Author: lemkey

TOMBSTONE RASHOMON (NY Debut) & 2 MORE

Whether it’s the collision of punk rock and science-fiction in Repo Man, the war film with political agitprop in Walker or the Spaghetti Western with screwball comedy in Straight to Hell, Alex Cox has always been an inventive, engaging filmmaker about ten steps ahead of the mainstream. Since the relative commercial failure of Walker in the 80s (happy ending- it’s since been rediscovered for the masterpiece it is), Cox moved comfortably from Hollywood to making his films almost exclusively independently (and on occasion for the BBC), making projects as diverse as a sci-fi Borges adaptation, Revenger’s Tragedy, a documentary about Emmanuelle films, and a wacky, ultra-low-budget-and-proud-of-it spiritual sequel to Repo Man, called Repo Chick. His most recent, a return to his favorite genre, the western, is the crowdfunded Tombstone Rashomon, and Spectacle is proud to present it along with two of his other overlooked gems- The Searchers 2.0 and Three Businessmen. At Alex Cox’s request, 1/3 of the proceeds of all of these screenings will be donated to a homeless charity.




TOMBSTONE RASHOMON
Dir. Alex Cox, 2017
83 Minutes, USA, English

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 1 – 5 PM
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7 – 10 PM
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12 – 7:30 PM
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20 – 7:30 PM
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26 – 10 PM

NY Debut!
“Our subject is the Gunfight at the OK Corral, as it has come to be known (though it took place closer to Third and Frémont Streets, in Tombstone). This has been made into several films, including some great ones. Most tell the story from the perspective of Wyatt Earp, his brothers, and his friend the tubercular gambler/dentist, Doc Holliday. Usually Wyatt was depicted as the sheriff, or town marshal, defending Tombstone from a deadly outlaw ring. Occasionally films and written histories went the other way, depicting Wyatt as a ruthless, ambitious killer…

…The gunfight which concludes all these films was a significant event, depicted differently in every movie. Despite the myth of the face-to-face gunfight, most shootings out west were simple ambushes: the gunman hid out and bushwhacked his opponent. But on 26 October 1881, in Tombstone, eight men faced each other after several slights and face-offs; three of them died. Two long accounts of the gunfight appeared in the Tombstone papers the next day. It was reported in the San Francisco press, and treated in entirely partisan terms: Republican journals supported the Earps, Democrat papers supported the cowboy faction.

TOMBSTONE RASHOMON is a unique attempt to relate these events – and what led up to them – from the different perspectives of the individuals involved. Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan Earp each had his story, and Doc Holliday his; Sheriff Johnny Behan was present at the shootout, having tried to prevent it; Ike Clanton and Billy “the Kid” Claiborne survived the gun battle and told their tale; Billy Clanton and the McLaury brothers did not; Kate Fisher, Holliday’s partner, was lodging in the adjacent building and may have been a witness, also.

They are part of our cast of characters – the town of Tombstone is a character as well. Silver-mining towns enjoyed an average “boom” of three years, and Tombstone turned three in 1881. In the three years they lived there, the Earps saw a collection of tents and shacks grow into a mini-metropolis. Now the mines were beginning to flood, and by April it was intolerably hot and dusty. In June, a barrel of bad whiskey exploded, setting four city blocks ablaze. Then the rains came.

When the gunfight between gambler lawmen and cowboys erupted, there was snow on the ground…” -Alex Cox




THE SEARCHERS 2.0
Dir. Alex Cox, 2007
90 Minutes, USA, English

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3 – 7:30 PM
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18 – 7:30 PM
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24 – 7:30 PM

Cox returns to his favorite genre, the western, by way of the existential road picture, and reunites with longtime collaborators Sy Richardson (Repo Man, Straight to Hell, Sid & Nancy, Walker), Del Zamora (also Repo Man, Straight to Hell, Sid & Nancy, Walker) and Ed Pansullo (yup, Repo Man, Straight to Hell, Sid & Nancy, Walker) in an equally comedic and tragic story about two washed-up Western character actors, Fred and Mel, who seek revenge against a sadistic stuntman, Fritz Forbusher, who tormented them as children on the set of a film. Features cameos by Cox, Roger Corman and Leonard Maltin.

