to a hidden-camera-serial-killer to a cat-and-mouse game between rival Private Investigators.

MUSCHA’S WEST BERLIN

The early 80s of West Berlin was accessible to David Bowie and Nick Cave, however it remained a secluded scene unto itself, a fallen city shared between the French, the Brits, and the Americans. Much of the architecture was unchanged from the war, and a post-war generation of musicians and artists were able to live cheap, work little, squat housing, and stay out all night. Muscha’s DECODER is a Spectacle favorite making a return appearance, paired for the first time with B MOVIE: LUST AND SOUND IN WEST BERLIN 1979-1989. The latter can be something of a companion piece, featuring a lot of the same faces in a more music-doc format. Muscha was from Dusseldorf, but came to Berlin for many of the same reasons as the English narrator in LUST AND SOUND. For both the Super 8 footage in LUST AND SOUND and the rich color portraits in DECODER, these are must-sees on a bigger screen with a bigger sound.




DECODER
Dir. Muscha, Trini Trimpop, 87 min.
West Germany, 1984

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11 – 5 PM
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23- MIDNIGHT
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26 – 10 PM

This film should be watched stoned, on whatever substance, as both a tribute to William S. Burroughs and to ensure complete and proper absorption. DECODER is a quiet bureaucratic surveillance drama, but then it’s a color-soaked, Benjamin-tinged struggle over information and control. It stars Bill Rice (who you know from Andrew Horn’s DOOMED LOVE), a man impeccably sensitive and equally expressive under vibrant colored lights. There are fast food joints,  great tunes, Genesis P-Orridge, Christiane F, and the true answer to whether music recorded from frogs in distress can incite revolution.

“Information is like a bank – some of us are rich, and some of us are poor. ALL OF US CAN BE RICH.”

New Poster by isabel lezcano




B MOVIE: LUST AND SOUND IN WEST BERLIN
Dir. Jörg A. Hoppe, Klaus Maeck, Heiko Lange, 92 min.
Germany, 2015

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4 – 5 PM
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8 – 10 PM
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25 – 7:30 PM

This film follows Manchester-born and bored Mark Reeder, who is driven by a love for Can and Edgar Froese to West Berlin in the late 70s. As a budding band manager and eventual radio show host on the BBC, he immerses himself in the scene and documents his new love for the wild and vibrant city. He is present for the squatters rights skirmishes and nights out til 7 am at clubs and bars, where bands like Malaria!, Einstürzende Neubauten and Die Toten Hosen come to define new sounds in a limitless world of creative freedom and easy poverty.

This decade was also that of the Super 8, and Reeder dabbles in pornos and arty shorts as well as more conventional documentary filming. The resulting footage is grainy and raw – squatters clashing with police, punk shows in basement squats, and interviews with musicians unconcerned with commercial viability or trying to capture a scene on film. Reeder talks us through his transformation from a Virgin records employee in Manchester to a Berliner band manager, trying to expose the world to music sung in German. West Berlin acts like it doesn’t need Mark Reeder, but as a scene flourishes, dies out and is reborn, it is a favor that an outsider fell in love with it and wanted the world to know.

Poster by Luke Atkinson