STOOP SALE
SATURDAY, MAY 18TH – NOON TIL 6PM

Come get your Spectacle Merch, Posters, and an assortment of wares including but not limited to comic books, DVDs, records, wigs, and trousers. Home-made goods both edible and collectable. Iced coffee!

This year’s stoop sale also includes XFR Collective! If you missed them in March at the Analogue Roadshow, they will be on site at the Stoop Sale digitizing at-risk media (VHS, Mini DV, etc). Note: XFR cannot digitize anything under copyright!

Are you a member and want to sell some things to benefit Spectacle? Email spectacle.rentals@gmail.com.

New York Immigrant Freedom Fund: Nationalité: Immigré

NATIONALITE: IMMIGRE
(NATIONALITY: IMMIGRANT)
Dir. Sidney Sokhona, 1975
France. 70 mins.
In French with English subtitles.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 8 – 7:30 PM + 10PM
ONE NIGHT ONLY
ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE NEW YORK IMMIGRANT FREEDOM FUND

ONLINE TICKETS    FACEBOOK EVENT

The New York Immigrant Freedom Fund is a program of the Brooklyn Community Bail Fund in partnership with an advisory board of community-based organizations fighting to dismantle our punitive immigration and detention systems. The advisory board consists of African Communities Together, Black Alliance for Just Immigration, Families for Freedom, Immigrant Defense Project, Make the Road New York, and the Surveillance Technology Oversight Project; other coalition partners include CAIR-NY.

With freedom as their guiding principle, NYIFF pays immigration bond for community members who are unable to afford it themselves, secures their release, and reunites them with their families and communities. Beyond paying individual bonds, NYIFF will harness our results to strategically and opportunistically influence the larger policy conversation on detention and deportation, in New York and nationally. NYIFF expects to pay bond for over 200 New Yorkers each year, at an average bond of $7,500.

OFFICIAL SELECTION – 1976 CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

Made by a young Parisian immigrant in his early 20s named Sidney Sokhona as he recoiled from a rash of exploitations and abuses in France’s African migrant community, NATIONALITÉ: IMMIGRÉ dramatizes the real-life rent strike undertaken by Sokhona and his neighbors in the Rue Riquet settlement housing, a “docu-fiction” of its own community in collaboration that’s unlike anything you’ve before seen in “world cinema”. One could hardly be blamed for interpreting the film as an endless litany of dehumanizing bureaucratic obstacle courses – as Serge Daney pointed out in his review “On Paper”, the film juts uncomfortably against the militant Left’s emphasis on using rupture theory to delegitimize the legal process, a high-minded option unavailable to immigrants like those depicted here. Sokhona took to filming after the Aubervilliers scandal of January 1970 – when five African migrants died in an overcrowded shelter on the periphery of Paris due to asphyxiation – prompting then-Prime Minister Jacques Chaban-Delmas to declare an end of these settlements, sometimes nicknamed bidonvilles or caves, by 1973. The filmmaker wasn’t so optimistic – but then, what NATIONALITÉ: IMMIGRÉ does offer is a rare glimpse at community organizing coming into praxis on both sides of the camera, with many of Sokhona’s neighbors playing themselves. (Sokhona financed the film in piecemeal fashion once scene at a time while working as a telephone operator.) While the thrust of NATIONALITÉ: IMMIGRÉ is unabashedly polemical, the loose narrative structure allows Sokhona to pursue fascinating side-stories and political tangents, at times dipping from what appears to be pure verite into a purely Brechtian exercise wherein immigrants are handed jobs in the form of huge placards, which they must carry around their necks, denoting their net worth to society in material terms.

In Cahiers du Cinema, Sokhona would elaborate to Daney and Jean-Pierre Oudart that “I was not sure that he who had loved NATIONALITÉ: IMMIGRÉ would like it – which does not mean that no one can love both. SAFRANA is, for me, the continuation of N:I. At the time it was done, compared to the reality of that time, there were a number of plans in the construction of the film itself on which we had to pass. For the first time, perhaps, people saw things they had never seen – so their membership was much simpler. I think people also ask: should a film about immigration be cinema? N.I. was in black and white, there was a certain desired poverty – it’s unthinkable to film an immigrant’s home in color…. People will go see a movie; of course they will see a subject, but it must be possible to express it in a very simple way. I think a political film – or engagé – can use other weapons, and touch a large number of people taking account of the movies.”