“Every screenplay I’ve written (how many is that? 40? 50?) has had the same initial response: ‘the characters are unsympathetic.’ Perhaps this is why so few of them were made. Financiers are simple, twisted souls who like a simple story with false breasts, perfect white teeth, and a muscular, anti-intellectual action hero. Fred lifts weights while watching TV but he is otherwise unheroic: bogarting the joints and the beer, telling ridiculous and untrue stories, bitching about Al Gore and Michael Moore. Mel is, if anything, worse: a penniless deadbeat dad who gets itinerant workers fired and lies to his daughter. And Fritz Frobisher, beater of little children, is the worst of all…

…the story was about actors, and the politics were in the sub-plot (we follow a trail of sad memorials to those killed in WWII, Afghanistan and Iraq)…

At one point in SEARCHERS 2.0, Mel and Fred are mistaken for homeless people by a Mexican guy who gives them a dollar. This follows the revelation that neither of them has health insurance. Not a big deal – 40% of the people living in the US [didn’t] have any [at the time the film was made], either. But imagine Bill Murray or Cheech Marin, or any other pair of upper-middle-class, Hollywood actors, trying to say those lines. It would be impossible. Worse, it would be despicable – like Jack Nicholson and Madonna playing homeless people, in a film for Universal.” -Alex Cox



THREE BUSINESSMEN
Dir. Alex Cox, 1998
80 minutes, UK, English

MONDAY, OCTOBER 2 – 10 PM
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7 – 5 PM
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11 – 10 PM
MONDAY, OCTOBER 23 – 7:30 PM

One of Alex Cox’s lesser seen films, and perhaps his funniest, in which he himself stars alongside frequent collaborator Miguel Sandoval (Repo Man, Straight to Hell) as two businessmen who cross five countries over the course of one while night looking for a good place to eat.

“It is always good to cast the director because you have to pay one salary less, one less airplane ticket, one less per diem. It’s even better if you can persuade them to edit the film as well, and to go and get coffee for the security guys.” -Tod Davies, producer

“It’s extremely exciting. Thrilling is not too strong a word. But it creeps up on you. It isn’t a rock’n’roll themed piece like REPO MAN…Yet it’s 100% subversive, and threatening to the MTV value system. It’s also very funny, but again, not like TV. And it all happens in the course of one night.” -Alex Cox

UBU FOREVER: Albie Thoms And The Australian Avant-Garde (Part One)

This fall, Spectacle is pleased to unveil a two-part series celebrating Australian auteur Albie Thoms and what would become the Australian New Wave – featuring three seminal features by Thoms practically never exhibited in North America, and a shorts program in November which will include experimental shorts by Thoms, Paul Winkler and Dirk de Bruyn, as well as rare video interviews conducted by ArtFilms’ Kriszta Doczy.

A multivalent filmmaker and theatre artist, Albie Thoms (1941-2012) was a hardcore avant-gardist, responsible for bringing the works of Arrabal to Australia and founding the Sydney Filmmakers Cooperative and the UBU collective, alongside Aggy Read, John Clark and David Perry. The restorations of his work made available by ArtFilms provide invaluable insight to a disjunction in Australian cinema that dominated the 1960s and 70s – between state-subsidized works (some of whose makers would indeed eventually migrate to Los Angeles) and a relentless, drugged-out underground community, which drew as much from Artaud and Beckett as it did from Thoms’ more lauded contemporaries in Europe and New York City. As ever, crossover between these spheres happened early and often; to cite just one example, Thoms codirected his short film …IT DROPPETH AS THE GENTLE RAIN with Bruce Beresford, who would go on to direct Hollywood productions like TENDER MERCIES and DOUBLE JEOPARDY.

This trio – each title made with grants on low budgets, heavily improvised and deeply influential within the Sydney experimental scene – are Thoms’ only three features. Each betrays his signature interest in using juxtaposition and particularly sound montage to push the narrative envelope, collapsing conventional narrative cinematic tropes into a new language that’s as trangressive now as it was in the 1970s.

Special thanks to Jesse Pires (International House Philadelphia), Kriszta Doczy (ArtFilms), soda_jerk and Sukhdev Sandhu (New York University Colloquium for Unpopular Culture).



MARINETTI
dir. Albie Thoms, 1969
85 mins. Australia.

“MARINETTI is not a Hollywood film of predigested responses. Unless an audience is prepared to give itself for the duration of the film, to accept the delirium, then communication is stifled… the audience at the film’s Sydney premiere were not willing to do this, and by their own hostiligy created an unpleasant experience. Images relayed at the rate of twenty four per second might be ‘murder on the eyes’ for some people, but for others they can create the ‘delirium that is communicative.’ Those that booed and walked out of MARINETTI might think of the opening of Jarry’s Ubu Roi in 1896, where a similar demonstration took place. Film enthusiasts might recall audiences who booed and hissed when the first screen closeup was used – that the audience, resentful that they couldn’t se the actors’ hands and feet, felt that something was being denied to them. MARINETTI is feature length because I hoped it would be an experience that would affect people’s lives…. Joan Kerr of Nation (Sydney) saw the theme of MARINETTI as ‘the inevitable myth of 20th century man as he progresses from an idyllyc view of life through personal madness to the final realization that the whole world is insane… and the only solution to it all is to endure it. But the final words of the film are not endure but enjoy… Audiences can avoid or endure it, or enjoy it. The responsibility is with them. My responsibility ended when I completed the film.” – Albie Thoms, Polemics For A New Cinema



SUNSHINE CITY
dir. Albie Thoms, 1973
118 minutes. Australia.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 2 – 7:30 PM
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8 – 5 PM
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11 – 7:30 PM
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25 – 10 PM

SUNSHINE CITY is Albie Thom’s sprawling, protoplasmic experimental portrait of his hometown of Sydney. The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia call it “a structured diary film which investigates the process of living in Sydney, which uses a repeating light modulation to intensify experiences of light, heat, colour”.

It also probes the city’s Yellow House art community and includes interviews with significant members thereof, including Mick Glasheen, Martin Sharp, Aggy Read, Brett Whiteley and Germaine Greer. Like the entirety of Thoms’ second film, the interviews are shot in an innovative and unconventional manner, shooting single continous takes and ending when the film in the camera runs out. With near-every other frame flash exposed, the film harkens to contemporaneous works by Jonas Mekas and Peter Kubelka

Before production began, Thoms wrote that “SUNSHINE CITY will be a record of my responses to the people and places of the city of Sydney. It will show the visual environment and synthesize the sound environment. It will allow the people to speak, and will try and relate their lives to the environment, to try and express the way the environment, the light, the sunshine, the visual stimulation, the cultural history of the city, conditions the lives of people and creates their character. It will be an analytic film, determining its own aesthetic, forcing attention to the filming process, to the materials of the film experience.”





PALM BEACH

dir. Albie Thoms, 1980
88 minutes. Australia.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4 – 7:30 PM
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12 – 10 PM
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 – 10 PM
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25 – 7:30 PM

“Paul was looking for work… Joe was looking for drugs… Leilani was looking for good times… Larry was looking for Leilani… They all ended up in…”

Four characters, all misfits of a sort, cross paths over one weekend on the northern beaches of Sydney. Leilani (Amanda Berry) is a runaway 16-year-old; Larry (John Flaus) is a private eye who’s looking for her; Joe (Ken Brown) needs to score some LSD to get him out of trouble. Paul (Bryan Brown) is unemployed and broke, until he steals a gun.

Described as “the ultimate surf movie”, PALM BEACH is an entirely different kind of magnum opus from MARINETTI: a restless multi-character drama (anticipating the “hyperlink cinema” of the 90s and 2000s) centered on these disparate plotlines, each shot in long tracking-shot takes. It is a peerless feat of improvisation drawn in just over a hundred shots; what really sticks is Thoms’ use of overlapping dialogue and diagetic audio to stitch scenes together, a daring juxtaposition that grates in the fleeting moment but creates an overwhelming depiction of society as blissed out as it is logjammed.

“PALM BEACH is a film of casual but cunning construction […] a terrible reminder that there are people of great ability who have never been able to pursue their craft in the Australian film industry, while dozens of mediocrities have had the chance to squander countless dollars and a multitude of opportunities.” – Geoff Gardiner, Australian Film 1978-1992

MATCH CUTS PRESENTS: AWAKE, A DREAM FROM STANDING ROCK

MONDAY, OCTOBER 9TH – 7:30 PM

ONE NIGHT ONLY !