Assuming the position of both French and African filmmaker, Sokhona published a kind of manifesto in Cahiers du Cinema entitled “Notre Cinema” (Our Cinema), wherein he decried the cultural feedback loop enabled by state funding (especially in postcolonial cases), the incessant use of African landscapes as backdrops for tawdry Western melodramas, and the pigeonholing of black movies in festival programming – citing that the 1976 Cannes Film Festival included CAR WASH in its main slate, but consigned Ousmane Sembene’s CEDDO to competition in Directors’ Fortnight. If SAFRANA closes on an impossibly optimistic note for Sokhona (as the audience has, over the too-brief course of two movies, come to understand him), it reveals itself in hindsight as a byproduct of the French example, wherein the the organizing onscreen bears a utopian fruit that’s nevertheless untrustworthy. (Sokhona alleges that audiences were far more skeptical about the immigrants’ warm countryside reception in discussions following screenings in Paris.) What’s universalized in the humiliations of NATIONALITÉ: IMMIGRÉ remains – or as Sokhona put it to Cahiers, “Immigration has not only served to alienate us but also to teach us to be ashamed of what we were before. Any immigrant with a conscience realizes he has as much to claim on the workers’ side as the farmers’, today.”

~ screening with ~

LIBRE
dir. Anna Barsan, 2018
12 mins. United States.
 
For detained immigrants who can’t pay their bond, for-profit companies like Libre by Nexus offer a path to reunite with their families. But for many, the reality is much more complicated.
 
Introduction by Lee Wang, Director of the New York Immigrant Freedom Fund.

MATE-ME POR FAVOR (KILL ME PLEASE)

(KILL ME PLEASE) MATE-ME POR FAVOR
dir. Anita Roche de Silveira, 2015
Brazil/Argentina, 105 mins

FRIDAY, MAY 3 – 10 PM
MONDAY, MAY 20 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, MAY 29 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS    FACEBOOK EVENT

Anita Rocha de Silveira’s feature debut is a neon-hued, slow teen cinema nightmare set amongst the wasteland-like expanses between towering highrises in Barra da Tijuca. Left to their own devices, a group of listless high school students scheme, bleed, and desire — eventually developing a morbid obsession with the victims of spectral serial killer who is haunting the neighborhood.

A Cinema Slate Release.

BUTCHER, BAKER, NIGHTMARE MAKER


aka NIGHT WARNING
dir. William Asher, 1981
96 min.

THURSDAY, MAY 2 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, MAY 9 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, MAY 10 – MIDNIGHT
WEDNESDAY, MAY 15 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS    FACEBOOK EVENT

“A true gem of the decade – the 1980’s most twisted, bizarre cinematic vision of motherhood”John Kenneth Muir, Horror Movies of the 1980’s

In honor of Mother’s Day, Spectacle is happy to present the crazed aunt-mother slasher-spectacular BUTCHER, BAKER, NIGHTMARE MAKER aka NIGHT WARNING.

Susan Tyrrell (Fat City, Cry-Baby) delivers an off-the-charts lead performance as Cheryl, a woman raising her nephew Billy as her own son—who she happens to have a deeply repressed sexual attraction to—after the accidental death of his parents.

When Billy decides to leave for college, Cheryl murders a man in their home—claiming he was trying to assault her—in a desperate bid to get Billy to stay. Her plan backfires when the virulently homophobic police detective (Bo Svenson, having a little too much fun) becomes convinced that Billy, caught up in a gay love triangle, is the real murderer.

A gonzo slice of Grand Guignol exploitation filmmaking from veteran TV director William Asher, BBNM is a strange beast —not quite slasher-y enough for horror and a little too lurid for the thriller crowd (it made the ‘video nasty’ list despite the relatively tame body count, and one negative review referred to it as “Tennessee Williams’ version of Psycho”).

Despite the exploitative trappings, and without spoiling too much, the film’s views on sexuality turn out to be surprisingly modern—particularly by 1982 standards—making this slasher oddity well worth another look.