MATCH CUTS PRESENTS commemorates its first full year in partnering with Spectacle Theater with a screening of AWAKE, A DREAM FROM STANDING ROCK on Monday, October 9th, aka “Columbus Day.” Proceeds and donations collected this evening will go towards the Water Protector Legal Collective.

AWAKE, A DREAM FROM STANDING ROCK
dir. Josh Fox, James Spione, and Myron Dewey, 2017.
USA, 89 min.

The Water Protectors at Standing Rock captured world attention through their peaceful resistance. While many may know the details, AWAKE, A Dream from Standing Rock captures the story of Native-led defiance that forever changed the fight for clean water, our environment and the future of our planet. The film is a collab­oration between Indigenous filmmakers, Director Myron Dewey, Executive Producer Doug Good Feather, and environmental Oscar-Nominated filmmakers Josh Fox and James Spione. It is a labor of love to support the peaceful movement of the water protectors.

MATCH CUTS is a weekly podcast centered on video, film and the moving image. Match Cuts Presents is dedicated to presenting de-colonialized cinema, LGBTQI films, Marxist diatribes, video art, dance films, sex films, and activist documentaries with a rotating cast of presenters from all spectrums of the performing and plastic arts and surrounding humanities. Match Cuts is hosted by Nick Faust and Kachine Moore.

SPECTOBER VII

“A bloody moon…A scream of fear…A night of Living Hell…”

In the heyday of Satanic Panic, director Jag Mundhra (OPEN HOUSE) found a way to blend elements of giallo, supernatural horror, and slashers to create a waking nightmare fueled by heavy metal, blood, and the dark lord himself.
As a young boy Tommy (all-star character actor Gregory Scott Cummings AKA: Mac’s dad in It’s Always Sunny…) bore witness to the brutal murder of his father on Halloween night by the hand of his cult-leader grandfather (Hy Pyke – who you can see nude in DOLEMITE if you want) and kept the secret for years.

Now 18 Tommy’s seemingly kindly, pumpkin delivering, Foghorn Leghorn sounding grandpa is ready to show him “the power of the blood” and bring him into the fold.

As Halloween draws ever closer people close to Tommy start getting bumped off by a killer in a demonic mask wearing the garb of grandpa’s cult. Who is this masked killer? Gramps? Tommy himself? …or could it be someone much, much worse.

Long available only on bootleg HACK-O-LANTERN has been lovingly restored from it’s original 35mm negative by our friends at Massacre Video and presented this Spectober as a sacrifice to our lord Satan.

 


THE SATANIC RITES OF DRACULA
Dir. Alan Gibson, 1973
UK, 87 min.
English

“Evil rules, you know. It really does.”

The last in Hammer’s run of Lee vs. Cushing Dracula films, the last Hammer film to use actual occultists as consultants, and a lurid stew of spy tropes, supernatural horror, black masses, THE SATANIC RITES OF DRACULA is considered a lesser Hammer by Anglophiles and dilettantes, but we know better, don’t we? Just consider one of the absolute best-ever monologues of cosmic dread and horror from Freddie Jones, playing Julian Keeley, a professor commanded to create a virulent variant on the black plague in order to serve the whims of The Dark Lord Lucifer! Sidestepping earlier period-piece Gothic trappings for a thoroughly contemporary London, it’s both sleek and pulpy, with as many gunfights, dirtbike chases, double crosses, regular crosses, basement nightgown covens of undead brides and occult goings-on as anyone could possibly want. A secret sect of British VIPs perform unholy rites of sacrifice in order to appease their abominable lord! It’s always fun to watch Lee and Cushing face off, the secret agent/cop drama aspect keeps everything at a brisk clip, and if that’s not enough to sell you it literally starts with a black mass in which a woman is sacrificed and returns from the dead!



YOUR VICE IS A LOCKED ROOM AND ONLY I HAVE THE KEY

Dir. Sergio Martino, 1972.
Italy. 97 min.
In English

“I don’t feel like being involved in one of your spectacles.”

Made between ALL THE COLORS OF THE DARK and TORSO, YOUR VICE IS A LOCKED ROOM AND ONLY I HAVE THE KEY is a misanthropic, brooding, manipulative and beautiful treatment of Edgar Allen Poe’s story “The Black Cat.” It also has a drunk author getting J&B shipped by the crate to his house, which might be the gialloest thing ever. Fans of Sergio Martino’s earlier film THE STRANGE VICE OF MRS. WARDH (from which this film gets it name) might be thrown a bit by the subdued, sullen quality, but it’s part of a greater plan, a plan that includes commune freak-outs, slaughtered mistresses, gratuitous POV (on line with Martino’s next film, TORSO) and perhaps greatest of all, Edwige Fenech, of whom we can say nothing without getting the vapors. With a storyline that’ll satisfy no-loose-ends mystery fans, enough jaw-dropping cinematography and costuming to please the art crowd, and Martino’s thoughtful and visceral style (there’s also a great Bruno Nicolai score to sweeten the pot), YOUR VICE…might be Martino’s finest.

“A film with that wears its dubious morality on its sleeve, “Your Vice Is a Locked Room and Only I Have the Key” is a tasty bit of giallo goodness. Kinky and cruel, it lives up to its purple prose title and will surely satisfy the appetites of Eurotrash fans.” –Tenebrous Kate, Love Train For The Tenebrous Empire

IMAGINE SCIENCE FILM FESTIVAL – FROZEN MAY AND MEMORY ERROR

Since 2008, the Imagine Science Film Festival has been plumbing the spaces between science and art for the most unique and inventive scientific fictions, surrealist documentaries, lab data aesthetics, and thought-provoking experimental film. For our tenth year, the theme of the festival is HYBRID, so we’re seeking those interstitial film forms more than ever. And we’ve saved some of the best for Spectacle.


MEMORY ERROR

various filmmakers, 2015 – 2017
77m.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 16 – 7:30 PM

Following last year’s Optic Nerves program, we return to Spectacle with another selection of the most thrillingly bizarre of the year’s scientific fictions and experiments. This year’s program focuses on copying glitches and mis-recollections: forgotten faces, genetic errors, holographic tourism, unstable computer graphics, and hazy VHS memories.


FROZEN MAY

aka FAGYOTT MÁJUS
dir. Péter Lichter, 2017
Hungary, 72m.

NORTH AMERICAN PREMIERE
MONDAY, OCTOBER 16 – 10 PM

1990, after the fall. Alone in the ambiguous tension and beauty of natural landscapes devoid of all but the remnants of civilization, a survivor seeks someone lost. This is genre as unsettled mood and creeping doubt, a horror script shot entirely in psychological landscape and desperate POV, perhaps a Carpenter script as reimagined by James Benning and Chantal Akerman. Whatever it is, Hunagarian experimental filmmaker Péter Lichter’s first feature exerts a strange power, drawing the viewer straight into its bleak but seductive forests of fog and shadow, seeking answers, with only a broken Commodore 64 as witness and narrator.

CINAP CINATAS II: WHERE EVIL SMELLS



CINAP CINATAS II: WHERE EVIL SMELLS

Various directors, compiled by Darren Bauler
United States Of American Death, 50 min.
Fuck Your Secular Laws

 

When the original CINAP CINATAS showed in 2015, a number of viewers considered it nostalgic, a look back at a simpler time when militant Christianity was ascendant and fearmongering politicians ruled the land, a time now made somewhat quaint by our evolution into contemporary rational neoliberal humanism.

As Bobby BeauSoleil would say, ain’t life peculiar.

We return to the maelstrom of thrash metal, gut-churning 80s video nasties, televangelistic rants and teenage nihilism with more clips from police training videos, VHS sermons, intercepted broadcasts and piss-yellow journalism, thrown together in a mishmash meant to recreate the mindscape of a kid weaned on 20 sided dice, Slayer bootlegs and unblocked satellite tv who took all of this as absolute fact. Intended not as a history lesson nor as a moral fable, we dismiss all attempts to contextualize this material as folly, content to mainline apocalyptic jouissance with no regard for mental health or reasonable discourse. No answers, no solutions, no thinkpieces, no escape. SMELL AWAITS.

AN EVENING WITH AKOSUA ADOMO OWUSU


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22 – 8:00 PM

For ONE NIGHT ONLY filmmaker Akosua Adomo Owusu will join us at Spectacle for a presentation of short-form works culminating in the New York premiere screening of her new short ON MONDAY OF NEXT WEEK, based on the short story of same name by Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Owusu will be joined by cast and crew for a Q&A following the short.