PERMANENT GREEN LIGHT

PERMANENT GREEN LIGHT
dir. Dennis Cooper and Zac Farley, 2018
France, 92m

THURSDAY MAY 2 – 7:30 PM
SATURDAY, MAY 4 – 10 PM
SUNDAY, MAY 5 – 5PM
FRIDAY MAY 10 – 10PM

ONLINE TICKETS     

With their follow-up to 2015’s LIKE CATTLE TOWARDS GLOW and sundry collaborative works, visual artist Zac Farley and acclaimed novelist plunge back into the troublingly opaque headspace of disaffected young men. Roman (Benjamin Sulpice) becomes increasingly driven to disappear — complete erase himself from existence — and decides that only a spectacularly impersonal death will accomplish this: blowing himself up in public.

Thanks to Altered Innocence.

NOISE

NOISE
(ノイズ)
dir. Yusako Matsumoto, 2017
115 mins. Japan.
In Japanese with English subtitles.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 – 10 PM
FRIDAY, MAY 3 – 7:30 PM
MONDAY, MAY 6 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, MAY 14 – 10 PM

ONLINE TICKETS    FACEBOOK EVENT

Yusako Matsumoto’s ensemble drama NOISE revisits the Akihabara massacre of 2008, in which a young schizophrenic named Tomohiro Katō drove a truck into the posh Tokyo shopping district, then took to attacking pedestrians with a knife – ultimately injuring 10 and killing 7. In the tradition of SHORT CUTS and TRAFFIC, Matsumoto uses disparate, seemingly unrelated plot threads to weave together a damning portrait of Japanese society. Real-life pop star Kokoro Shinozaki stars as Misa, an aspiring “idol” whose mother was killed in Akihabara; Ken (Kohsuke Suzuki) is a delivery boy nearing the end of his patience while his alcoholic mother squanders all his money, indebted to a loan shark at whose club Misa performs. Rie (Urara Anjo) is a wandering teenager whose dreams of wealth and fame eventually lead her to the same dark nexus as the other two characters. First-time filmmaker Matsuomo was a teenager at the time of Akihabara and also suffered the suicide of a close friend the same week as the massacre; he has described NOISE as his attempt to put the tragedies in relation to one another. The result is a hypnotic, paranoid puzzle of a film, a indictment of the curbed possibilities and existential dread lingering behind the ever-smoothening facade of life in the modern megalopolis.

Ellipsis: Refractions

SATURDAY, MAY 4 – 7:30 PM
(This event is $10)

ONLINE TICKETS    FACEBOOK EVENT

A moving image program taking place in different small cinemas and film houses around New York City, Ellipsis is a series that stages conversations between works that otherwise may not be. Bringing together different artists and filmmakers from a variety of contexts spanning from the museum to the gallery to a film festival or traditional cinema, Ellipsis looks beyond the Western canon for films and videos that speak to historicity, place and ruin, and image and the homage to find a connection between different modes of storytelling across both literal and aesthetic languages.

This program draws artists and filmmakers together from vastly different contexts working primarily in essay, experimental, and narrative filmmaking and/or video work. Focusing on the idea of “landscape,” each artist raises questions on the inevitability of ruins, identity, cartography, spirituality, infatuation and exploitation in their immediate and desired environment(s). This screening pushes viewers to consider the ways in which we translate our surroundings into a visual language, which translates again and again into a multitude of contexts.

Program:

EL LABERINTO
Laura Huertas Millán, 2018
Colombia, 21 minutes

DEEP SLEEP
Basma Alsharif, 2014
Kuwait/USA, 14 minutes

OJOS PARA MIS ENEMIGOS
Beatriz Santiago Muñoz, 2014
Puerto Rico, 14 minutes

BONESHAKER
Nuotama Frances Bodomo, 2013
Ghana, 13 minutes

NUKE YORK VOL. 1 – EAT THE RICH ON LSD

NUKE YORK VOL. 1: EAT THE RICH ON LSD
dir. Dracula O, 2019
NYC, 75 min.