Akosua Adoma Owusu is a Ghanaian-American filmmaker and producer whose films have screened worldwide in prestigious film festivals, museums, galleries, universities and microcinemas since 2005. Her work addresses the collision of identities, where the African immigrant located in the United States has a “triple consciousness.” Owusu interprets Du Bois’ notion of double consciousness and creates a third identity or consciousness, representing the diverse consciousness of women and African immigrants interacting in African, white American, and black American culture.

ON MONDAY OF NEXT WEEK secured a nomination at the 2017 African Movie Academy Awards and was supported in part by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and the Creative Capital Foundation. Owusu’s film work has received support from Tribeca All Access, IFP, Focus Features Africa First, the Art Matters Foundation, the Camargo Foundation and the Berlinale World Cinema Fund. Recent projects include reviving Ghana’s historic Rex Cinema as a creative space for art, music, and film.

Owusu’s work is included in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Centre Pompidou, the Fowler Museum, Yale University Film Study Center, and Indiana University Bloomington, home of the Black Film Center/Archive. Owusu holds MFA degrees in Film & Video and Fine Art from California Institute of the Arts and received her BA in Media Studies and Studio Art with distinction from the University of Virginia. She divides her time between Ghana and New York, where she works as a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.

THE 7TH ANNUAL SHREK SHOW

Buckle up, assholes! It;s time once again for the Spectacle Shrek Show!!!!!!!!111!!!!!!!111!!!!!! Eevry shrek movie back to back and then backwards while we dose you with a ton of brown acid. As usual all the money goes right in to our pockets and we scream at you and change the temperature a bunch. Forced donkey meat eating contest to follow! FUCK OFF.

Noon: Shrek
2pm: Shrek 2
4pm: Shrek the 3rd
6pm: Shrek Forever After
8pm: Shrek in the Swamp Karaoke Dance Party
10pm: Shrek 4-D
Midnight: Far Far Away Idol
2am: Donkey’s Caroling Christmas-tacular
4am: Shrek the Halls

THE 7TH ANNUAL SHRIEK SHOW

The world is horrible, that’s for sure but at least we all have Halloween. This year for the 7th Annual Spectacle Shriek Show we hope to – however briefly – help to take your mind off the impending nuclear strikes, natural disasters, sundowning “president,” bed bugs, the gathering darkness, and general malaise with a cavalcade of lady death rockers, turn of the century werewolves, cave monsters, carnivorous carnies, and globetrotting vampires. All this plus featured short films, regional news stories, cartoons, music videos, and more.

It’s time once more to turn off your brain, leave expectations at the door or at a nearby bodega, and settle in for roughly 12 to 14 hours of celebration.

We’re all in this together so make sure you bring enough candy corn to share.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21st – NOON-MIDNIGHT  (ONE DAY ONLY!) 

Full Schedule:
Noon: WOLF BLOOD
1:30pm: DIMENSION OF BLOOD / MONSTER IN THE GARAGE
3:00pm: DEAD GIRLS
4:30pm: VIDEO VIOLENCE (presented by Lunchmeat)
6:00pm: THE STRANGENESS
8:00pm: JUGULAR WINE: A VAMPIRE ODYSSEY (16mm)
10:30pm: MALATESTA’S CARNIVAL OF BLOOD (presented by AGFA)
Midnight: FATAL EXPOSURE



WOLF BLOOD: A TALE OF THE FOREST

dir. George Chesebro, 1925
68 min, USA
Silent

The earliest surviving werewolf film kicks off our seventh year. An important distinction to make since 1913’s THE WEREWOLF beat it out by 12 years but has sadly been lost to the ravages of time. Though this is Chesebor’s only directing credit, he would act in over 400 movies in his career.

Dick Bannister (director Chesebro pulling double duty) heads up a logging company in Canada is involved in a bloody dispute with rivals lead by Jules Deveroux (Roy Watson). While being visited by his boss and her pal the doctor – Dick is viciously attacked and left for dead. Dick is badly in need of a blood transfusion – with time running out and no human blood at the ready the doctor uses the next best thing – wolf blood.

While on the mend Dick has a series of nightmares about running with a pack of wolves. When the men in the rival camp wind up slaughtered, apparently by a wolf – Dick’s greatest fears seem to be realized. The rumor mills begin churning with word getting out that Dick is a horrid lycanthrope. Dick is faced with a harrowing choice: live on as a bloodthirsty beast or take his own life?


DIMENSION OF BLOOD / MONSTER IN THE GARAGE
dir. Joe Sherlock, 1996/1997
68 min, USA

The first two films by cult filmmaker and illustrator Joe Sherlock are a welcome addition to the Shriek Show canon. With 30 years of filmmaking under his belt, Joe has a deep love for all things horror, a penchant for practical effects, and a tongue planted firmly in his cheek. What would our marathon be without some rubber masks, homemade slime, or butchery on a budget? Nothing.

Direct from the back of the VHS:

Dr. Thomas Mobius is investigating the origins of strange lifeforms found in South America. Suddenly his world is turned upside down when he and lab assistant Rachel Roundtree meet up with government agents, genetic mutations, and the mysterious Man In Black. As gruesome murders surround them can the pair find out what the conspiracy is all about before it’s too late? Find out when you enter the DIMENSION OF BLOOD!

Poor Steve. He’s a slob and everyone gives him a hard time about it, including his lovely wife Edie. As they prepare for a big party, little do they know that a hungry alien creature has escaped from a crashed flying saucer and is hiding out in their garage. As the party gets underway various guests start disappearing. Will the rest survive when they meet face-to-face with the MONSTER IN THE GARAGE?!?


DEAD GIRLS
dir. Dennis Devine, 1990
105 min, USA

Lucy Lethal, Cynthia Slayed, Nancy Napalm, Randy Rot and Bertha Beirut are all members of the metal band Dead Girls. These girls are not fucking around either. All their songs are about murder, suicide, death, and carnage. This whole schtick comes back to bite them in their collective ass when a fan tries to commit suicide while listening to their latest single aptly titled YOU’VE GOT TO KILL YOURSELF on repeat. No ones ass is more bitten however than lead singer Bertha when she discovers this fan is none other than her younger sister.

After repeated attempts at getting the girls to switch it up and go in a direction that’s less gore and more Leslie Gore, Bertha decides the Dead Girls are in need of a vacation. So to hit the reset button the band high-tails it out of town to a cabin in the woods for some sun and fun.

Little do they know that lurking in the shadows is every woman’s nightmare – a man in a fedora. He also has a skull mask but still. The band members are picked off one by one in manners related to some of their more ghastly tunes. Who is this masked killer?


LUNCHMEAT PRESENTS: VIDEO VIOLENCE
dir. Gary Cohen, 1987
98 min, USA

Despite of a longtime working relationship with both Camp Motion Pictures and Lunchmeat, we’ve never shown a crown jewel in their catalog Gary Cohen’s New Jersey SOV slasherterpiece – VIDEO VIOLENCE. This year we’ve finally decided to remedy that.

Steve and his wife, fresh from NYC, have just opened a new video store in town full of horror buffs. When an unlabeled tape shows up in the return bin, the staff can’t contain their curiosity and when the spools begin to turn they find themselves witnessing a grisly murder! A gen-u-ine snuff film! Steve runs to the cops and upon returning finds the tape swapped and his clerk missing. Local weird-beards Howard and Eli have settled into a nice habit of killing travelers and derelicts who wander into their sleepy little backwater burg but will their taped escapades lead to their demise? How far can too far go? Find out what happens when renting is not enough!

Special thanks to Gary Cohen, Josh Schafer, and Paige Davis for their unending support and generosity.


THE STRANGENESS
dir. Melanie Anne Phillips, 1985
90 min, USA

An unsung behemoth of American horror, THE STRANGENESS encompasses many if not all the elements that make up what a true “Spectacle” movie is. Filmmaker Melanie Anne Phillips (who worked under the pseudonym David Michael Hillman) blends a stop motion, claustrophobia, homemade sets, and great characters into an impressive DIY terror slurry.

A group of friends explore an abandoned underground mine only to find themselves sharing it with a slimy, tentacled monster. They are slaughtered. Years later THE DESCENT would make audiences squirm with a glossy version of this Lovecraftian nightmare. Characters are swallowed by the dark, with one standout scene lit only by a series of camera flashes. While much of the film was shot on location, some was actually recreated in the directors grandparents garage.