FRIDAY, MAY 31 – 7:30 PM w/ filmmaker Q&A
FRIDAY, MAY 31 – 10 PM w/ filmmaker live commentary and Q&A
(These events are $5 with a canned food donation, $10 without.)

ONLINE TICKETS         FACEBOOK EVENT

Crawling through the sewers and out the shadows of subterranean New York City, this menacingly feral collage discloses the schismatic wildness of the city’s vital punk scene as it leads its vexed existence within a waking nightmare. The nightmare, of course, being a disgraceful police state among an ever-more sprawling cancerous gentrification. Against this bleak backdrop, NUKE YORK offers an inside look at a thriving renegade underbelly. Utilizing a raw assemblage of DV and found footage, we observe the essential punk dissatisfaction aligning its ideologies in solidarity with the distinctly marginalized. An ever-evolving subculture since its inception here four decades ago, the scene depicted demonstrates not only a pounding pulse of sonic survival, but its consistent claim to an eminent opposition to the foul and oppressive power structures which seek to subdue us.

New York ghost stories, grim on-the-street accounts from legit Brooklynites, yuppie harassment, and cameos by vintage horror fiends and legendary rock ’n’ rap artist abound, running a chaotic vaudeville interrupted only for a slew of inflamed performances by the cartel of Toxic State Records’ finest, including Warthog, Anasazi, L.O.T.I.O.N., Creeping Dose, Eyes Of Hate, Hank Wood & The Hammerheads, La Misma, Dawn Of Humans, Mommy, Sadist, Crazy Spirit, and other lewd acts. Encouraged by its makers to be bootlegged off the press, this film will serve as a incendiary time capsule documenting the NYC punk scene of yesterday, today, and forever for years to come.

[Canned food donations will be collected for Club A Kitchen, which distributes free community meals, warm clothes, sleeping gear, basic material necessities, and harm reduction supplies in Bushwick.]

SHIMMER – AND I REVEL

SHIMMER: AND I REVEL
dir. Ani Ivry-Block, 2019
40 min, USA

SUNDAY, MAY 5 – 7:30 PM

ONLINE TICKETS    FACEBOOK EVENT

Perhaps on the surface of something there is a shine and in that shine there is a glimmer. Perhaps that gleam lasts only a second and you are it’s sole observer.

Join Spectacle as we glide along the surface and shed dimensions in the featureless light . As vast as the night is long, revel in the instance and Enter Shimmer!

“And I Revel” is a visual album by Ani Ivry-Block, featuring the band SHIMMER (Ani, plus Paco Cathcart, Nina Ryser, and Simon Hanes) whose anticipated sophomore release “and I revel” hits the spin deck summer 2019.

SELEX

SELEX
dir. Various, 2019
40 min.

THURSDAY, MAY 9 – 7:30 PM
ONE NIGHT ONLY!

Grow a new tongue to lick the saltwater off the second Savory Selections. Only the greatest grassroots vid zine cavorting down the render halfpipe since the days of Tellus, Target, or Toy Machine; the Vid Art Lifeguard with a “Message of the Medium” tank top is running to give you mouth to mouth syllabus: but then whoa, shotgun weed instead- so Be Kind and puffpuffpass to a friend your copy of this Actual Physical Mixtape of Modern Marvels. Savory II parasails off the Zeit-crest Kahuna wave of post-Mind’s Eye pixelklutz neo-Jacolby landscape, thus transforming into a condor-faced Art Video humor jet shark firing turbo horror film signifiers but never abandoning Kucharian cardboard can-do. Assembled with unparalleled curatorial dexterity by samurai whizkid Mike Jensen, steeped in teas of both coastal undergrounds and with a dollop of cream for academic werewolves churning butter for undergrads, SELEX is an array of jewels to put bower birds to shame and cause temples of trustees to collapse heave a sigh of “I give up- you win”, sexy and smart as a dolphin talking a scientist into a handjob.

-Matt Thurber

FEATURING:
Theodore Sefcik
Erica Magrey
Ololade Adeniyi
Lilli Carré
Maya Ben David
LJ Frezza
Saige Rowe
Xela Flactem
Barry Doupé

[A limited run of VHS tapes will be available for purchase at the screening, and through RANDOM MAN EDITIONS.]