But don’t just take it from us…

“The monster is creepy looking, even if you’re not afraid of vaginas and part of it certainly does look like one.” – IMDb user HEFILM, 2006


JUGULAR WINE: A VAMPIRE ODYSSEY
dir. Blair Murphy, 1994
90 min, USA
special 16mm presentation

It’s 1994.

The dulcet tone’s of Slick Willy’s sax drift through the air, the World Wide Web was shaping up to be the cesspool we now know as the internet, and Beanie Babies had just gone into production.

Also, INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE came out. A globetrotting, moody, celebrity-stuffed tale of the torments of the eternal.

It’s 1994.

Filmmaker Blair Murphy has just released JUGULAR WINE. A sprawling, atmospheric, cameo laden tale of the torments of the eternal.

While JUGULAR WINE may not have the scope of INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE it certainly has more than it’s share of heart. Murphy (who grew up in a funeral home and currently lives in a giant haunted hotel in PA) shot on location in Philly, Alaska, New Orleans, LA, and Utah to tell the tale of an anthropologist on the trail of a cult of vampires. Along the way he runs into the likes of Stan Lee, Henry Rollins, and more. Undoubtedly a most ambitious undertaking. Murphy cut his teeth as a cameraman for the late Prince.

We’re proudly presenting the directors personal 16mm print at the center of this years marathon!


AGFA presents: MALATESTA’S CARNIVAL OF BLOOD
dir. Alfredo Zacarlas, 1980
92 min, Mexico

We are thrilled to have recently partnered with AGFA for screenings and have been chomping at the bit to show this slab of total insanity. It’s with great pleasure that we introduce our Shriek Show audience to the once-thought-lost-totally-bonkers MALATESTA’S CARNIVAL OF BLOOD!

From the AGFA website:

“Historically speaking, the carnival is where exploitation cinema learned most of its tricks.” — Stephen Thrower, author of Nightmare USA

On the surface, MALATESTA’S CARNIVAL OF BLOOD gives off the appearance of a throwaway bargain-bin curio — but once you dig even an inch below the surface, an entire ecosystem of crazy influences, found-garbage props in the style of “Pee-Wee’s Playhouse” and avant-garde techniques come into view. Plus, it’s entirely set in a rotting wooden 19th-century amusement park (which was bulldozed not long after the film was completed.)

Oh, and did we mention it co-stars “Fantasy Island” little person Herve Villechaize?

It’s tough to synopsize in one sentence, but here goes: an evil carnival impresario lures young people to work at his fun fair, so that he can feed them to the ravenous cannibals who live in a cave beneath the carnival and who watch arty silent horror film classics projected on the wall while they feast . . . ?

Why was this film made? Who cares?!

When a film’s end credits list a sound designer as providing “psychoacoustics,” you know it’s going to be a good time for cratediggers and other fans of the weird and rare.



FATAL EXPOSURE

(aka: MANGLED ALIVE)
dir. Peter B. Good, 1989
83 min, USA

As your brain slowly oozes out of your ears with only one film left to go you wonder “Surely there can’t be anything as nuts as that last movie. I love it here. I love Spectacle.”

Well, you’re mostly right.

The great-(great?)-grandson of Jack the Ripper -also named Jack – is a photographer. He drinks blood, photographs women in lingerie and kills them in weird ways like injecting them with acid. He also breaks the fourth wall a number of times.

Praised by Michael J. Weldon in the Psychotronic Film Guide for it’s “very good” cinematography and “very real” accents, Peter B. Good’s FATAL EXPOSURE brings another years marathon to a close. Worth noting that Good worked on Disney’s Wonderful World of Color which at one point also employed another Spectacle favorite – The Wizard of Speed and Time himself – Mike Jittlov. Oh and right after that he was director of photography on FACES OF DEATH III.

STOOP SALE 2017

STOOP SALE
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 – 11AM TO 7 PM

Hey! We’re selling stuff! Just like last year, only more! And as always, we have mint copies of posters from screenings gone by, a certain amount of recorded media, and various microcinematic ephemera.

In addition, we are offering a MIX TAPE (CD edition), made up of our in-house favorites to play before and after the movies. These are gonna be made to order, so be sure to loudly announce that you want one when you walk in. Not sure how much they will cost yet, but keep in mind that all moneys are going to your dearest high-rent microcinema that charges you only $5 to see countless films curated with great care.